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table/row/cell widths - who wins? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all;

    We have seen Word create documents where the table will have something like the table is set to auto width, the rows are set to a specific (dxa) width, and the columns are set to a % width. So my question is, who wins?

    1. If the cells win, then all cells set to a dxa width means ignore settings for table & row.
    2. If the table wins, then a table set to auto means ignore all settings for the rows & cells.
    3. Or...

    Based on our experiments I have a bad feeling it's some very convoluted logic that decides what part of each setting is used in conflicts. 17.18.87 makes it sound like the table setting decides (option 2 above).

    ??? - thanks - dave


    Who will win The Windward International Collegiate Programming Championships?

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013 9:20 PM

Answers

  • Hi David,

    In general if a property of a cell, in our case the width, is under different settings, the more specific “wins”. The table in your sample documentation isn’t good to demonstrate the different width setting for the same cell. The table has two rows and four columns, the grid setting is
          <w:tblGrid>
            <w:gridCol w:w="1870"/>
            <w:gridCol w:w="1870"/>
            <w:gridCol w:w="1870"/>
            <w:gridCol w:w="3740"/>
          </w:tblGrid>
    and eight cell settings, similar to this, for the fourth cells w=”2000”:
              <w:tcPr>
                <w:tcW w:w="1000" w:type="pct"/>
              </w:tcPr>
    The cell settings correspond to the grid setting. Because the cell contents can be fit with the preferred setting, Word displays the table with 1:1:1:2 width ratio.

    If the grid setting is modified, it has no effect, the table is displayed according to the cell settings. On the other hand, if the cell settings are modified, then Word displays the table according to the new settings.

    Thanks, Vilmos

    • Marked as answer by DavidThi808 Monday, December 30, 2013 10:00 PM
    Saturday, December 28, 2013 10:20 AM

All replies

  • Hi David,
    Thank you for this inquiry. One of our team members will look into this and follow-up soon.

    Regards,
    Edgar

    Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:03 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi David,

    I am the engineer who will be working with you on this issue. In order to better understand your question, please send the Word document file, you experimented with, as attachment to ‘dochelp (at) microsoft (dot) com’ and in the e-mail indicate that it is for me. Be sure that the file does not contain any confidential information. In addition, please tell, which elements and attributes I should investigate.

    Regards,
    Vilmos Foltenyi - MSFT

    Wednesday, December 11, 2013 7:53 AM
  • Hi David,

    In general if a property of a cell, in our case the width, is under different settings, the more specific “wins”. The table in your sample documentation isn’t good to demonstrate the different width setting for the same cell. The table has two rows and four columns, the grid setting is
          <w:tblGrid>
            <w:gridCol w:w="1870"/>
            <w:gridCol w:w="1870"/>
            <w:gridCol w:w="1870"/>
            <w:gridCol w:w="3740"/>
          </w:tblGrid>
    and eight cell settings, similar to this, for the fourth cells w=”2000”:
              <w:tcPr>
                <w:tcW w:w="1000" w:type="pct"/>
              </w:tcPr>
    The cell settings correspond to the grid setting. Because the cell contents can be fit with the preferred setting, Word displays the table with 1:1:1:2 width ratio.

    If the grid setting is modified, it has no effect, the table is displayed according to the cell settings. On the other hand, if the cell settings are modified, then Word displays the table according to the new settings.

    Thanks, Vilmos

    • Marked as answer by DavidThi808 Monday, December 30, 2013 10:00 PM
    Saturday, December 28, 2013 10:20 AM
  • When you said "the more specific “wins”", it all made sense. Because that's how styles, etc. all work.

    thanks - dave


    Who will win The Windward International Collegiate Programming Championships?

    Monday, December 30, 2013 10:00 PM