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How important is for architecture to be a good sketcher ? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Last year I discovered architecture and now I know it' s the most important thing for me ! The problem is that I am not sure that I can become an architect ... I am good at the technical part, I have good ideeas( as my teacher told me) but the artistic part is down and I'm worried ! I like this so much and I would do anything to improve my drawings ! In fact there is a certain improvent... but I 'm sure it's not enough... that's why I would like to know from someone who already practises architecture about the importance of the artistic  part of the projects after university ...
    Tuesday, April 24, 2007 8:21 PM

Answers

  • I think to a degree you are trying to walk before you can crawl. Being a good architecture in many ways is an Art rather than a science, however like all good arts you need to understand your subject matter. Drawings and diagrams are important as a form of communication with your teams, and project participants, I often do a quick sketch to communicate a point. However the level of drawing ability I am sure is not so high that anyone couldn't be taught. I do think that comming out of University and hoping to become and architect may be a little hopeful. I would suggest that an architect that has only been an architect is probably not the best person to have. I like to know an architect has spent some time with the troops down in the trenches. I like to know an architect has done the hard yards both technically, and that they have some business acume.

     

    I have run my own small consulting firm for instance with 6 employees, I did this at a realitively young age, and then decided I didn't like running a business but just enjoyed the architectual part of my job so sold the business (which was still profitable). This experince however gave me invaluable insite into how the owner of a company thinks, what is important to them and what induces fear in them. These are all things I need to understand as an architect.

     

    I suggest you finish Uni, get a job as a programmer or systems analyst, or even a business analyst for a while, then find a company that will employ you as a junior architect, working under a senior architect, and forget about your lack of artistic drawing abilities (and get a copy of Visio Wink.

    Thursday, April 26, 2007 1:26 AM
  • Communicating architecture isn't solely about drawings and sketches. Dana Bredemeyer and Ruth Malan have written a paper on "The Role of the Architect" which contains an interesting competency summary explaining what you know, what you do, and what you are. Great read!

    Back to your question... What I did, and still do is to carry a sketchbook with me and draw models of the envisioned architecture solution when I explain it to stakeholders. I explicitly redraw the picture each time and validate my drawings with the stakeholder reaction. After having explained the solution a couple of times and gathering valuable feedback I learn how to communicate the architecture effectively. After a while you'll find your own preferred drawing style which is, along with your other competencies, a great tool to add to your "architect toolbox".
    Monday, April 30, 2007 12:10 PM

All replies

  • I think to a degree you are trying to walk before you can crawl. Being a good architecture in many ways is an Art rather than a science, however like all good arts you need to understand your subject matter. Drawings and diagrams are important as a form of communication with your teams, and project participants, I often do a quick sketch to communicate a point. However the level of drawing ability I am sure is not so high that anyone couldn't be taught. I do think that comming out of University and hoping to become and architect may be a little hopeful. I would suggest that an architect that has only been an architect is probably not the best person to have. I like to know an architect has spent some time with the troops down in the trenches. I like to know an architect has done the hard yards both technically, and that they have some business acume.

     

    I have run my own small consulting firm for instance with 6 employees, I did this at a realitively young age, and then decided I didn't like running a business but just enjoyed the architectual part of my job so sold the business (which was still profitable). This experince however gave me invaluable insite into how the owner of a company thinks, what is important to them and what induces fear in them. These are all things I need to understand as an architect.

     

    I suggest you finish Uni, get a job as a programmer or systems analyst, or even a business analyst for a while, then find a company that will employ you as a junior architect, working under a senior architect, and forget about your lack of artistic drawing abilities (and get a copy of Visio Wink.

    Thursday, April 26, 2007 1:26 AM
  • I could not agree with TimSE2 more.  This is good advice.

     

    David Clausen

    Sunday, April 29, 2007 3:06 PM
  • Communicating architecture isn't solely about drawings and sketches. Dana Bredemeyer and Ruth Malan have written a paper on "The Role of the Architect" which contains an interesting competency summary explaining what you know, what you do, and what you are. Great read!

    Back to your question... What I did, and still do is to carry a sketchbook with me and draw models of the envisioned architecture solution when I explain it to stakeholders. I explicitly redraw the picture each time and validate my drawings with the stakeholder reaction. After having explained the solution a couple of times and gathering valuable feedback I learn how to communicate the architecture effectively. After a while you'll find your own preferred drawing style which is, along with your other competencies, a great tool to add to your "architect toolbox".
    Monday, April 30, 2007 12:10 PM