none
Decommisioning a .Net application RRS feed

  • Question

  • Has anyone decommisioned a .Net application? What else do I need to look for in the app other than any external interfaces, dependencies, shared libraries etc while I'm decommisioning a .Net application? Are there any tools available to do such analysis?
    Tuesday, November 19, 2013 9:54 AM

Answers

  • Again, you haven't clarified what you are trying to do.  There are tools to analyze code for various things (bugs, semantic issues, styling, etc) but there aren't any tools for identifying dependencies.  Dependencies can appear in many different ways (config entries, references, etc) so you would need to look at all of them.  This can be complicated by indirect dependencies (such as database connections in code outside the project, web service calls done using WebRequest instead of a standard client proxy, etc.

    Michael Taylor
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/p3net

    Thursday, November 21, 2013 2:54 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • What do you mean by decommission? If you're getting rid of an app then you just need to stop using it.  If you want to get rid of the dependencies as well then most of them are going to be in the same directory.  You can scan the config file to see what services and databases (if any) the app is using.  However these are generally not going to be removed at the same time as they are likely being used elsewhere.

    Michael Taylor
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/p3net

    Tuesday, November 19, 2013 6:52 PM
    Moderator
  • Are there any discovery tools which can be used for analyzing the code? I know if Understand which is helpful for C#. Are there any other tools which can be used for both C# and VB code ...or only VB code even?

    Thursday, November 21, 2013 8:22 AM
  • Again, you haven't clarified what you are trying to do.  There are tools to analyze code for various things (bugs, semantic issues, styling, etc) but there aren't any tools for identifying dependencies.  Dependencies can appear in many different ways (config entries, references, etc) so you would need to look at all of them.  This can be complicated by indirect dependencies (such as database connections in code outside the project, web service calls done using WebRequest instead of a standard client proxy, etc.

    Michael Taylor
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/p3net

    Thursday, November 21, 2013 2:54 PM
    Moderator