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Where does the .NET framework put programs? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I wrote a small application in VB Express and installed it on my laptop which runs Windows ME. After installing the .NET framework the application loaded and ran ok. I'm reconciled to the fact that the .NET framework will have to be installed on all my client's computers (even though it took 20 minutes). But the code isn't located in the "Programs" folder. Is this normal? Is there any way to have the installer put them there?

    I want to distribute my application from one CD to run under Windows 98, ME, 2000 and XP. Will this be a problem?

    Sunday, February 4, 2007 9:45 PM

Answers

  •  

    OK, lets picture it like this. At first what I'm saying may sound a little crazy.  When I do help, I write an entire Web. When that's done I compile the Web and I get a .chm which is the compiled web.

    Then I do this:

    Public Sub DisplayHelp(ByVal parent As System.Windows.Forms.Control, _

                                ByVal topic As Integer)

            'Help Interface - Called by MnuHelpHelp_Click

            ' The file to display is chosen by the value of the topic parameter.

     

            Dim filespec As String = "KnowledgeNavigator.chm"

            Windows.Forms.Help.ShowHelp(parent, filespec)

        End Sub

     I use FAR to make help.

    Wednesday, February 7, 2007 11:15 PM

All replies

  •  

    Publication puts programs In an unpronounceable directory in DocumentsAndSetttings

     Directory of C:\Documents and Settings\Renee\Local Settings\Apps\2.0\Z6J2J9G8.X
    KZ\ELTCR4ZX.DE0\foo...tion_81ae23bed3a7b18a_0001.0000_6ebd654ec7c05cb5

    02/04/2007  08:35 PM            28,672 Foo.exe
                   1 File(s)         28,672 bytes

    Monday, February 5, 2007 1:40 AM
  • Since you mention 'client' as in a paying customer (I would presume) I would recommend using an external installation application - ClickOnce is one of the ugliest things I've ever seen (my opinion - others may think it's finer than frog hair). There are valid reasons for the way ClickOnce works - and it does a fine job in what it does - but it isn't professional, like most 'easy-to-use' systems. I would recommend something like Wise, Installshield, NSIS (and others) to perform an install. Or upgrade to VS Pro or higher to have access to the MS installer (I'll plead no comment on that ).

    And yes, the .NET 2.0 Framework will need to be installed on all systems.

    Monday, February 5, 2007 12:49 PM
  •  

    And the ability to do Setup projects is one of the BESSINGS, BLESSING, BLESSINGS of VS2005.

    Monday, February 5, 2007 1:04 PM
  • May be. But, I'm sure having problems using it.
    I located the application on my Win Me laptop in c:\Windows\Apps. Many of the folders and files were strangely altered. But, it was recognizable.
    I tried another experiment in which I downloaded a sample program called HelpSample. It consists of only a form, a menu bar, and some examples of Help functions.. It ran fine on my development system. I then "published" to a separate folder without modifying anything. This was put onto a CD and loaded onto my laptop. The Help>Contents button (of the HelpSample application) would not work. It appears that the htmlhelp.chm file was missing. Any thoughts?
    Monday, February 5, 2007 6:27 PM
  • Renee - i hope - is referring to setup Projects (are a blessing), not OneClick publication (a curse - YYMV).

    With the method of one-click publication, you have very little control (none) how your project is installed on the client machine. You have to differentiate between 'publishing' (Creating an install), and actually 'installing'. The files for deployment will have the extension 'deploy'. You shuld be able to copy the whole folder, as you have done, to a CD and use that as the install medium (there's a setup file you can execute), which is what I presume you have done.

    When you install the aplication, it puts things in a 'funky' (different, shall we say) location. The oneclick method was designed to isolate applications from one anothe: it's possible that the application is trying access the windows folder, but is not allowed to (I'm not sure, but whenever I've used OneClick, it does some strange things so I gave up using it - it was extremely difficult to troubleshoot installs).

    What happens if you perform an XCOPY install? (i.e. copy all the files to the folder of your choice).

     

    Monday, February 5, 2007 6:44 PM
  • I tried your suggestion and copied all the files from my development folder (as they exist before using "Publish") to a CD and copied them into a folder under "My Documents" in my laptop. It runs fine and the Help>Contents button works as intended. So, Win ME is capable of running it. Something is being missed in the Publish function.
    I've got to say that my experience with Visual Basic over the last 2 weeks has been extremely frustrating. I did quite a bit of programming (Basic, Fortran and 8080 assembler) in the pre-Internet era - 70's and 80's. I even created a real-time, event-driven operating system for an 8080 process controller. Furthermore, although I'm 68, I haven't slowed down much - mastered partial differential equations and calculus of variations  in recent years and am now learning tensor analysis. Now, I'm trying to package the results of some recent research into something like a CAD package. It seemed simple. My main tool is an FEA (finite element analysis) package that is script driven. I figured it should be easy to put together a graphic interface that took in the application parameters and built an ascii text file to set up the FEA. The FEA package produces it's own graphic output. So, I don't even have to worry about that. But, I've just been stunned at the difficulty of doing this. One of the biggest obstacles is the technical language. To call it jargon is an understatement. I have desperately combed bookstores and web sites for tutorials in plain english that would give me an overview. After a few pages of pep talk extolling the virtues of whatever product is featured, every publication seems to jump right into the middle of things using incomprehensible terminology or else they want to start you on an 800 page step-by-step journey through a series of applications that go far beyond anything I will use.
    Monday, February 5, 2007 8:29 PM
  •  

     

    Hi Jerry Brown!!! Were you ever the Governor of California?

