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Creating Transaction Processing System with Access RRS feed

  • Question

  • Does any body know how to create a transaction processing system with access to solve orders and payments matching database. How can we able to co-ordinate OLAP with Access 2013. How other ODBC databases be connected to Access 2013?


    DebACCESSDevM

    Thursday, May 26, 2016 6:30 AM

Answers

  • Hi MayurPise,

    >> Does any body know how to create a transaction processing system with access to solve orders and payments matching database

    You could try ADO, and use BeginTrans to begin a new transcation.

    # BeginTrans, CommitTrans, and RollbackTrans Methods (ADO)

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms680895(v=vs.85).aspx

    >> How can we able to co-ordinate OLAP with Access 2013. How other ODBC databases be connected to Access 2013?

    Do you mean you want to connect to OLAP from Access 2013? For ODBC database, you could use Import& Link function in Access or you could use ADO to connect ODBC database.

    # Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects Reference

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/jj249010.aspx

    Best Regards,

    Edward


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
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    Friday, May 27, 2016 5:22 AM
  • There is nothing inherently different as to how one might create a invoicing, or orders or payment system in Access or just about any other relational database system.

    Keep in mind that the term “transaction” has a meaning from a business point of view (ie: processing orders, payments etc. – commonly called business transactions).

    There is there is a database or software term “transaction”. Such a term means that some code can run and if after running the code then the data is either committed or not committed to the database tables.

    So don’t confuse the “general” term transaction which is an order, or invoice or purchase order or whatever. This “term” and context thus has little if anything to do with a database transaction.

    The context of your question is in the business sense, and not the technological sense from committing data to a table.

    So how you create a typical order system in Access, or Oracle, or MySQL or SQL server is all quite much the same. The starting point is a good data model.

    So to see such an application that can fulfill order transactions, inventory etc., try the long time running Access sampled called

    North wind traders.

    If you using say Access 2010, then go file->new. From the list of sample templates choose NorthWind.

    The main screen looks like this say to process an order transaction:

    As for OLAP, again that really just a fancy term for how you view data. So you build correct quires to revive the data in the format you wish to view that data. (it just a fancy term for viewing data the way you want or need). Often the data is summary data, and often it is stored as a data cube with time/date as a 3rd dimension, but in fact we just talking about viewing data.

    As for ODBC? That what we call Open Database Connectivity – it is just a term used to define a connection technology. Access supports ODBC, so Word, Excel or even other database systems can read and use Access data.

    I should point out that for YEARS the Simply Accounting package which had orders, invoicing, purchase orders etc. And the system of course kept track of sales etc., and WONDERS of wonders, Simply Accounting used the access database system. (you could actually use Access to open the simply accounting database). Later on, the company now called Sage uses a server based database system.

    So be it a simple “sample” order transaction system like the North wind traders, or building a full blown Accounting system that handles order, sales transactions etc., you can build such systems in Access or quite much any database system that tickles your fancy.

    So how you deal with business transactions in Access or any database is quite much the time. You want to read up on data normalizing – this applies to most database systems.

    Do a BinGoogle on database normalizing to get you started on how one goes about building data models for typical “transaction” based business systems.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Saturday, May 28, 2016 6:46 PM

All replies

  • Hi MayurPise,

    >> Does any body know how to create a transaction processing system with access to solve orders and payments matching database

    You could try ADO, and use BeginTrans to begin a new transcation.

    # BeginTrans, CommitTrans, and RollbackTrans Methods (ADO)

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms680895(v=vs.85).aspx

    >> How can we able to co-ordinate OLAP with Access 2013. How other ODBC databases be connected to Access 2013?

    Do you mean you want to connect to OLAP from Access 2013? For ODBC database, you could use Import& Link function in Access or you could use ADO to connect ODBC database.

    # Microsoft ActiveX Data Objects Reference

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/jj249010.aspx

    Best Regards,

    Edward


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.


    Friday, May 27, 2016 5:22 AM
  • There is nothing inherently different as to how one might create a invoicing, or orders or payment system in Access or just about any other relational database system.

    Keep in mind that the term “transaction” has a meaning from a business point of view (ie: processing orders, payments etc. – commonly called business transactions).

    There is there is a database or software term “transaction”. Such a term means that some code can run and if after running the code then the data is either committed or not committed to the database tables.

    So don’t confuse the “general” term transaction which is an order, or invoice or purchase order or whatever. This “term” and context thus has little if anything to do with a database transaction.

    The context of your question is in the business sense, and not the technological sense from committing data to a table.

    So how you create a typical order system in Access, or Oracle, or MySQL or SQL server is all quite much the same. The starting point is a good data model.

    So to see such an application that can fulfill order transactions, inventory etc., try the long time running Access sampled called

    North wind traders.

    If you using say Access 2010, then go file->new. From the list of sample templates choose NorthWind.

    The main screen looks like this say to process an order transaction:

    As for OLAP, again that really just a fancy term for how you view data. So you build correct quires to revive the data in the format you wish to view that data. (it just a fancy term for viewing data the way you want or need). Often the data is summary data, and often it is stored as a data cube with time/date as a 3rd dimension, but in fact we just talking about viewing data.

    As for ODBC? That what we call Open Database Connectivity – it is just a term used to define a connection technology. Access supports ODBC, so Word, Excel or even other database systems can read and use Access data.

    I should point out that for YEARS the Simply Accounting package which had orders, invoicing, purchase orders etc. And the system of course kept track of sales etc., and WONDERS of wonders, Simply Accounting used the access database system. (you could actually use Access to open the simply accounting database). Later on, the company now called Sage uses a server based database system.

    So be it a simple “sample” order transaction system like the North wind traders, or building a full blown Accounting system that handles order, sales transactions etc., you can build such systems in Access or quite much any database system that tickles your fancy.

    So how you deal with business transactions in Access or any database is quite much the time. You want to read up on data normalizing – this applies to most database systems.

    Do a BinGoogle on database normalizing to get you started on how one goes about building data models for typical “transaction” based business systems.

    Regards,

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Saturday, May 28, 2016 6:46 PM
  • You can create a transaction processing system with any database as long as you can “import” and “update” data between linked tables. You will, of course, also need some method of “locking” records in use.<o:p></o:p>

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    Wednesday, July 13, 2016 2:14 PM