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Is it worth to read this book and practice (Aspiring to become a Senior .Net Dev) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi I'm aspiring to become a senior .Net developer, and I found a book called "Programming .NET Components, 2nd Edition Second Edition by Juval Lowy" and just want to know if it's worth to read the book as it's talking about .net component in general (so it's a very rare book teaching .Net components, not sure WHY !!!**)

    Indeed, I'm looking to read up any book that contains advanced concept of .Net to improve my skills to become a senior dev, and I found the above book.

    1) Can anyone tell me if it's worth to read it up to have advanced skills?

    2) Is .Net component worth to learn today??

    3) If you know any advanced books out there, please send me the links

    4) I also read in the book that the author of the book is recognized by Microsoft as Software Legend

    5) I have never seen such a book in .net, so it's a rare book teaching .Net components !!!

    So I personally (OP) consider myself as a Mid-Level developer specially in C#, but I'm more advanced in VB.Net than C# as I started programming with VB6 7 years ago and moved up to VB.Net... and 3 years ago only I started working on C# but I found many similarity but I'm not that advanced in C# than I am in VB.Net.

    The below is writing regarding the author of the book

    He is Microsoft's Regional Director for the Silicon Valley, working with Microsoft to help the industry adopt .NET. Juval participates in the Microsoft internal design review for future versions of .NET and related technologies.

    Also please guys, don't be to tough on me while replying !!! please be gently as I just want to learn more


    Christine

    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:29 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Looking at the books table of contents it looks like a lot of its content is somewhat dated.

    C# and .NET has evolved enormously since 2005. 15 years is a lifetime in software development. I'm not saying that the book is bad. It's concepts and ideas could still be relevant today. I'm afraid the code samples and specifics about multithreading, parallelism, serialization, remoting, security and web services will probably be less relevant.

    Another difficulty is that .NET has a much wider ecosystem today than it had 15 years ago. What are you most interested in? .NET, .NET Core and the C# language itself? Web-based technologies like ASP.NET? Frontend technologies like WPF, WinForms or Xamarin?

    Since .NET Core, there is a lot of blogs and documentation on the internet. You will probably need more than one book to cover all the topics. There are also a lot of nice, up-to-date courses on platforms like Pluralsight or Udemy.

    Kind regards,

    Johnny Hooyberghs

    • Marked as answer by Christine25 Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:07 PM
    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:38 PM
  • Hello,

    First consideration is, if currently working as a developer what type of applications are in demand and what expectations for applications in the next two years in your location?

    Strive to become a solid developer in present and future technologies using Microsoft online documentation as a go to place for information

    If applicable learn TDD (Test Driven Development) or just learn it. 

    Don't rely on books so much as every author puts their own twist on what they are teaching along with books become outdated very fast today.

    Consider a subscription to Pluralsight for learning various skills but only do this if you are committed to do this very often e.g. every day work through a course, hone skills then move on to another course.

    Technology wise you can't go wrong learning Azure, SQL-Server, .NET Core, HTML5, Jquery, CSS (and for these three take deep dives) and responsive design.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmarked them if they provide no help, this will help others who are looking for solutions to the same or similar problem. Contact via my Twitter (Karen Payne) or Facebook (Karen Payne) via my MSDN profile but will not answer coding question on either.

    NuGet BaseConnectionLibrary for database connections.

    StackOverFlow
    profile for Karen Payne on Stack Exchange

    • Marked as answer by Christine25 Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:07 PM
    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:57 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello,

    First consideration is, if currently working as a developer what type of applications are in demand and what expectations for applications in the next two years in your location?

    Strive to become a solid developer in present and future technologies using Microsoft online documentation as a go to place for information

    If applicable learn TDD (Test Driven Development) or just learn it. 

    Don't rely on books so much as every author puts their own twist on what they are teaching along with books become outdated very fast today.

    Consider a subscription to Pluralsight for learning various skills but only do this if you are committed to do this very often e.g. every day work through a course, hone skills then move on to another course.

    Technology wise you can't go wrong learning Azure, SQL-Server, .NET Core, HTML5, Jquery, CSS (and for these three take deep dives) and responsive design.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmarked them if they provide no help, this will help others who are looking for solutions to the same or similar problem. Contact via my Twitter (Karen Payne) or Facebook (Karen Payne) via my MSDN profile but will not answer coding question on either.

