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Windows 8 killed my Windows 7 installation?

    Question

  • (There's a long read ahead...)

    Hello all,

    So, I just installed Windows 8 on my machine, and it basically destroyed my Windows 7 installation. Here's a quick idea of how my machines disks are set up:

    Disk 1: System Reserved, Windows 7, Kubuntu

    Disk 2: Storage (Program Files for Win7. Games)

    Disk 3: FAT32 storage, EXTENDED[Gentoo, Ubuntu, Windows 8, Linux Swap]

    Windows Bootmgr is set up with 2 entries: Windows 7 and Linux, a Grub2 chainloader entry that I added using EasyBCD.

     

    I mistakenly left my other disks in when I installed Windows 8, which I should have learned by now to not do. 

    When I booted up my machine after installing Windows 8, I was presented with a boot menu, asking if I wanted to use Windows 7 or 8. The first issue is that the Linux entry was not present. That's not a huge deal, though.

    When I selected Windows 7, the machine rebooted, and then attempted to load Windows 7. Instead, it jumped right into Windows 7 startup repair. I managed to fix that by running some commands from that startup repair.

    Upon booting Windows 7 again, I was told that winload.exe did not have the proper signature. I performed a system restore, which fixed that problem.

    Next, when I booted it again, it blue screened, saying something about needing to uninstall anti-virus, run chkdsk, etc. etc. I took a look at the Windows 7 partition, and the file system was reported as RAW instead of NTFS. I ran chkdsk, and about an hour later, that was fixed.

    Now, when I boot to Windows 7, I get past the boot screen, and then I'm presented a black screen with a cursor on it. Running it in Safe Mode yields the same result. CTRL+ALT+DEL, CTRL+SHIFT+ESC, etc. do nothing. I cannot get past that.

    Now, when I attempt to do a system restore, I am informed that there are no restore points to use, even though there were at least 7 earlier.

     

    After looking through many other forum threads, I'm pretty sure I'll need to reinstall Windows 7, but I just wanted to check here before I did so. If anyone has any ideas, let me know! (I won't be able to do anything with the machine until tomorrow, but I will try to answer any questions anyone has.)

     

    Thanks in advance!

     

     

    Thursday, November 10, 2011 10:28 PM

Answers

  • Thanks for the response.

    No dice, though. When I boot from the CD and select Upgrade, it tells me to do it from inside Windows, rather than booting the CD.

     

    I think I'll just reinstall, since I have some time with the long weekend. Thanks anyway, though!

    Friday, November 11, 2011 1:59 PM
  • Yeah, I always thought it was stupid, but it seems if setup detects a version of Windows eligible to upgrade, it forces you to run the upgrade from within Windows. (The repair guide at http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/3413-repair-install.html mentions that caveat.)
    I suppose it would have been possible to install over it and get a Windows.old folder, but it has to operate in a fairly limited space, since it's on an SSD.

    I went ahead and formatted and reinstalled, removed all the drives and then installed Windows 8 again, too. I then used NeoGrub in EasyBCD to add an entry to the Windows 7 bootloader that chainloads the Windows 8 bootloader. Really, this is how Windows should automatically set it up, IMHO. There's less to go wrong, since 2 operating systems don't "share" one bootloader.

    As it stands, it seems that Windows 8 is less dual-boot friendly than previous versions of Windows, which is saying something!

    Saturday, November 12, 2011 5:07 AM

All replies

  • First, you may want to uninstall the Windows Developer Preview from your PC. It might cause problems if you try to repair your computer with the method that I describe below.

    To repair your computer, I recommend that you do an in-place upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 7, if you have your CD. For the most part, this will repair your computer's operating system while keeping your existing programs, files and settings. Below, I descirbe the potential difficulties in more detail. Note that this is a repair installation, not a true upgrade. Insert the CD in the drive, select the Windows 7 partition as the drive you want to install Windows on, and select the “Upgrade” option. This will cause the installer to perform the upgrade install, which will should restore your PC to full functionality without erasing your files or removing all of your existing settings.There are some issues that you should be aware of:

    1. This may affect some of the settings in the programs installed on your computer. When you try to use various programs on your computer, you may find that they have to be reconfigured or adjusted. Be aware that you may end up needing to reauthorize iTunes if you have it installed, and it looks like you have no way to deauthorize it right now.

    2. Some operating system settings will be restored to their defaults. For example, the Most Frequently Used list in the Start Menu will display the default programs and the desktop background will be changed to the default “Harmony” image. Depending on how you have customized your PC, some of these settings may be restored to their defaults as well.

    3. If you have installed any updates on your PC, including Service Pack 1 or Internet Explorer 9, these will probably be removed by the upgrade. Other programs should remain intact.

    4. I have no idea how this will affect the other operating systems on your computer. As you stated in the post above, you should probably remove your other hard drives before attempting the install.

    Hope this works!

    -WindowsVista567


    Friday, November 11, 2011 3:01 AM
  • Thanks for the response.

    No dice, though. When I boot from the CD and select Upgrade, it tells me to do it from inside Windows, rather than booting the CD.

     

    I think I'll just reinstall, since I have some time with the long weekend. Thanks anyway, though!

    Friday, November 11, 2011 1:59 PM
  • It does? Are you sure that you can't continue past that point? It worked for me once. I don't see why it won't work for you. Maybe you should check online to see if you can do a repair install without selecting the "upgrade" option specifically.

    There is almost certianly a way to do this without deleting everything on the Windows 7 partition or using the "Windows.old" option.


    Update: Sorry, it does look like you will have to reinstall Windows 7. The repair installation only works if you initiate it from within Windows 7.
    Friday, November 11, 2011 9:13 PM
  • Yeah, I always thought it was stupid, but it seems if setup detects a version of Windows eligible to upgrade, it forces you to run the upgrade from within Windows. (The repair guide at http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/3413-repair-install.html mentions that caveat.)
    I suppose it would have been possible to install over it and get a Windows.old folder, but it has to operate in a fairly limited space, since it's on an SSD.

    I went ahead and formatted and reinstalled, removed all the drives and then installed Windows 8 again, too. I then used NeoGrub in EasyBCD to add an entry to the Windows 7 bootloader that chainloads the Windows 8 bootloader. Really, this is how Windows should automatically set it up, IMHO. There's less to go wrong, since 2 operating systems don't "share" one bootloader.

    As it stands, it seems that Windows 8 is less dual-boot friendly than previous versions of Windows, which is saying something!

    Saturday, November 12, 2011 5:07 AM
  • I went ahead and formatted and reinstalled, removed all the drives and then installed Windows 8 again, too. I then used NeoGrub in EasyBCD to add an entry to the Windows 7 bootloader that chainloads the Windows 8 bootloader. Really, this is how Windows should automatically set it up, IMHO. There's less to go wrong, since 2 operating systems don't "share" one bootloader.
     
    As it stands, it seems that Windows 8 is less dual-boot friendly than previous versions of Windows, which is saying something!
    So much easier to use a third-party boot manager such as BootIt from terabyteunlimited.com. In that case Windows 8 behaves exactly the same as any other Windows OS.
     

    David Wilkinson | Visual C++ MVP
    Saturday, November 12, 2011 10:22 AM