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How can I connect MVC to sql server and use it like c# in add, edit, delete and select RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1339028051 posted

    I am a newbie in sql, asp.net and mvc.

    can I use sqlconnection, sqlcommand, sqladaptor and etc.?

    can anyone help me?

    thank you in advance. ;)

    Sunday, March 15, 2015 9:41 PM

Answers

  • User-166373564 posted

    HI,

    Sir, I'm not familiar in classes. The true is, I'm not using classes in c# for my entire life. :(

    These are full of MVC tutorials, it will be good start, http://www.asp.net/mvc happy coding  : )

    Best regards,

    Angie  

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, March 17, 2015 10:46 PM
  • User281315223 posted

    If you aren't terribly familiar with ASP.NET / C# or if it's simply been a while, I would recommend reading through my recent blog post on the best approaches to learn ASP.NET here. You might want to check out this similar discussion that I answered for another user earlier this year.

    Recommended Resources

    You are basically at one of the best places on the web to learn about ASP.NET and all of it's related technologies. I would highly recommend checking out the available resources in the Learn or Get Started areas of it

    As with most things, there really isn't any best way to learn ASP.NET and C#, as learning in general varies from person to person. I would recommend checking out the following resources, many of which refer to tutorials, walkthroughs, book recommendations, blog posts and much more to help you learn ASP.NET : 

    Regarding Learning MVC

    The easiest way to learn a new technology, such as MVC, would be to actually get your hands dirty and start building some small applications in it and working through some progressively advancing tutorials. Since you already have a development background, many of the concepts should be fairly easy to pick up and you might find that you enjoy using it more than you did your previous technology choices.

    The Getting Started MVC area on this site is a great place to start as well if you want to start learning MVC outside of a book environment. It will cover just about everything that you would need to build complete applications and it is written by experts that apply best practices to help you build good habits for future applications. One of the most well regarded and complete MVC-based tutorials would be the ASP.NET MVC Music Store tutorial, which you can find under the MVC section of this site. However, any of the tutorials on this site should be great stepping stones to get you building your own complete MVC applications in no time.

    You can find a few other resources listing off countless other MVC-based tutorials below: 

    I would definitely recommend the MVC Music Store Tutorial as well as the other ones available on this site (ASP.NET) and if you are still looking for more information after that, check out some of the other links I provided. If you are still looking for some additional tutorials or other MVC based projects, you might want to dig around on open-source sites like github and Codeplex and search for a bit more complex sites and projects.

    Recommended Books and Similar Resources (if you are a fan of book-based learning)

    There are far too many discussions on this topic for me to aptly summarize all of them as there is never any "best" book. I'll refer you to the following discussions on Stack Overflow on this very topic : 

    Additional Resources (Generic Learning Sites and more)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 18, 2015 8:27 AM

All replies

  • User281315223 posted

    You can absolutely use pure ADO.NET (e.g. SqlConnection, SqlCommand, etc.) within MVC to perform SQL queries as seen in the example below :

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult CreateWidget(CreateWidgetModel model)
    {
          // You just posted a new Widget object to create, check if it is valid
          if(ModelState.IsValid)
          {
                // It is, so now we will save it in the database
                using(var sqlConnection = new SqlConnection("Your Connection String"))
                {
                      // Build your query (an example insert)
                      var query = "INSERT INTO YourTable (@WidgetId,@WidgetName,@WidgetDescription)";
    
                      // Build a command to execute this
                      using(var sqlCommand = new SqlCommand(query,sqlConnection))
                      {
                             // Open your connection
                             sqlConnection.Open();
    
                             // Add your parameters
                             sqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@WidgetId",model.WidgetId);
                             sqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@WidgetName",model.WidgetName);
                             sqlCommand.Parameters.AddWithValue("@WidgetDescription",model.WidgetDescription);
    
                             // Execute your query
                             sqlCommand.ExecuteNonQuery();
                      }
                }
          }
    }

    This would take values from your existing View that were assumingly mapped to a model. When this model was posted to the Controller Action above, a SQL connection would be opened and you could build your query, add your parameters and execute it as seen above.

    Sunday, March 15, 2015 10:54 PM
  • User-1339028051 posted

    Sir, where will I put that code?

    in classes?

    Monday, March 16, 2015 11:28 PM
  • User281315223 posted

    Sir, where will I put that code?

    in classes?

    Since you are using MVC, you could put these either within external classes or simply add the logic within your Controller Actions for each of the operations you need to perform. The example above demonstrates if you were to submit a Create Form and use the values that were posted to create a new object within your database. The same basic logic would apply for editing records, deleting records and selecting records.

    Tuesday, March 17, 2015 8:19 AM
  • User-1339028051 posted

    Sir, I'm not familiar in classes. The true is, I'm not using classes in c# for my entire life. :(

    Tuesday, March 17, 2015 9:46 PM
  • User-166373564 posted

    HI,

    Sir, I'm not familiar in classes. The true is, I'm not using classes in c# for my entire life. :(

    These are full of MVC tutorials, it will be good start, http://www.asp.net/mvc happy coding  : )

    Best regards,

    Angie  

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Tuesday, March 17, 2015 10:46 PM
  • User-1339028051 posted

    @Angie,

    thank you. From now on, I will embrace classed with my eyes are closed.

    :)

    God Bless you Angie and Reon.

    Tuesday, March 17, 2015 11:06 PM
  • User281315223 posted

    If you aren't terribly familiar with ASP.NET / C# or if it's simply been a while, I would recommend reading through my recent blog post on the best approaches to learn ASP.NET here. You might want to check out this similar discussion that I answered for another user earlier this year.

    Recommended Resources

    You are basically at one of the best places on the web to learn about ASP.NET and all of it's related technologies. I would highly recommend checking out the available resources in the Learn or Get Started areas of it

    As with most things, there really isn't any best way to learn ASP.NET and C#, as learning in general varies from person to person. I would recommend checking out the following resources, many of which refer to tutorials, walkthroughs, book recommendations, blog posts and much more to help you learn ASP.NET : 

    Regarding Learning MVC

    The easiest way to learn a new technology, such as MVC, would be to actually get your hands dirty and start building some small applications in it and working through some progressively advancing tutorials. Since you already have a development background, many of the concepts should be fairly easy to pick up and you might find that you enjoy using it more than you did your previous technology choices.

    The Getting Started MVC area on this site is a great place to start as well if you want to start learning MVC outside of a book environment. It will cover just about everything that you would need to build complete applications and it is written by experts that apply best practices to help you build good habits for future applications. One of the most well regarded and complete MVC-based tutorials would be the ASP.NET MVC Music Store tutorial, which you can find under the MVC section of this site. However, any of the tutorials on this site should be great stepping stones to get you building your own complete MVC applications in no time.

    You can find a few other resources listing off countless other MVC-based tutorials below: 

    I would definitely recommend the MVC Music Store Tutorial as well as the other ones available on this site (ASP.NET) and if you are still looking for more information after that, check out some of the other links I provided. If you are still looking for some additional tutorials or other MVC based projects, you might want to dig around on open-source sites like github and Codeplex and search for a bit more complex sites and projects.

    Recommended Books and Similar Resources (if you are a fan of book-based learning)

    There are far too many discussions on this topic for me to aptly summarize all of them as there is never any "best" book. I'll refer you to the following discussions on Stack Overflow on this very topic : 

    Additional Resources (Generic Learning Sites and more)

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, March 18, 2015 8:27 AM