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Import 2-hour dvd to EW4 RRS feed

  • Question

  • It has been so long since I added video to a site that I cannot remember how to do it.  I have a DVD with a two-hour video. First of all, is that too long to put on a website?  Secondly, please guide me through the steps needed to install the DVD video in EW.

     

    Thanks!


    Jim Buffington
    Friday, January 20, 2012 1:51 AM

All replies

  • 1. Yes

    2. No. To be a Web developer, you must actually do Web development. What did you plan to do—come here and have experienced, knowledgeable developers do your job for you?

     


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    Friday, January 20, 2012 1:55 AM
  • 1. Ditto

    2. Ditto. If you market yourself as a web developer you have to do your own legwork (or at least google the topic for the myriad sources of such instructions that already exist).


    Comic Sans walks into a bar. The bartender says, "Get out! We don't serve your type."
    Friday, January 20, 2012 3:03 AM
  • I disagree. It's not too long to put on the Internet, provided you have the bandwidth to host it, both in speed and bits. It's likely that you don't unless you are paying a LOT for your hosting. If you are going to host something like this, IIS Smooth Streaming is a great solution.

     


    Jim Cheshire -- Microsoft
    Friday, January 20, 2012 1:34 PM
    Moderator
  • Amazon has a service for this that can support fast streaming and HD. Many sites use Amazon video hosting services. They are supposed to be very cheap and reliable.

    Once you download the video to the server its just a matter of a link.

     

    Friday, January 20, 2012 2:26 PM
  • No Bob, it isn't just a matter of a link.

    You need to convert the DVD to a format that will stream and will work cross browser/platform. That is more complex than most think since there isn't a single codec that is supported by IE, Firefox, Safari and Chrome. You need Silverlight or Flash AND HTML 5 with the appropriate fallbacks to cover all browsers.

    Given the serious bandwidth that my tutorial video can eat up even using Silverlight and IIS just in time streaming I wouldn't recommend putting a full 2 hour dvd up.


    Free Expression Web Tutorials
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    Friday, January 20, 2012 4:45 PM
  • I disagree. It's not too long to put on the Internet, provided you have the bandwidth to host it, both in speed and bits. It's likely that you don't unless you are paying a LOT for your hosting. If you are going to host something like this, IIS Smooth Streaming is a great solution.


    Jim Cheshire -- Microsoft

    Yes, I gather from Cheryl's comments about the hosting bandwidth costs for her "Build a Basic Web Site" video tutorial, the excellent one that so many forum participants here have benefited from, that it is not a trivial consideration.

    So, call it a personal opinion, then, but I would never put media of that length and bandwidth requirement up. Having experienced (and currently, unavoidably, experiencing ;-) mobile bandwidth limitations (on a cellular 3G network), and its decidedly unreliable, sporadic connectivity characteristics, I would never presume that the visitor had the bandwidth required, or could maintain a connection long enough (think...dropped cell phone conversations...) to view or transfer such a chunk of media successfully.

    Granted, the majority of visitors might be on their gigabit Ethernet hookups at their homes or offices. But, with the growing popularity of mobile platforms—tablets, netbooks, e-readers such as Nooks and Kindles, smartphones, etc.—you can't count on it. And, since users tend to put off problems caused by such issues on what they perceive to be the source, the Web site developer (as illustrated by Cheryl's experience), I frankly don't think it's worth the hassle. Of course, as always, YMMV...   ;-)

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    • Edited by paladyn Friday, January 20, 2012 5:36 PM
    Friday, January 20, 2012 5:35 PM
  • I would never presume that the visitor had the bandwidth required, or could maintain a connection long enough (think...dropped cell phone conversations...) to view or transfer such a chunk of media successfully.


    I think Netflix might disagree with you. :) I regularly stream Netflix over a 3G connection on my phone and on my iPad. Works really well.
    Jim Cheshire -- Microsoft
    Friday, January 20, 2012 7:06 PM
    Moderator
  • Maybe so. I'll grant that others may have better experiences than I have had. But, here at the VA CLC in Northern Kentucky where I'm located, only Virgin Mobile and Cricket 3G services were available (unless I was prepared to incur a two-year contract for a two-month hospital stay), and neither offers sufficient bandwidth or reliability to even watch short videos such as those at YouTube without excessive buffering, and frequent failure to even complete.

    So, while it may indeed be possible for some folks to have a better experience, my own demonstrably disappointing results from cellular data connections would lead me to avoid presuming that a positive outcome would be likely.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    Friday, January 20, 2012 7:26 PM
  • Yeah Jim, and I regularly get requests from Netflix asking about the quality of my online viewing experience when I can connect. When I'm in Breckenridge, CO I was unable to watch Netflix on my iPad or other device that I routinely watch in Houston despite having what is supposed to be a 5gb connection. Oh and I cannot watch Netflix on the Mac Powerbook I keep up in Breckenridge because their method of streaming isn't compatible with PowerPC processors so watching it on that computer which works well for say Amazon Prime or Flash videos which is one reason I mentioned incompatible codecs cross browser. Clearly Netflix made a decision not to support older Macs despite the fact that I'm running only a two year old OS on that machine. They hard coded to specific processors.

    That is on a service dedicated to streaming video with lots and lots of hardware and infrastructure behind it not your typical website.

    I won't even try and watch Netflix on anything that isn't connected to a high speed wifi/ethernet with relatively few devices connected to it. At a coffee shop or on cellular not a chance.

    In my case because I was creating tutorials for a Windows only application I made the decision not worry about any non-MS operating system (even though it will still run on Macs.)


    Free Expression Web Tutorials
    For an Expression Web forum with without the posting issues try expressionwebforum.com
    Friday, January 20, 2012 8:00 PM
  • I know what you mean. We definitely don't live in a world where the quality of Internet connections are the same across geographical regions. However, many people are able to stream large video files reliably over 1mbps+ connections. If the OP is concerned with that kind of thing, IIS Smooth Streaming would be a great choice because it will change the video feed on the fly based on bandwidth.

     


    Jim Cheshire -- Microsoft
    Friday, January 20, 2012 8:19 PM
    Moderator
  • Hot Dang! I can tell you about using bandwidth like no other. Our twin daughters have had a Shoutcast internet radio station since 2007 and we finally had to put them on a dedicated server just for their web site. They not only stream on Shoutcast 24 x7 they also do a lot of live streaming on their web site.

    They streamed a video of a live concert they did with their DJ's several years ago and their host said it made their dedi almost cry tears it was taking so many hits at one time.

    I would listen to the suggestions you've received and then find a host that can handle your bandwidth for you. We're fortunate that the girls host cuts them a deal because they spot them for 5 seconds every 30 minutes when the DJ's are streaming live.

    They also upload all their web site music files in a zip format and then unzip it on their server. They use a Shoutcast hosting company for their Shoutcast streams and that's more big bucks.

    Saturday, January 21, 2012 6:33 AM
  • "And, since users tend to put off problems caused by such issues on what they perceive to be the source, the Web site developer "

    Heh heh. Unless your visitors are on the older side and not too computer litereate (like mine -- timeshare owners)

    They usually think whatever goes wrong was something they did.

    I get cut a lot of slack :=)



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    Saturday, January 21, 2012 12:57 PM