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Question about UML Drawing RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1871351342 posted

    I want to learn UML Draws but i want to know if it is important knowlage or it will wiste my time only

    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 7:40 AM

Answers

  • User-952121411 posted

    Really there is no proper answer to this.  I particularly think UML is a great language for designing and communicating an applications requirements to both business and technical people.  However, I think a lot of the times it depends more on the environment or company your work with.  Some companies subscribe to the different UML models and it works well for the team; in other companies UML is not used, so creating diagrams may be for just your own design.  I believe VS.NET 2010 and TFS have increased functionality for UML support indicating it is still widely used.

    IMO however, I do not think UML is obsolete by any means.  I just think its strength if use or application is based on where and who you are working with.  If you need any high level UML information take a look at the following link:

    http://www-01.ibm.com/software/rational/uml/

    Hope this helps! Smile

     

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 11:26 AM

All replies

  • User1563021683 posted

    Try Microsoft Visio. It might be helpful 

    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 8:40 AM
  • User-1871351342 posted

    I want to ask if Developers now adays use uml or it an old fasion

    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 10:35 AM
  • User-952121411 posted

    Really there is no proper answer to this.  I particularly think UML is a great language for designing and communicating an applications requirements to both business and technical people.  However, I think a lot of the times it depends more on the environment or company your work with.  Some companies subscribe to the different UML models and it works well for the team; in other companies UML is not used, so creating diagrams may be for just your own design.  I believe VS.NET 2010 and TFS have increased functionality for UML support indicating it is still widely used.

    IMO however, I do not think UML is obsolete by any means.  I just think its strength if use or application is based on where and who you are working with.  If you need any high level UML information take a look at the following link:

    http://www-01.ibm.com/software/rational/uml/

    Hope this helps! Smile

     

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 11:26 AM
  • User-389939489 posted

    You should learn about *modeling*, whatever tool you have at hand, paper and pen *not* excluded.

    Then, diagramming tools (and the standards they support) can make your life easier of course, but with a couple of strong provisions:

    1. For conceptual modeling (analysis) and talking to the business, keep in mind that informal diagramming and paper and pen remain the preferred approach;

    2. OTOH, UML (as it is today) is best for technical diagramming (design), i.e. the non-conceptual, not business oriented communication.

    HTH,

    -LV

    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 2:19 PM
  • User-952121411 posted

    UML (as it is today) is best for technical diagramming (design), i.e. the non-conceptual, not business oriented communication.
     

    I agree, however the one exception I have seen to this is the UML Use Case Diagram.  I have been in an environment where the business was encouraged to represent SMEs that would be able to work with IT on projects with the Use Case diagrams.  Any type of diagram beyond that was too complex for the average business user and strictly for technical purposes.  For additional business needs, plain old word documents typically would suffice.

    This helped bridge the gap in requirements communication difficulties that had been experienced often.  Typically caused by the business trying to create a 100 page Visio flow, representing their business process. The Use Case diagram offered a middle ground to help make requirements gathering and communication between technical and non-technical groups more seamless.

    Thursday, January 21, 2010 3:15 PM
  • User-389939489 posted

    atconway:

    > > UML (as it is today) is best for technical diagramming (design), i.e. the non-conceptual, not business oriented communication.

    > I agree, however the one exception I have seen to this is the UML Use Case Diagram. 

    Given that there is really no indication for conceptual modeling apart from the fact that it must document and communicate what it is supposed to: yes, you could even do that. The point remains that those kinds of notations and diagrams are simply not well suited to analysis, and UC diagrams (and even plain Use Cases) are not an exception there: that is so, not only because they are too low-level to understand, even more important is the fact that they just do not represent the *conceptual* side.

    > For additional business needs, plain old word documents typically would suffice.

    That is not really the case: the really important documents (in analysis as in design) are the pictures and the diagrams, not the textual descriptions. (Of course there are legal and similar needs, but that's beyond the present point.)

    > Typically caused by the business trying to create a 100 page Visio flow, representing their business process.

    You know, the major and most common problem nowadays is that we have forgotten what Analysis really is, and that it should be done by Analysts, not by the business guys, nor by anyone else...

    Kind regards,

    -LV

    Friday, January 22, 2010 2:38 PM
  • User-952121411 posted

    You know, the major and most common problem nowadays is that we have forgotten what Analysis really is, and that it should be done by Analysts, not by the business guys, nor by anyone else...
     

    That is true in an ideal world, but many companies do not have or do not want to put the resources into having a full blown Project Management with Analysts team.  In these cases, the developer himself or herself wears many hats including Analyst, SME, Architect, Developer, Tester, and Documenter. 

    I do not want to get too far off on a tangent from the original posters question.  There are no hard set rules in Software Development, and as we all know there are many, many ways to get something done.  I think we can all agree there are better ways than others in general, but disecting some topics to the nth degree can become more of a nit picking conversation and less productive.  Unless one owns thier own company and is the king of thier own domain, we must adapt and learn our environment and apply the best practices we can in that envrionment to get the job done well. I still stand by my earlier statements to the original poster, that UML modeling is by no means obsolete, and is a good tool to have.

    ...now LudovicoVan - you can have the last word as you always like to do.  Wink

    Friday, January 22, 2010 10:26 PM
  • User-389939489 posted

    atconway:

    > > You know, the major and most common problem nowadays is that we have forgotten what Analysis really is, and that it should be done by Analysts, not by the business guys, nor by anyone else...

    > That is true in an ideal world, but many companies do not have or do not want to put the resources into having a full blown Project Management with Analysts team.  In these cases, the developer himself or herself wears many hats including Analyst, SME, Architect, Developer, Tester, and Documenter.

    I too was refering to roles, as it should be obvious. That companies do not invest on analysis (in most cases they do not even really know what it is: and this includes the technicians) is indeed part of the problem I was mentioning.

    > I do not want to get too far off on a tangent from the original posters question.

    Then don't.

    > There are no hard set rules in Software Development, and as we all know there are many, many ways to get something done. 

    That is just another myth of our times, and a very strong one: but it is false, as most of what comes along with it. There is a discipline, there are principles, there are practices, and so on. Young developers should rather investigate the meaning of the word "engineering" -- and that of "quality", BTW.

    > I think we can all agree there are better ways than others in general, but disecting some topics to the nth degree can become more of a nit picking conversation and less productive.

    You have given an imprecise and overall incorrect answer to the OP. You can then call my answer to the OP and/or my replies to you "nit-picking" if you like, not my problem.

    >  Unless one owns thier own company and is the king of thier own domain, we must adapt and learn our environment and apply the best practices we can in that envrionment to get the job done well.

    Amen.

    > I still stand by my earlier statements to the original poster, that UML modeling is by no means obsolete, and is a good tool to have.

    As they say, you are surely entitled to your opinion. OTOH, you are implicitly attributing to me something I have neither said, nor implied.

    > ...now LudovicoVan - you can have the last word as you always like to do.

    Be serious.

    -LV

    Monday, January 25, 2010 2:59 PM