    NuGet BaseConnectionLibrary for database connections.

    StackOverFlow
    profile for Karen Payne on Stack Exchange

    Thanks Karen.

    Indeed, in my workplace, we do web app in ASP.Net MVC (most) and ASP.Net Core (few); backend in C#.

    So, How Can I download updated offline official MSDN documentation for ASP.Net MVC and ASP.Net Core please?  Also if there's a PDF it would be fine.

    Can you provide me with a link to the offline MSDN doc please?

    So you said about If applicable learn TDD (Test Driven Development) or just learn it.

    Is it worth to learn it? can you please provide me some reason or professional value / experience to learn it; Aslo some drawbacks if I don't learn it??



    Christine

    • Marked as answer by Christine25 Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:07 PM
    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:11 PM
  • Hi Christine25, 

    Thank you for posting here.

    You can read Microsoft's online documentation  , blogs ( like .NET Blog ) , and other documentations at any time to get the useful information you need.

    If you have any problems in .NET, You can search online for answers or ask questions in the appropriate forum.

    Besides, For more information about TDD, you can refer to the following references.

    What is the future of test-driven development?

    Is test driven development the only future of software testing?

    Hope them can help you.

    Best Regards,

    Xingyu Zhao


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, October 9, 2019 7:37 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    Looking at the books table of contents it looks like a lot of its content is somewhat dated.

    C# and .NET has evolved enormously since 2005. 15 years is a lifetime in software development. I'm not saying that the book is bad. It's concepts and ideas could still be relevant today. I'm afraid the code samples and specifics about multithreading, parallelism, serialization, remoting, security and web services will probably be less relevant.

    Another difficulty is that .NET has a much wider ecosystem today than it had 15 years ago. What are you most interested in? .NET, .NET Core and the C# language itself? Web-based technologies like ASP.NET? Frontend technologies like WPF, WinForms or Xamarin?

    Since .NET Core, there is a lot of blogs and documentation on the internet. You will probably need more than one book to cover all the topics. There are also a lot of nice, up-to-date courses on platforms like Pluralsight or Udemy.

    Kind regards,

    Johnny Hooyberghs

    • Marked as answer by Christine25 Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:07 PM
    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:38 PM
  • Hello,

    First consideration is, if currently working as a developer what type of applications are in demand and what expectations for applications in the next two years in your location?

    Strive to become a solid developer in present and future technologies using Microsoft online documentation as a go to place for information

    If applicable learn TDD (Test Driven Development) or just learn it. 

    Don't rely on books so much as every author puts their own twist on what they are teaching along with books become outdated very fast today.

    Consider a subscription to Pluralsight for learning various skills but only do this if you are committed to do this very often e.g. every day work through a course, hone skills then move on to another course.

    Technology wise you can't go wrong learning Azure, SQL-Server, .NET Core, HTML5, Jquery, CSS (and for these three take deep dives) and responsive design.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmarked them if they provide no help, this will help others who are looking for solutions to the same or similar problem. Contact via my Twitter (Karen Payne) or Facebook (Karen Payne) via my MSDN profile but will not answer coding question on either.

    NuGet BaseConnectionLibrary for database connections.

    StackOverFlow
    profile for Karen Payne on Stack Exchange

    • Marked as answer by Christine25 Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:07 PM
    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 2:57 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    Looking at the books table of contents it looks like a lot of its content is somewhat dated.

    C# and .NET has evolved enormously since 2005. 15 years is a lifetime in software development. I'm not saying that the book is bad. It's concepts and ideas could still be relevant today. I'm afraid the code samples and specifics about multithreading, parallelism, serialization, remoting, security and web services will probably be less relevant.

    Another difficulty is that .NET has a much wider ecosystem today than it had 15 years ago. What are you most interested in? .NET, .NET Core and the C# language itself? Web-based technologies like ASP.NET? Frontend technologies like WPF, WinForms or Xamarin?

    Since .NET Core, there is a lot of blogs and documentation on the internet. You will probably need more than one book to cover all the topics. There are also a lot of nice, up-to-date courses on platforms like Pluralsight or Udemy.

