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Kinect USB Exception: USB 3.0 detected with unknown bandwidth RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • Hi, 

    I am a newer on the development of Kinect for Windows. I installed Windows 8.1 on my MacBook Pro (with 2 USB 3.0 ports). When I connected the Kinect to laptop, there is an error for USE 3.0, said "Supported USE 3.0 detected with unknown bandwidth", but all samples are working well. I also follow the tutorial from the "Programming Kinect for windows v2" video, It cannot activate the sensor and show images on the screen. Why is there the problem? How could I solve it on my laptop? 

    Many thanks for help,

    Yanchao

    Tuesday, October 28, 2014 9:22 AM

All replies

  • If everything works then you can ignore the message. MacBook Pros have shared USB3 ports so be careful that you are not doing much anything else over USB3 at the same time. That said, we have use Windows To Go USB3 boot drives and Kinect for Windows v2 at the same time without issues.

    Have you followed the pattern demonstrated in the sample code exactly. Typically people forget to Open the sensor or are not releasing/disposing frames (->Release()/using(){}) patterns demonstrated in the samples.


    Carmine Sirignano - MSFT

    Tuesday, October 28, 2014 6:38 PM
  • Dear Sirignano,

    Many thanks for your reply. I am following the sample code, but there is another problem about adding the reference "Microsoft.Kinect". That said "The project targets '.NETCore' while the file reference targets '.NETFramework'. This is not a supported scenario.". How could I fix it on Visual Studio 2013? 

    Thanks for your help again,

    Yanchao 

    Wednesday, October 29, 2014 10:16 AM
  • If you are writing a store application then you should be using the add reference to the target extension, see link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn799310.aspx. (WindowsPreview.Kinect)

    If you are using WPF/WinForm, then use the reference to the registered .Net Microsoft.Kinect assembly. You should not be referencing a specific .dll directly.


    Carmine Sirignano - MSFT

    Wednesday, October 29, 2014 4:52 PM