    "After a few pages of pep talk extolling the virtues of whatever product is featured, every publication seems to jump right into the middle of things using incomprehensible terminology or else they want to start you on an 800 page step-by-step journey through a series of applications that go far beyond anything I will use."

    Or they never find step two. Has any here really ever seen anything on "Remoting"?

    Monday, February 5, 2007 9:50 PM
  • Sounds like all you need to install your application is a batch file :) Honestly, all the publication rubbish is just that. It only really works for simple applications, so why is it better than XCOPY? I may be a bit harsh, but someone really lost their marbles with that one.

    Anyhooo, I'd again recommend a third party install program: I use NSIS (it's free, but an up-hill learning curve - but if you are familiar with 'scripting' then the effort may be worth it).

    Monday, February 5, 2007 10:05 PM
  • Never a Governor and only saw Linda on TV. But for a time, I did find it easier to get hotel reservations in California.
    Monday, February 5, 2007 10:20 PM
  •  

     

    Jerry,

    SJ, if I ever hear the word scripting again, i'll scream. I think newbies who are misusing these words should be taught what source code is and that "code" is singular.

    I also think that Jerry would do well to get a paid for version of VS2005 that makes Setup projects instead of One-Click. It's really funny. A year ago "One-Click" was a really hot word. In the period of a year, it's fallen off the edge of the mother-earth.

    Monday, February 5, 2007 10:36 PM
  • Thanks for the advice. I'm seriously considering your suggestion and even taking it a little further. I started with Visual Basic Express. When I began to encounter the publishing problem I downloaded the 90 day trial version of Studio thinking that might give me access to more learning tools. In between the two I looked at Liberty Basic and downloaded the INNO install compiler. It appears to me that I have two choices - both of which involve learning a lot more. I can stay with Visual Basic with all the slick tools or go with simpler third party products. I assumed that staying with VS would make it less likely that I could make a mistake and  mess up my client's computer. The downside is that I have to wade through a ton of stuff which is useless to me. With something like Liberty Basic I will have to work with Windows at more of a nuts and bolts level where it seems that mistakes will be more likely. The biggest issue, though, is which route will be quicker.
    Monday, February 5, 2007 10:49 PM
  • I've downloaded the 90 day trial version of VS2005 Professional. I haven't seen any reference to Setup Projects. What do I look for?
    Monday, February 5, 2007 10:53 PM
  •  

    YaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaY!!!!!!!!

    In the Solution Explorer, Select the Solution ... then on the other side of the screen File | New Project

    One of the Options under "Other Project Types" will be Set Up and Deployment.  Select that.

    It took me a while to learn the FILE SYSTEM EDITOR which controls where targeted files go. Do pay special attention to the the FSE.

    Ya, know.... I'm never going to let you off the hook for that name. I really liked him. He was my kind of governor.

    Tuesday, February 6, 2007 1:58 AM
  • I may seem pretty dense. But, bear with me. When you say select the solution do you mean that I should start by opening the application's solution file? If so, I don't understand how to do File|New Project without  without  losing what I opened up. You must be referring to some use of the Solution Explorer that I don't understand.
    I tried to make a setup file by using File|New Project|Setup and Deployment and then using File|Add Existing Project|HelpSample.vbproj to add  the files from my project folder. Is that ok? Are all the files needed?
    Also, where can I get some insight into what files go where?
    Tuesday, February 6, 2007 4:32 AM
  •  

    Open your existing Solution as you would normally. Solutions are designed to hold multiple projects.

    Make sure the solution at the top of the project is selected and not a project. Then follow the directions I gave. A setup project can then be created as part of the solution.

    I've been working on the same project for a about a year and a half now that's the last time I've done this. The setup project will know most of the files that need to be included. You have to add extras using the FSE.

     

    Tuesday, February 6, 2007 6:16 AM
  • Ok. I've got the HelpSample application working on my laptop. By the way, in your instructions on adding a setup project: You said to use File|New Project and should have said File|Add|New Project. Took me a few hours before I noticed the Add item. No mind. It got me going in the right direction.
    Now, I'm trying to get something similar working in my little application. I want File|Contents to simply bring up an HTML document that I prepared in MS Word. It's got a few graphics so in addition to the .htm document there is also a folder for the images. I can get it to work on my development system if I use the full path to the htm file as the HelpNamespace definition in the HelpProvider1 properties. But, it never works on my laptop. If I use just the file name without the directory path for HelpNamespace I get part way there - a blank browser page on my laptop. I followed the HelpSample for the Contents method. Here is what is in form1.vb.

     Private Sub ContentsToolStripMenuItem_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As  System.EventArgs) Handles ContentsToolStripMenuItem.Click
            ' Show the contents of the help file.
            Help.ShowHelp(Me, HelpProvider1.HelpNamespace)
        End Sub

    What am I doing wrong?
    Wednesday, February 7, 2007 8:02 PM
  •  

    I don't know Jerry, that's not the way I do help.

    Wednesday, February 7, 2007 8:40 PM
  • How do you do it?
    Wednesday, February 7, 2007 10:25 PM
  •  

    OK, lets picture it like this. At first what I'm saying may sound a little crazy.  When I do help, I write an entire Web. When that's done I compile the Web and I get a .chm which is the compiled web.

    Then I do this:

    Public Sub DisplayHelp(ByVal parent As System.Windows.Forms.Control, _

                                ByVal topic As Integer)

            'Help Interface - Called by MnuHelpHelp_Click

            ' The file to display is chosen by the value of the topic parameter.

     

            Dim filespec As String = "KnowledgeNavigator.chm"

            Windows.Forms.Help.ShowHelp(parent, filespec)

        End Sub

     I use FAR to make help.

    Wednesday, February 7, 2007 11:15 PM