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Question on Events RRS feed

  • Question

  • Does anyone know if each event is a subroutine on their own or does the C code behind them intermingle?

    Question is because I am still having trouble with an application written in 2.0, but not working in 365.

    Thanks

    Sunday, May 12, 2019 11:41 PM

Answers

  • I did not know that 2.0 was a different VBA, if you want to call it that.  Sine the tables have changed a little, I will check it out.

    Thanks

    Again

    • Marked as answer by VDSV Monday, May 13, 2019 1:13 PM
    Monday, May 13, 2019 1:04 PM

All replies

  • I don't know, but most likely the behaviour behind the scene in 365 is identical to that in 2.0.

    Some things - very few really - in a converted 2.0 application will behave in an unexpected matter in a converted application. If so, just modify it to behave as intended. For those I have converted, it hasn't been much.


    Gustav Brock

    Monday, May 13, 2019 7:12 AM
  • I wrote compilers for IBM so I have some idea.  We always had a problem with something call Field Record Relationship that gave us trouble. We changed to everything being sub routines except for the one item.  We tried to never go into sub-routines until we finished the part we work working on.  No matter how you cut it, you start with the connections, input processing and output.  The thing that is nice about assembler is that the output on reports was so easy, you never had to worry about headings, groups and detail functions.  I did the RPG II compiler for the System 32.  I really wish we would not have left the Assembler model, it was only 73 instructions so it was so easy to memorize. 

    The reason I asked about sub-routines is because if they bounce back and forth I can see where it is possible to lose contact, if not I may just re-program the whole application.

    I have liked most of the approaches that Microsoft took on Access except for the Report Module.  However saying this, that is not our problem.  It just does not seem to fire the event at all.

    I have an old Assembler Compiler that still works on real time applications but I no longer know how to call them.

    Thanks for you Assistance.

     
    Monday, May 13, 2019 11:27 AM
  • That makes sense, though the old Intel machines, Access 1.x and 2.0 was created for, were much different from System 32.

    But what is the unintended behaviour of your sub routines? Perhaps you could reveal one of these?

    Or, to be pragmatic, sometimes it is faster to program a stubborn routine "in another way" than trying to debug why it fails.


    Gustav Brock

    Monday, May 13, 2019 11:41 AM
  • Gustav;

    Thanks for your input, you have given me some ideas.  My problems are that when I go to the Sub-Routine by calling the VBA from the on Activate to the On Connect.  There were about eight instructions that stopped working on the activate event so I tried the On Connect event and that does not fire at all.

    The old application was part of a Web Page that we stopped using for the education industry.  Now they might want to resurrect it for the retired military veterans.

    Th On Connect event just never fires at all, it acts like the event is completely ignored.

    It is not serious because it has to do with appearance, but when women are in charge that is more important to them than it is to men.

    Thanx

    Monday, May 13, 2019 12:14 PM
  • But the OnConnect event is for Pivot tables only, thus normally doesn't fire, and it didn't exist in Access 2.0 (which used Access Basic, not VBA).

    Gustav Brock

    Monday, May 13, 2019 12:23 PM
  • I did not know that 2.0 was a different VBA, if you want to call it that.  Sine the tables have changed a little, I will check it out.

    Thanks

    Again

    • Marked as answer by VDSV Monday, May 13, 2019 1:13 PM
    Monday, May 13, 2019 1:04 PM
  • Gustav;

    I just studied the Pivot Table situation.  I can be critical, but will not.  The old Access 2.0 was a very large database, every high school and middle school teacher in Texas.  They went back to Oracle because it was getting too hard for the programmers to remember everything. 

    I used the same structure with the VA Medical situation, but my problem here is that there are so many regulations from around the world that I am having trouble coming up with codes in records to separate the countries and in the U.S. the States.

    I don not know if this database will ever get at large as Texas, but with the countries wanting so muck more on diagnosis it probably will.  I am going to close this until I get t play with this Pivot Table idea, something has changed for sure.

    Thanks for your help, you gave me some great ideas.

    Monday, May 13, 2019 1:12 PM
  • > I did not know that 2.0 was a different VBA, if you want to call it that. 

    Oh, it isn't me.

    This was before VBA. You (Microsoft) had BASIC (ROM), Quick Basic (DOS), and Visual Basic (Windows), thus the logical name for the Basic variant in Microsoft Access became Access Basic.

    Your tables should have been converted 100% as no original data type is obsolete.


    Gustav Brock

    Monday, May 13, 2019 1:16 PM