    Kind regards,

    Johnny Hooyberghs

    Thank you very much Sir.

    Today's difficulty is also that Corporates require us (dev) to know the entire .Net ecosystem !!!

    No matter how much you know C# itself, they require you to also know ASP.Net MVC, .Net Core, WPF and so on !!!

    They do think we are Robot !!



    Christine

    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:01 PM
  • Hello,

    First consideration is, if currently working as a developer what type of applications are in demand and what expectations for applications in the next two years in your location?

    Strive to become a solid developer in present and future technologies using Microsoft online documentation as a go to place for information

    If applicable learn TDD (Test Driven Development) or just learn it. 

    Don't rely on books so much as every author puts their own twist on what they are teaching along with books become outdated very fast today.

    Consider a subscription to Pluralsight for learning various skills but only do this if you are committed to do this very often e.g. every day work through a course, hone skills then move on to another course.

    Technology wise you can't go wrong learning Azure, SQL-Server, .NET Core, HTML5, Jquery, CSS (and for these three take deep dives) and responsive design.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmarked them if they provide no help, this will help others who are looking for solutions to the same or similar problem. Contact via my Twitter (Karen Payne) or Facebook (Karen Payne) via my MSDN profile but will not answer coding question on either.

    NuGet BaseConnectionLibrary for database connections.

    StackOverFlow
    profile for Karen Payne on Stack Exchange

    Thanks Karen.

    Indeed, in my workplace, we do web app in ASP.Net MVC (most) and ASP.Net Core (few); backend in C#.

    So, How Can I download updated offline official MSDN documentation for ASP.Net MVC and ASP.Net Core please?  Also if there's a PDF it would be fine.

    Can you provide me with a link to the offline MSDN doc please?

    So you said about If applicable learn TDD (Test Driven Development) or just learn it.

    Is it worth to learn it? can you please provide me some reason or professional value / experience to learn it; Aslo some drawbacks if I don't learn it??



    Christine

    • Marked as answer by Christine25 Tuesday, October 15, 2019 12:07 PM
    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:11 PM
  • https://www.dofactory.com/net/design-patterns

    You may want to look into Dofactory.

    Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:38 PM
  • Hi Christine25, 

    Thank you for posting here.

    You can read Microsoft's online documentation  , blogs ( like .NET Blog ) , and other documentations at any time to get the useful information you need.

    If you have any problems in .NET, You can search online for answers or ask questions in the appropriate forum.

    Besides, For more information about TDD, you can refer to the following references.

    What is the future of test-driven development?

    Is test driven development the only future of software testing?

    Hope them can help you.

    Best Regards,

    Xingyu Zhao


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, October 9, 2019 7:37 AM
    Moderator
  • Also, Need a clarification on below please.

    In my company, we're only working on ASP.Net MVC, and C# as backend. but we don't do c# WinForms (Desktop App).

    If I want to learn and improve my skills : Can I directly jump on ASP.Net MVC books or I must start reading C# books first.

    Envethough asp.net mvc use c# in backend... but is it worth to read c# only books?

    Can you please tell me?


    Christine



    • Edited by Christine25 Monday, October 14, 2019 6:22 PM
    Monday, October 14, 2019 6:21 PM
  • Anyone can write some, but can you arcutect using design patterns, which a link was given to you.  You need to understand full stack development, if you're in the Web world. 

    You talk about MVC, but do you really understand how to use the UI design pattern effectively? Do you know how to use ASP.NET Core,  because that's where things are headed?


    • Edited by DA924x Monday, October 14, 2019 6:53 PM
    Monday, October 14, 2019 6:52 PM
  • Thanks DA924x.

    I bookmarked the site and going to start reading it today.


    Christine

    Tuesday, October 15, 2019 6:28 AM
  • Hi Christine25,

    Is your problem solved? If so, please click "Mark as answer" to the appropriate answer, so that it will help other members to find the solution quickly if they face a similar issue.

    Besides, if you have more questions about ASP.NET, I suggest post your question in ASP.NET forums for better help.

    Best Regards,

    Xingyu Zhao


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, October 15, 2019 8:58 AM
    Moderator