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Is Microsoft going to abandon further development of Linq to Sql and continues with Linq to Entities? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is Microsoft going to abandon further development of Linq to Sql and continues with Linq to Entities?

    My colleague says so...

    Thursday, March 24, 2011 3:58 PM

Answers

  •  The entity framework sits underneath both.


    No, it doesn't: L2S and EF are two separate frameworks. Both sits on top of ADO.NET (handling connections, commands, readers etc) but other than that there's nothing "shared" between them. L2S was developed by the C# team in parallell with EF, but was released before EF. After it was released, ownership was transferred so it is now owned and maintained by the same team at MSFT as EF.

    Being the "stepchild" (developed by another team) in the family of MS OR mappers it safe to assume that L2S will be getting a lot less attention than EF. It will probably not get any new features added, but there were a bunch of fixes and improvements to it made in .net 4.0. Some people like to refer to a product in "maintenance mode" as being "dead". Keep in mind: it is part of the .net framework and it is not going away anytime soon.

    If L2S covers your requirements you can safely use it; one comparison of L2S vs EF is Winforms vs WPF. Winforms is not dead, but it is not getting a lot of new features (if any). However, it is already stable so for many purposes it doesn't need any new features. The same applies to L2S; if it covers your requirements and unless you need some feature that is not there then it is perfectly fine to use it.

    A statement from the MSFT team responsible for both: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2008/10/29/update-on-linq-to-sql-and-linq-to-entities-roadmap.aspx 

    ...and an article in Redmond magazine commenting on it all: http://reddevnews.com/blogs/desmond-file/2008/12/digital-darwinism.aspx

     


     
       Cool tools for Linq-to-SQL and Entity Framework 4:
     huagati.com/dbmltools - Visual Studio add-in with loads of new features for the Entity Framework and Linq-to-SQL designers
     huagati.com/L2SProfiler - Runtime SQL query profiler for Linq-to-SQL and Entity Framework v4

    • Proposed as answer by Jackie-Sun Monday, March 28, 2011 9:06 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jackie-Sun Wednesday, March 30, 2011 6:45 AM
    Friday, March 25, 2011 8:09 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  •  The entity framework sits underneath both. There is more focus on LINQ to Entities because it can access 3rd party databases and IS newer. For most tasks LINQ-2-Entities (L2E) will do almost everything LINQ-2-SQL (L2S).

    Linq to SQL is now part of the framework so it is NOT going anywhere. Microsoft has stopped putting focus on research into L2S for L2E....from my personal standpoint though, L2E is just the latest version of L2S (albiet there are some fine differences).

     

    Here is a MSDN article on both outlining the differences and times you wish to use one over the other, since I work with SQL alot I still prodominently use L2S: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc161164.aspx


    Allan Merolla | BEng, JD, MCP | .NET/Sharepoint | My Blog at http://www.parallelfun.com/
    Friday, March 25, 2011 7:04 AM
  •  The entity framework sits underneath both.


    No, it doesn't: L2S and EF are two separate frameworks. Both sits on top of ADO.NET (handling connections, commands, readers etc) but other than that there's nothing "shared" between them. L2S was developed by the C# team in parallell with EF, but was released before EF. After it was released, ownership was transferred so it is now owned and maintained by the same team at MSFT as EF.

    Being the "stepchild" (developed by another team) in the family of MS OR mappers it safe to assume that L2S will be getting a lot less attention than EF. It will probably not get any new features added, but there were a bunch of fixes and improvements to it made in .net 4.0. Some people like to refer to a product in "maintenance mode" as being "dead". Keep in mind: it is part of the .net framework and it is not going away anytime soon.

    If L2S covers your requirements you can safely use it; one comparison of L2S vs EF is Winforms vs WPF. Winforms is not dead, but it is not getting a lot of new features (if any). However, it is already stable so for many purposes it doesn't need any new features. The same applies to L2S; if it covers your requirements and unless you need some feature that is not there then it is perfectly fine to use it.

    A statement from the MSFT team responsible for both: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2008/10/29/update-on-linq-to-sql-and-linq-to-entities-roadmap.aspx 

    ...and an article in Redmond magazine commenting on it all: http://reddevnews.com/blogs/desmond-file/2008/12/digital-darwinism.aspx

     


     
       Cool tools for Linq-to-SQL and Entity Framework 4:
     huagati.com/dbmltools - Visual Studio add-in with loads of new features for the Entity Framework and Linq-to-SQL designers
     huagati.com/L2SProfiler - Runtime SQL query profiler for Linq-to-SQL and Entity Framework v4

    • Proposed as answer by Jackie-Sun Monday, March 28, 2011 9:06 AM
    • Marked as answer by Jackie-Sun Wednesday, March 30, 2011 6:45 AM
    Friday, March 25, 2011 8:09 AM
    Answerer
  • Kristofer is right, I won't argue with someone who works on retail tools for LINQ =P

     

    I actually went ahead and generated L2S entities and L2E entities and that is the catch, I thought L2S entities were also Entity Framework classes but they are not. So I stand corrected on that point.

    Take care.


    Allan Merolla | BEng, JD, MCP | .NET/Sharepoint | My Blog at http://www.parallelfun.com/
    Monday, March 28, 2011 12:43 AM