locked
WDP not for the virtual machine

    General discussion

  • I have discussed this point in a couple of other threads, but now I must reiterate. There are apparently quite a number of people downloading WDP to install it in a virtual machine of their choice for testing, and maybe even developing apps. From the viewpoint of someone who installed it originally on physical hardware with a decent windows performance index of 5.5, I can now say with certainty that installing it in a virtual machine will give you a false representation of the hard work Microsoft's engineers have put forth. The most glaring example of this is the performance of the Piano app on the Metro screen. Although VMware now supports installation of WDP, and their virtual hardware supports the Aero desktop environment, and my virtual machine was given a generous share of RAM, and my virtual machine is using the full capability of 2 CPU cores, performance in full-screen Metro apps is very lacking. The Piano app is for all practical purposes useless. There is a delay between pressing a key and hearing the sound, the graphics are choppy, and there is an entire octave on the keyboard that does nothing at all. Had I not already seen how brilliant this app performs on good physical hardware, I would think Microsoft had written a horrible app. My point is this. Please don't do Microsoft the injustice of taking your first impressions of WDP from a virtual machine. Test drive it on real hardware. You might think your virtual machine works great, and your Piano app may even work correctly, but if you haven't seen WDP on real hardware, you haven't seen WDP.

    Thursday, October 27, 2011 2:08 AM

All replies

  • I also think this further supports the point I made in another post when I stated that it would probably be a bad idea to develop Metro apps in a virtual machine. I've said what I wanted. Now I leave the floor to all of those VM addicts to tear my words to pieces and point out the many reasons I have no idea what I'm talking about.
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 2:16 AM
  • I have discussed this point in a couple of other threads, but now I must reiterate. There are apparently quite a number of people downloading WDP to install it in a virtual machine of their choice for testing, and maybe even developing apps. From the viewpoint of someone who installed it originally on physical hardware with a decent windows performance index of 5.5, I can now say with certainty that installing it in a virtual machine will give you a false representation of the hard work Microsoft's engineers have put forth. The most glaring example of this is the performance of the Piano app on the Metro screen. Although VMware now supports installation of WDP, and their virtual hardware supports the Aero desktop environment, and my virtual machine was given a generous share of RAM, and my virtual machine is using the full capability of 2 CPU cores, performance in full-screen Metro apps is very lacking. The Piano app is for all practical purposes useless. There is a delay between pressing a key and hearing the sound, the graphics are choppy, and there is an entire octave on the keyboard that does nothing at all. Had I not already seen how brilliant this app performs on good physical hardware, I would think Microsoft had written a horrible app. My point is this. Please don't do Microsoft the injustice of taking your first impressions of WDP from a virtual machine. Test drive it on real hardware. You might think your virtual machine works great, and your Piano app may even work correctly, but if you haven't seen WDP on real hardware, you haven't seen WDP.


    Hi there,

    just a few words to say that i STRONGLY AGREE with you, any Virtual test of an OS performance is just pointless.

    if you want to test drive any Operating System, you have to give it the hardware it needs, not emulated one! after that you can play with emulation/virtualization if the need is felt for any of the GOOD reasons it is meant to be.

    But never, never trust virtualization, be that on HyperV, VM Ware, Sun or Virtual box, to make yourself a fisrt opinion of any OS, be it MS, Linux or Mac OS...

    best regards,

     

    PierrE.

     


    Http://www.redkaffe.com - Consultant/Formateur en region PACA
    Thursday, October 27, 2011 2:24 PM
  • Hey thanks, Pierre. I couldn't have said it better, myself.
    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 2:39 AM