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DO I NEED NET FRAMEWORK BOTH 2 AND 3 INSTALED RRS feed

  • Question

  • I an trying to glean up my computer to free up disc space. I see I have both NET Framework 2 and NET Framework 3 installed do I need them both or can Framework 2 be uninstalled? Or is there an update for both and then get rid of both. I also want to uninstall office 97 as I now have 2007 but can not find the disc any ideas ?
    Thursday, September 2, 2010 10:34 PM

Answers

  • Hi LAUNDRYMAN,

    Firstly, we should know the relationship between .NET Framework 2.0 and .NET Framework 3.0

    The .NET Framework has two main components: the common language runtime (CLR) and the .NET Framework class library. The common language runtime is the foundation of the .NET Framework.
    Both .NET Framework 2.0 and 3.0 use CLR version 2.0. .NET 2.0 is the prerequisite of .NET 3.0.

    Here is one helpful blog that shows the relation, please see: http://www.danielmoth.com/Blog/net-framework-35.aspx .

    This means, if we want to keep .NET 3.0 on the machine, we need to have both .NET 2.0 and 3.0 together. .NET 2.0 cannot be removed.

    Moreover, referring to removal of any versions of the .NET Framework, it depends on the applications and OS that are ran on your PC.

    For OS, here is a useful blog that shows what version of .NET Framework is included in what version of OS. See: http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/archive/2007/03/14/mailbag-what-version-of-the-net-framework-is-included-in-what-version-of-the-os.aspx
    This means that we cannot remove the related .NET Framework since they are shipped with OS.

    For applications, we need the related .NET Framework to support our .NET applications. If you're not quite sure which .NET Framework is required, you should leave all the .NET Frameworks on your machine.

    Hope this helps! If you have any concern, please feel free to let me know.

    Best regards,
    Yichun Chen

    (This response contains a reference to a third party World Wide Web site. Microsoft is providing this information as a convenience to you. Microsoft does not control these sites and has not tested any software or information found on these sites; therefore, Microsoft cannot make any representations regarding the quality, safety, or suitability of any software or information found there. There are inherent dangers in the use of any software found on the Internet, and Microsoft cautions you to make sure that you completely understand the risk before retrieving any software from the Internet.)


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.
    Welcome to the All-In-One Code Framework! If you have any feedback, please tell us.
    • Marked as answer by Larcolais Gong Thursday, September 9, 2010 3:07 AM
    Friday, September 3, 2010 4:44 AM

All replies

  • Hi LAUNDRYMAN,

    Firstly, we should know the relationship between .NET Framework 2.0 and .NET Framework 3.0

    The .NET Framework has two main components: the common language runtime (CLR) and the .NET Framework class library. The common language runtime is the foundation of the .NET Framework.
    Both .NET Framework 2.0 and 3.0 use CLR version 2.0. .NET 2.0 is the prerequisite of .NET 3.0.

    Here is one helpful blog that shows the relation, please see: http://www.danielmoth.com/Blog/net-framework-35.aspx .

    This means, if we want to keep .NET 3.0 on the machine, we need to have both .NET 2.0 and 3.0 together. .NET 2.0 cannot be removed.

    Moreover, referring to removal of any versions of the .NET Framework, it depends on the applications and OS that are ran on your PC.

    For OS, here is a useful blog that shows what version of .NET Framework is included in what version of OS. See: http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/archive/2007/03/14/mailbag-what-version-of-the-net-framework-is-included-in-what-version-of-the-os.aspx
    This means that we cannot remove the related .NET Framework since they are shipped with OS.

    For applications, we need the related .NET Framework to support our .NET applications. If you're not quite sure which .NET Framework is required, you should leave all the .NET Frameworks on your machine.

    Hope this helps! If you have any concern, please feel free to let me know.

    Best regards,
    Yichun Chen

    (This response contains a reference to a third party World Wide Web site. Microsoft is providing this information as a convenience to you. Microsoft does not control these sites and has not tested any software or information found on these sites; therefore, Microsoft cannot make any representations regarding the quality, safety, or suitability of any software or information found there. There are inherent dangers in the use of any software found on the Internet, and Microsoft cautions you to make sure that you completely understand the risk before retrieving any software from the Internet.)


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.
    Welcome to the All-In-One Code Framework! If you have any feedback, please tell us.
    • Marked as answer by Larcolais Gong Thursday, September 9, 2010 3:07 AM
    Friday, September 3, 2010 4:44 AM
  • .Net Framework just make me mad!

     

    Please, help us understand this:

    Since "I" have the Windows XP Pro SP3 CD, which version of .Net do I need to run most programs?

     

    The options at MS download are:

    - 1.0 SP3

     

    - 1.1

    --- SP1

     

    - 2.0

    --- SP1

    --- SP2

     

    - 3.0

    --- SP1

     

    - 3.5

    --- SP1

     

    - 4.0

     

    Am I missing something?

    Which of those do I need to install to run most programs since I have the XP pro SP3 CD?

    Before e.g. installing the 3.5 SP1, do I need to install the 3.5? Does it apply to other like 2.0 SP2? (how to proceed?)

    Which do I need - Redistributable, Client, SDK, What?

     

    And a simple questions: Why Microsoft don't provide a single "package" to solve these issues?

    If we do a research, there are SEVERAL people complaining about it.

     

    Thanks,

    Thursday, October 21, 2010 2:21 AM