none
Using app ID to make back end calls to an Access Database RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello - with Microsoft access I know you can have the backend of the database reside on a different drive from the front end portion of the database.  My question is, if you wanted to restrict user access to the back end data - could you remove user permissions from the back end database and have the front end of the database make calls using an application ID?  Or would the users need direct permissions to the back end database in order to be able to use it?
    • Edited by tastyhouse Tuesday, June 14, 2016 1:39 PM
    Tuesday, June 14, 2016 1:26 PM

Answers

  • Access is a file-based database. As such the security is not that advanced. If you want to protect your data you can have a look at MS SQL database which runs perfectly as backend to Access. It's more stable, can handle more users and you can fine-tune the security in a way that is impossible with Access. The Express edition is also free:

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sqlserver2014express.aspx

    You'll want Express with Tool which contains Management Studio for handling of the database.


    Best regards, George

    Tuesday, June 14, 2016 2:12 PM
  • Depending on the needs:

    You can create your own security model

    users
    permissions
    user permissions

    or

    users
    groups
    permissions
    group permissions
    user groups

    and then apply them to forms, reports

    but knowing that no matter what you do Access will never be completely secure, you could always migrate the SQL Server (Express) which can give you much more control.  More work, but more control. 

    If security is truly critical because of the sensitive nature of the data, then SQL Server is the way to go without a doubt.  If the data isn't sensitive, and you are simply trying to make your db more robust, then either option is viable.  I myself use the first option in almost all my dbs since I developed it in 2006 when I found out MS deprecate user-level security in accdbs.  It works very well and once setup is easy to work with and adjust.


    Daniel Pineault, 2010-2012 Microsoft MVP
    http://www.cardaconsultants.com
    MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net

    Tuesday, June 14, 2016 2:33 PM

All replies

  • Access is a file-based database. As such the security is not that advanced. If you want to protect your data you can have a look at MS SQL database which runs perfectly as backend to Access. It's more stable, can handle more users and you can fine-tune the security in a way that is impossible with Access. The Express edition is also free:

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sqlserver2014express.aspx

    You'll want Express with Tool which contains Management Studio for handling of the database.


    Best regards, George

    Tuesday, June 14, 2016 2:12 PM
  • Depending on the needs:

    You can create your own security model

    users
    permissions
    user permissions

    or

    users
    groups
    permissions
    group permissions
    user groups

    and then apply them to forms, reports

    but knowing that no matter what you do Access will never be completely secure, you could always migrate the SQL Server (Express) which can give you much more control.  More work, but more control. 

    If security is truly critical because of the sensitive nature of the data, then SQL Server is the way to go without a doubt.  If the data isn't sensitive, and you are simply trying to make your db more robust, then either option is viable.  I myself use the first option in almost all my dbs since I developed it in 2006 when I found out MS deprecate user-level security in accdbs.  It works very well and once setup is easy to work with and adjust.


    Daniel Pineault, 2010-2012 Microsoft MVP
    http://www.cardaconsultants.com
    MS Access Tips and Code Samples: http://www.devhut.net

    Tuesday, June 14, 2016 2:33 PM
  • Not disagreeing with the other advice already given.  Access offers encrypted & password protection for the back end file.  Be sure to explore that to see if it meets your needs.  It is simple to experiment with a copy of the file.

    Wednesday, June 15, 2016 1:23 PM