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Is Azure appropriate only to use for secondary backup RRS feed

  • Question

  • That's my question. We are looking for an alternative to store our secondary backup in the cloud instead of using tapes. Is Azure a good alternative for this or is it very (too) expensive. 

    Is someone here who used Azure only for this function? Or can someone please help me with this question?

    Thanks in advance!

    Thursday, September 20, 2012 8:40 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    I would think it would make for a very cost-effective solution. If you backed up files to Blob storage for example, the storage costs for data are very competative. Also, as you are not currently billed for data ingress (sending data to Azure), sending a lot of data on a regular basis will not cost much (you will still be billed for storage transactions). It should be fairly easy to calculate the monthly cost based on the data stored, you woud have to run a test to see how many transactions you are using.

    You will have to be aware of any legal restrictions of storing data in the cloud.

    I'm sure other people have looked at this. There may well be some blogs, sample code, or commercial applications that can be used to manage the backup process.

    Regards,

    Alan


    Free EBook: "Windows Azure Service Bus Developer Guide" http://www.cloudcasts.net/devguide/

    • Proposed as answer by Veerendra Kumar Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:33 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jiang Yun Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:21 PM
    Thursday, September 20, 2012 8:52 AM
  • I think Windows Azure is an excellent platform for backing up data, primary as well as secondary.

    These are some of the reasons why I think so:

    Price: At around 120,- per TB you have very competitive pricing for storage.

    Redundancy: all your data is copied twice in the datacenter you select.

    Geo-redundancy: At that price I mentioned all you data is also replicated to a second datacenter (500+ miles apart) with 3 copies, effectively leaving you with 6 backups of all your bits. Disabling this feature reduces the price by 23-34% (check the pricing site for updates on this).

    There are some tools available on codeplex like AzureBackup to setup a backup process yourself from on-prem to the cloud and vice versa. Microsoft is also previewing an online backup service called Windows Azure Online Backup delivered as a SaaS solution. A couple of commercial software companies (like Cloudberry) also support Azure Storage in their solutions.

    This might go without saying but one thing to note is that the feasibility of your cloud backup solution will depend on the kind of data you wish to backup and the legislation that is concerned with that data. Here's where many scenario's break, for good and bad reasons (like a lack of understanding the law & the security technology available).

    Hope this is usefull.


    Never miss the latest Windows Azure news on http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/


    • Edited by Valery Jacobs Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:10 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Veerendra Kumar Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:33 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jiang Yun Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:21 PM
    Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:07 AM
  • Yes,

    You can safely choose windowss azure as an alternative for this. Due its Geo redunancy and replication capabilities you will get failover and recovery mechanisms out of box with very low cost.

    Opting for Geo redunacy will cost you, but still is not so costly.

    Blob storage will give you lot of space to back up your data. If you want persistent storage, with more control like you do onpremise you can think of persistent VMs also on azure. But blob storage with PaaS capabilities is more effecient.

    @Vallery Jacobs provided very good alternates. You can try any of them. Please let us know for any spcific details you may want on any of the azure capabilities or features.



    Please mark the replies as Answered if they help and Vote if you found them helpful.

    • Proposed as answer by Veerendra Kumar Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:38 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jiang Yun Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:20 PM
    Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:38 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    I would think it would make for a very cost-effective solution. If you backed up files to Blob storage for example, the storage costs for data are very competative. Also, as you are not currently billed for data ingress (sending data to Azure), sending a lot of data on a regular basis will not cost much (you will still be billed for storage transactions). It should be fairly easy to calculate the monthly cost based on the data stored, you woud have to run a test to see how many transactions you are using.

    You will have to be aware of any legal restrictions of storing data in the cloud.

    I'm sure other people have looked at this. There may well be some blogs, sample code, or commercial applications that can be used to manage the backup process.

    Regards,

    Alan


    Free EBook: "Windows Azure Service Bus Developer Guide" http://www.cloudcasts.net/devguide/

    • Proposed as answer by Veerendra Kumar Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:33 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jiang Yun Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:21 PM
    Thursday, September 20, 2012 8:52 AM
  • I think Windows Azure is an excellent platform for backing up data, primary as well as secondary.

    These are some of the reasons why I think so:

    Price: At around 120,- per TB you have very competitive pricing for storage.

    Redundancy: all your data is copied twice in the datacenter you select.

    Geo-redundancy: At that price I mentioned all you data is also replicated to a second datacenter (500+ miles apart) with 3 copies, effectively leaving you with 6 backups of all your bits. Disabling this feature reduces the price by 23-34% (check the pricing site for updates on this).

    There are some tools available on codeplex like AzureBackup to setup a backup process yourself from on-prem to the cloud and vice versa. Microsoft is also previewing an online backup service called Windows Azure Online Backup delivered as a SaaS solution. A couple of commercial software companies (like Cloudberry) also support Azure Storage in their solutions.

    This might go without saying but one thing to note is that the feasibility of your cloud backup solution will depend on the kind of data you wish to backup and the legislation that is concerned with that data. Here's where many scenario's break, for good and bad reasons (like a lack of understanding the law & the security technology available).

    Hope this is usefull.


    Never miss the latest Windows Azure news on http://blogs.msdn.com/b/windowsazure/


    • Edited by Valery Jacobs Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:10 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Veerendra Kumar Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:33 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jiang Yun Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:21 PM
    Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:07 AM
  • Yes,

    You can safely choose windowss azure as an alternative for this. Due its Geo redunancy and replication capabilities you will get failover and recovery mechanisms out of box with very low cost.

    Opting for Geo redunacy will cost you, but still is not so costly.

    Blob storage will give you lot of space to back up your data. If you want persistent storage, with more control like you do onpremise you can think of persistent VMs also on azure. But blob storage with PaaS capabilities is more effecient.

    @Vallery Jacobs provided very good alternates. You can try any of them. Please let us know for any spcific details you may want on any of the azure capabilities or features.



    Please mark the replies as Answered if they help and Vote if you found them helpful.

    • Proposed as answer by Veerendra Kumar Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:38 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jiang Yun Thursday, September 27, 2012 3:20 PM
    Thursday, September 20, 2012 9:38 AM
  • Thanks to you all for the response. I will take a closer at it look and come back when i need more specific details. 
    Friday, September 21, 2012 8:32 AM
  • Hi,

    Take a look at CloudBerry Backup, it's widely used by many users to backup to Windows Azure as a destination.

    Also, you may even offer it to your customers, if you're a managed service provider.

    Cheers!

     

    Monday, September 2, 2013 9:06 AM