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[MS-OXOUM] Information on Fax and Missed.Voice RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I'm looking at MS-OXOUM v20100205, in preparation for some work in this area. I have a few questions.

    Q1. In section 2.1.2.2 and 2.1.2.3, there is a description of the use of the PidTagAttachLongFilename property. The suffix requirement appears to be case insensitive (since, for example, 2.1.2.2 says "The file extension MUST be ".WAV" for files in the WAV format,...", and 2.1.2.3 shows examples using "wm.wav", "vm3.wav" and so on). Is this the case? Is it legitimate for the PidTagVoiceMessageAttachmentOrder property to use different case to the PidTagAttachLongFilename?

    Q2. There is a discussion of fax messages and missed call notifications in Section 2.1.2.1, but no details on the format for these (e.g fax standard / encoding and any limitations), or the representation (e.g. attachment, body text or whatever).
    Q2a. What are the allowed / required formats for fax messages?
    Q2b. How are fax messages provided (e.g attachment) and are there any special properties that apply?
    Q2c. What is the format / representation for a Missed.Call message?
    Q2d. Is there a protocol example for a fax message?
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 4:02 AM

Answers

  • Hi Brad,

     

    I have the answers to your follow up questions:

    A.      Yes, it is the only image.  There are no special extensions.  To Outlook, a fax is just a message with the noted message class (so Outlook can display the fax icon).  And, that message has an attachment.  Examining at/interpreting the attachment is completely up to the client, and is covered in full by the general attachment viewing mechanism.  We have no contract with Outlook or any other client regarding the format of the attachment.  So, someone could build an Exchange replacement that saved faxes as GIF files and as long as the client/OS could read GIFs, Exchange would be unaffected.

     

    B.      There is nothing specific to the image format.  A fax message is an e-mail message with an image attachment, and Outlook does not do anything special with the image.  If Outlook knows how to view the image then that is given.  If not, the client is expected to use some external viewer.

     

    C.      That assumption is correct.

     

    I hope this resolves your follow up questions.

     

    Regards,

    Mark Miller

    Escalation Engineer

    US-CSS DSC PROTOCOL TEAM

    Friday, March 5, 2010 10:44 PM

All replies

  • Hi Brad,

    Thank you for your questions in regarding the [MS-OXOUM] protocol specification. 

    One of my cohorts from the Exchange protocol support team will be in touch with you shortly about your questions.


    Senior Consultant
    Sunday, February 14, 2010 9:53 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Brad,

    I took ownership of this issue and will investigate and get answers to your questions.

    Regards,
    Mark Miller
    Escalation Engineer

    US-CSS DSC PROTOCOL TEAM


    Wednesday, February 17, 2010 2:27 PM
  • Hi Brad,

    I have answers to your questions.

    Q1.  Suffix requirements are case insensitive, so the PidTagVoiceMessageAttachemntOrder property and the PidTagAttachLongFilename can have different case.

    Q2a – Qd.  Faxes are messages with the appropriate message class, reference [MS-OXOUM] section 2.1.2.1 Message Classes, and have an image attachment.  E12 saved the image as a TIFF file.  Other than that there is no required format for faxes (Q2a).  It’s just like a normal e-mail message with an image attachment, except the message class tells Outlook to show a special icon next to the message indicating it is a fax (Q2b).  The same is true for missed call notifications.  The message class tells Outlook that it’s a missed call and the body of the message contains information about the call (Q2c).  There are no special requirements.

     

    I hope this addresses your questions.

     

    Regards,

    Mark Miller

    Escalation Engineer

    US-CSS DSC PROTOCOL TEAM

    Wednesday, February 24, 2010 10:09 PM
  • Mark,

    Thanks for this. Q1 is resolved.

    A couple of followup clarifications on Q2:

    For Fax formats (Q2.a):
    A. Is TIFF the only allowed fax format? That is, is that the only thing any version of Exchange (or at least any version of Exchange covered by the Open Specifications) will generate for a fax? Are there MIcrosoft specific extensions present?

    B. TIFF is a fairly large format. Is anything in the TIFF 6.0 specification allowed / handled by Outlook? Are supplement 2 extensions allowed / handled by Outlook? Any variation between Outlook versions?

    For the Missed call notification (Q2.c):

    C. I'm assuming that the notification just text in the body (as obtained in accordance with MS-OXBBODY). Is this assumption correct?


    I think it would be useful for this information to go into a future update to MS-OXOUM too.

    Thanks again.

    Brad
    Friday, February 26, 2010 4:16 AM
  • Hi Brad,

    I'll delve into these follow up questions and get back in touch with you soon.

    Regards,

    Mark Miller

    Escalation Engineer

    US-CSS DSC PROTOCOL TEAM

    Friday, February 26, 2010 4:57 PM
  • Hi Brad,

     

    I have the answers to your follow up questions:

    A.      Yes, it is the only image.  There are no special extensions.  To Outlook, a fax is just a message with the noted message class (so Outlook can display the fax icon).  And, that message has an attachment.  Examining at/interpreting the attachment is completely up to the client, and is covered in full by the general attachment viewing mechanism.  We have no contract with Outlook or any other client regarding the format of the attachment.  So, someone could build an Exchange replacement that saved faxes as GIF files and as long as the client/OS could read GIFs, Exchange would be unaffected.

     

    B.      There is nothing specific to the image format.  A fax message is an e-mail message with an image attachment, and Outlook does not do anything special with the image.  If Outlook knows how to view the image then that is given.  If not, the client is expected to use some external viewer.

     

    C.      That assumption is correct.

     

    I hope this resolves your follow up questions.

     

    Regards,

    Mark Miller

    Escalation Engineer

    US-CSS DSC PROTOCOL TEAM

    Friday, March 5, 2010 10:44 PM
  • Mark,

    Thanks for the follow-up clarifications.

    Brad
    Saturday, March 6, 2010 2:40 AM