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Custom Grammar Dictionary RRS feed

  • Question

  • I need to find a way to have Word underline certain words (like it does for a spell check) which are not supposed to be used in certain contexts without actually removing them from the dictionary. Is there a way to have certain words appear in a spell check without actually removing them from the dictionary? And it would be even better if I could have the words underlined, then suggest a replacement based on my own custom criteria.

    To give an example, I'm trying to avoid saying any absolutes. For example:

    I want the word "guarantee" to be underlined in this context:

    "I guarantee all of my work is accurate"

    and if possible I would like the user to right-click the word gaurantee and see a suggestion to replace the word with "believe"

    So it would read

    "I believe all of my work is accurate"

    Any Ideas?

    Thanks, Andy

    Friday, July 27, 2012 3:10 PM

Answers

  • Andy - this kind of check is certainly possible using the new app model; and you could also encourage the use of boilerplate text that the app could place in the document to help the author follow your standards.

    Rather than integrating into the Word grammar/spell checker you might consider a task pane app that reads the document and applies your rules and then suggests appropriate modifications (which it could then apply) - think of this experience being more like an automatic document review with user comments than inline red/green squiggles - that way you could provide more context/education on the meanings and risks of certain words/phrases...

    I'd also recommend that you take a look at the new version of Exchange which includes "Data Loss Prevention", which is a set of technologies designed to help an enterprise apply governance to outbound messages. There is more on this topic here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj150527(v=exchg.150)

    Hope this helps...pc

    • Marked as answer by AndyRudy Friday, July 27, 2012 5:05 PM
    Friday, July 27, 2012 4:29 PM

All replies

  • Andy - this kind of check is certainly possible using the new app model; and you could also encourage the use of boilerplate text that the app could place in the document to help the author follow your standards.

    Rather than integrating into the Word grammar/spell checker you might consider a task pane app that reads the document and applies your rules and then suggests appropriate modifications (which it could then apply) - think of this experience being more like an automatic document review with user comments than inline red/green squiggles - that way you could provide more context/education on the meanings and risks of certain words/phrases...

    I'd also recommend that you take a look at the new version of Exchange which includes "Data Loss Prevention", which is a set of technologies designed to help an enterprise apply governance to outbound messages. There is more on this topic here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj150527(v=exchg.150)

    Hope this helps...pc

    • Marked as answer by AndyRudy Friday, July 27, 2012 5:05 PM
    Friday, July 27, 2012 4:29 PM
  • Patrick, thanks for the help! I'm glad to hear that it can be done.

    Is there any way you could point me in the right direction for how to develop a task pane app?

    P.S. The link you provided can't be found on my computer

    Thanks,

    Andy

    Friday, July 27, 2012 4:35 PM
  • Arrggghh - I always forget that rich text hyperlinking messes up that last ")" - try clicking the url again and then add the ")" at the end.

    This is a link to the task pane "getting started" <http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/apps/fp142161(v=office.15)> (don't forget to add that last ")" again :-)

    You can then use the Document object's "GetAllContentAsync" method (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/apps/fp179810(v=office.15)) to read the whole document (as text assuming you can ignore formatting) and then apply your rules to the results.

    I'd probably run a series of text searches/patterns using a regular expression to pull out offending words and phrases over the text you've retrieved, and then display a per-hit UX to get started.

    If you have large documents and want to get really fancy you could use structured documents (with content controls) and use the binding model to bind to those controls(http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/apps/fp123511(v=office.15)) to map back to the sections in the document.

    Hope this helps...pc

    Friday, July 27, 2012 5:03 PM