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looking for a clear definition of sharepoint custom development RRS feed

  • Question

  • Guys I always here Sharepoint developers talking about creating solution packages I know this makes adding custom code to Sharepoint production servers a lot easier. However, I'm a little unclear on the definition of custom development basically I would like to know when should your developers be packaging there code as Sharepoint solutions. I'm assuming custom development is when you go in an add code to the system for example I decide to take Sharepoint designer open up a aspx page and proceed to type in custom code. For example, lets say a developer creates an Infopath form that allows field agents to enter orders should that be packaged as a solution?  On second thought I would really consider the Infopath forum as out of the box functionality thus not being custom code. So what do you guys think
    Sunday, August 2, 2009 1:53 PM

Answers

  • I usually divide "customization" into three or four tiers, each based on the level of support and risk:

    Configuration:
      What the web admin, the site collection admin and the site owner can do from the Site Actions menu and the list's Settings menu. This includes adding, removing and customizing web parts using Edit Page.

    Customization:
      What the site collection admin and the site owner can do using SharePoint Designer. Basically what can be changed, damaged and undone using SPD, including custom HTML, CSS, edit form customization, custom web part pages and "branding" in general.  This also includes SPD workflows.

    Advanced Customization:
      What a "designer" can do, just short of C# or VB, but requires deployment to the server. This includes custom themes, server wide deployment of list and site templates and deployment of third party web parts, features and templates using Solution Packages.  (Includes code and other files, but has been well tested and proven elsewhere.)

    Development:
      Anything requiring deployment of custom DLLs, custom ASPX pages or custom web services. Typically Visual Studio work. This is high risk, can crash the servers, can kill performance, type of work.  ;-)



    Mike Smith TechTrainingNotes.blogspot.com
    Sunday, August 2, 2009 5:02 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    It's a bit of philosophical question, but I generally agree with you that a custom development is when one starts up Visual Studio and writes C# (or VB.NET) code.

    In InfoPath one can also write custom code, for example using VSTO.

    Peter
    Sunday, August 2, 2009 2:05 PM
  • Peter thanks for the reply another reason I brought this up is because of a situation at work. A department wanted to be able to see all of there open help desk tickets displayed in Sharepoint the helpdesk system lives in a sql database so one of the developers tied it in by opening up a aspx page via Sharepoint designer and making code changes there. I thought that this should have been connected via the business data catalog and displayed via bdc webparts. So it seems like the original approach of working through this problem is custom development
    Sunday, August 2, 2009 4:32 PM
  • I usually divide "customization" into three or four tiers, each based on the level of support and risk:

    Configuration:
      What the web admin, the site collection admin and the site owner can do from the Site Actions menu and the list's Settings menu. This includes adding, removing and customizing web parts using Edit Page.

    Customization:
      What the site collection admin and the site owner can do using SharePoint Designer. Basically what can be changed, damaged and undone using SPD, including custom HTML, CSS, edit form customization, custom web part pages and "branding" in general.  This also includes SPD workflows.

    Advanced Customization:
      What a "designer" can do, just short of C# or VB, but requires deployment to the server. This includes custom themes, server wide deployment of list and site templates and deployment of third party web parts, features and templates using Solution Packages.  (Includes code and other files, but has been well tested and proven elsewhere.)

    Development:
      Anything requiring deployment of custom DLLs, custom ASPX pages or custom web services. Typically Visual Studio work. This is high risk, can crash the servers, can kill performance, type of work.  ;-)



    Mike Smith TechTrainingNotes.blogspot.com
    Sunday, August 2, 2009 5:02 PM