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How to open a mdt file RRS feed

  • Question

  • I got some data whose extesion is "mdt". The data are the Microsoft Office Add-in data.

    But I tied to use the Access (both the 2010 version and 2003 version) to open the data set. The Access tells me that it can not recognize the file, so I cannot open it.

    I wonder why I cannot open the data? Can anybody help? Thanks a lot!

    Thursday, November 16, 2017 4:03 AM

Answers

  • On my system, the .mdt extension is defined as "Access.WizardDataFile", and I am able to open the few that I found -- ACCWZUSR.mdt and ACCWZDAT.mdt -- with Access 2010.  However, to do so I have to select "All files (*.*)" in the filetype box of the Open dialog.  Did you try that?

    The .mdt files that are distributed with Access are used by the built-in wizards, and wouldn't normally contain data that an end-user would want to modify.

    Of course, anyone can give any file any extension they want, so there's no guarantee that the .mdt file you have is really a wizard data file.


    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    Access tips: www.datagnostics.com/tips.html

    • Proposed as answer by Tony---- Monday, November 20, 2017 7:41 AM
    • Marked as answer by Johnna_4 Monday, November 20, 2017 9:14 AM
    Friday, November 17, 2017 5:15 PM

All replies

  • Hello,

    I do not find any related Official document about mdt file. How do you get the file? Could you confirm it is Microsoft Office Add in data file? Do you try to open the file using Notepad?  

    Regards,

    Celeste


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Friday, November 17, 2017 7:08 AM
    Moderator
  • On my system, the .mdt extension is defined as "Access.WizardDataFile", and I am able to open the few that I found -- ACCWZUSR.mdt and ACCWZDAT.mdt -- with Access 2010.  However, to do so I have to select "All files (*.*)" in the filetype box of the Open dialog.  Did you try that?

    The .mdt files that are distributed with Access are used by the built-in wizards, and wouldn't normally contain data that an end-user would want to modify.

    Of course, anyone can give any file any extension they want, so there's no guarantee that the .mdt file you have is really a wizard data file.


    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    Access tips: www.datagnostics.com/tips.html

    • Proposed as answer by Tony---- Monday, November 20, 2017 7:41 AM
    • Marked as answer by Johnna_4 Monday, November 20, 2017 9:14 AM
    Friday, November 17, 2017 5:15 PM
  • Hello,

    I got the data from a teacher. I tried to use the Notepad++ open it, but all I can see is just messy code. I am sure it is mdt file since the "file attribute" tells me it is a Microsoft Access Add-in Data file.

    I searched the Internet and got some information:

    A file with the MDT file extension is a Microsoft Access Add-in Data file, used by Access and its add-ins for storing relevant data.

    Although Microsoft Access uses both file types, an MDT file shouldn't be confused with the MDB format that Access uses to store database information, unless your particular MDT file happens to be an old Microsoft Access 97 template file.

    An MDT file may instead be a GeoMedia Access Database Template file, which is a format used by the GeoMedia geospatial processing software to create an MDB file out of its data.

    How To Open an MDT File

    Microsoft Access opens files that are in the MDT format.

    If your MDT file isn't a Microsoft Access Data file, then it's most likely used by Hexagon's GeoMedia Smart Client.

    A simple text editor should be able to open MDT files that are produced from video converters or video editors. You probably only need to open this kind of MDT file if you're not sure where the program is storing the video file, since the location of the video is stored in the MDT file.Notepad++ is a good choice for viewing these types of MDT files.

    Note: Notepad++ (or any text editor) might be useful even if your MDT file isn't saved in any of these formats. Just open the file in the text editor and see if there's any header information or readable text anywhere throughout the file that indicates what program was used to create it. This can help you research software that supports opening that specific file.

    If you find that an application on your PC does try to open the MDT file but it's the wrong application or if you would rather have another installed program open them, see my How To Change the Default Program for a Specific File Extension guide for making that change in Windows.

    From:  https://www.lifewire.com/mdt-file-2621977

    Maybe I should try to use the older version of Access that before 2003?

    Anyway, thank you!

    Monday, November 20, 2017 2:34 AM
  • Hello, thank you for your answer!

    I tried to use both the 2003 and 2010 version of Access, and yes, I have to select "All files (*.*)" in the filetype box of the Open dialog. If I don't do that, I can not see the data in the folder. I also find the ACWZUSR.mdt and ACWZDAT.mdt file in the "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office" folder, and I can succesfully open these two data sets with Access 2010.

    Yeah, maybe the data has the restriction that made it only can be used in the orignal computer. I notice that along with the ACWZDAT.mdt file, there is another file shares the same name but in the different format. It is the Microsoft Access Record-Locking Information (.ldb) data.

    Maybe the file shares the same name but in the .ldb format is needed to open the .mdt file. And my teacher failed to send it to me.

    This kind of format is rarely seen, few people know about it. Thank you so much for your effort in helping me!


    • Edited by Johnna_4 Monday, November 20, 2017 3:05 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Tony---- Monday, November 20, 2017 7:41 AM
    Monday, November 20, 2017 3:05 AM
  • Hi Johnna_4,

    Is there any other issue? If not, I would suggest you mark the helpful reply as answer which is the way to close a thread here.

    If there is, please feel free to let us know.

    Regards,

    Tony


    Help each other

    Monday, November 20, 2017 7:41 AM
  • Yeah, maybe the data has the restriction that made it only can be used in the orignal computer. I notice that along with the ACWZDAT.mdt file, there is another file shares the same name but in the different format. It is the Microsoft Access Record-Locking Information (.ldb) data.

    Maybe the file shares the same name but in the .ldb format is needed to open the .mdt file. And my teacher failed to send it to me.

    This kind of format is rarely seen, few people know about it.

    For Access files, there is no way to restrict use to a single computer, so that is not the problem.

    An .ldb file is a temporary file created by Access whenever a database file is opened.  It's the "lock" file that Access uses to coordinate reads and writes to the file, and is automatically deleted by Access when the last user exits the database.  Sometimes it's left behind if Access crashes.  However, it's not something that you have to be given in order to open any kind of Access database, since Access creates and destroys it.

    The .mdt extension isn't anything special;  as used by Access, it's just a regular .mdb file with a different extension.  However, you have to bear in mind that (a) the same file extension can be used by different programs, for different file formats, and (b) any one can rename a file to any file extension they want.  The extension itself isn't magic; it just gives you (and Windows) some idea what program *ought* to open this file.

    The fact that you can open ACWZDAT.mdt with Access but not this file suggests one of three possibilities to me:

    1. The file is not an Access data file of any kind, although it has the .mdt extension.
    2. The file was an Access data file, but has been corrupted.  If you opened it with Word, I think that would have corrupted it, even if you didn't save the file afterward.  If you opened it in some other program, such as Notepad++, and then saved the file from that program, that would almost certainly have corrupted it.

    3. The file is an Access data file, but maybe in a format that is not supported by the versions of Access that you've used to try to open it.  That seems less likely, since you say you tried Access 2010 and 2003, but it's possible.

    If you want to post the file somewhere I can download it, I could have a look at it to see if I can figure out what it is.


    Dirk Goldgar, MS Access MVP
    Access tips: www.datagnostics.com/tips.html

    Tuesday, November 21, 2017 5:02 PM