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Becoming Architect roadmap RRS feed

  • Question

  • hi friends

    my english is not good , i'm sorry , so I wrote short Smile

    I would  like to become a Software Architect and then solution architect and now i have becoming developer in front of my face 

    so i made a roadmap myself but i dont know is it a good approach or not , like any person I need help (advice) so that which technology , methodology and science I should learn and when (order)

     hence your advice can help me and change my future career or may be life Smile

    before anything I should say thanks and appreciate from your opinion

     

    this is my map , and I stand between phase 3 and 4 - learning asp.net - , in the circle ar somethings that i dont know how to put it to map but the major problem is map itself - is it true ? your advise and opinin ?

    roadmap : http://www.tahmasebi.org/Developer22.jpg


     

    Thursday, August 14, 2008 10:43 AM

Answers

  • Nowadays there is so much content and reading material that there might just not be enough time to read everything from a to z. If you find some special interest area, it would be worthwhile to read more thoroughly that. And general ideas are more worthy than hundred similar approaches each.

    You should get familiar with all the techniques and methods you are going to use. While you can skip some stuff, you have to understand that there is no short cuts to mastery. If you want to master something, you need to actually master it and prove it to yourself.

    Young students might not always think that some issues are real and important until they learn from mistakes. Its good to avoid mistakes by practicing and learning beforehand. Of course its difficult to know what you should learn if you are going to not learn something else. Anyway, practicing with some concrete examples is very precious, because you get real experience.

    BizTalk Server has some advanced features. But if you were business people you would be interested in BizTalk Server even if you didn't know how to create .Net-applications. Though business people would leave operating the server for more technical oriented people and analysts and such.
    Friday, August 15, 2008 5:30 PM
  • I agree with silvercode that there is so much material you should specialise.  I take more interest in integration technologies because that is where i have found the biggest advantage for the projects in the organisations I work in. 

     

    Although, it is generally easy to learn a technical skill I find communication skills are behavioural and therefore take longer to learn or change.  Continually finding ways to improve and learn these skills is what works best for me. 

     

    Therefore, I advise learning and practising them alongside your technical skills.  I find Giving presentations on technical matters a great way to solidaify your knowledge.  In other words, I find these skills complementary.

     

    I would argue that communication skills are more important for an architect than other technical people because we should be able to communicate ideas to different stakeholders at different levels.  Most developers only need to communicate thier ideas with other programmers or technical staff or managers.  Unfortunately, I find most developers that want to become architects concentrate on the technical rather than the soft skills.

     

    On the subject of biztalk;

    This should be treated as any other technology so I'm not sure why you have singled this out.  You should know the problem it solves and when it is useful.  Have a play around with it but don't get too involved.  You will then know when it may help your organisation and be able to investigate its use more (or steer a developer in the right direction).

     

    Saturday, August 16, 2008 11:13 AM

All replies

  • Nice map.

    I think that solution architect is not above software architect, because solution architect doesn't need that deep understanding of software architecting than software architect. The field of solution architect is broader covering some software architecting and some system architecting while concentrating on creating solutions. Then again there are software architects and system architects, and they should be paid as much, because they both do architecting - the other for software and the other for systems that contain software.
    Thursday, August 14, 2008 4:38 PM
  • I agree it is a nice map.  It seems to have all the salient technologies there.

     

    Though, there seems to be a lack of soft skills though. The role of architect is not simply a technical one.  You will have to communicate your ideas and see them through to implementation.

     

    Throughout your architect career you will need to lead, manage, persuade and negotiate with both technical and non-technical colleagues and stakeholders.  I think your list of skills would be more complete if it included written and verbal communication, presentation, and negotiaton skills.

     

    You may also need the ability to tell a joke or two if your projects don't go smoothly :-)

    Friday, August 15, 2008 11:34 AM
  •  

    I'd really appreciate your posts and thoughts

    ----------------------------------------------------------------

     

    ->SilverCode : after reading some text* in base of your statement I'v got that I was in a wrong way
    to becoming solution architect , the truth goal is software(ism).

  • : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_architect


    ->G Moore : I've thought about communication skills , but I could not arrange the order
    of Communication and technic - that is Which one of them I should acquire first ,
    or should learn parallel ? - because I'am student in Bsc of Software Engineering and I must manage
    my free time , I'm really glad if you clear it .

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    a General question :
     a software architect -with a truth that he/she must be up-to-dated and growly speed of publication and the most one -> technology - should read completely a reference book from content page to index page and seriously delve into details ?!

    OR

    It's enough to take a book and skimming it and get a general knowledge , and leave unwanted topics ?
    because I think "Learning" is a important science today and maybe tomorrow see it in our desk
    namely "Meta Learning" Smile

    [my solution : read carefully infrastructure technologies -like ASP.NET- and skim superstructure that can skip it until be demanded for details]


    and final technical question :
    when I should bring Biztalk to the game ?

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     

    I hope pardon me for too long questions and my English Smile


    thank you very much

     

Friday, August 15, 2008 4:43 PM
  • Nowadays there is so much content and reading material that there might just not be enough time to read everything from a to z. If you find some special interest area, it would be worthwhile to read more thoroughly that. And general ideas are more worthy than hundred similar approaches each.

    You should get familiar with all the techniques and methods you are going to use. While you can skip some stuff, you have to understand that there is no short cuts to mastery. If you want to master something, you need to actually master it and prove it to yourself.

    Young students might not always think that some issues are real and important until they learn from mistakes. Its good to avoid mistakes by practicing and learning beforehand. Of course its difficult to know what you should learn if you are going to not learn something else. Anyway, practicing with some concrete examples is very precious, because you get real experience.

    BizTalk Server has some advanced features. But if you were business people you would be interested in BizTalk Server even if you didn't know how to create .Net-applications. Though business people would leave operating the server for more technical oriented people and analysts and such.
    Friday, August 15, 2008 5:30 PM
  • I agree with silvercode that there is so much material you should specialise.  I take more interest in integration technologies because that is where i have found the biggest advantage for the projects in the organisations I work in. 

     

    Although, it is generally easy to learn a technical skill I find communication skills are behavioural and therefore take longer to learn or change.  Continually finding ways to improve and learn these skills is what works best for me. 

     

    Therefore, I advise learning and practising them alongside your technical skills.  I find Giving presentations on technical matters a great way to solidaify your knowledge.  In other words, I find these skills complementary.

     

    I would argue that communication skills are more important for an architect than other technical people because we should be able to communicate ideas to different stakeholders at different levels.  Most developers only need to communicate thier ideas with other programmers or technical staff or managers.  Unfortunately, I find most developers that want to become architects concentrate on the technical rather than the soft skills.

     

    On the subject of biztalk;

    This should be treated as any other technology so I'm not sure why you have singled this out.  You should know the problem it solves and when it is useful.  Have a play around with it but don't get too involved.  You will then know when it may help your organisation and be able to investigate its use more (or steer a developer in the right direction).

     

    Saturday, August 16, 2008 11:13 AM
  •  

    I think these posts is the most invaluable matters I've read till now in this field

    [because these notes exactly address my problems]

     

    so I really advice any person want to become a solid architect read this text carefully and exploit a framework and strategy plan for future life with a less slope ,
    and thank to these man .

     

    ------------------------------


    -> SilverCode : I've got that I should be specialist -base on importance of field-  and generalist occasionally from your advices , and not avoid to know unfamiliar things because its have very advantages that you pointed it out in best way.

     and I think your third paragraph is holy and subtle matter , its really helpful.

     

    -> G Moore : you address the most colorful and important part of a Architect Character , until now I'v gave little value to this subject -I think lots of engineer have not paid any attention to this division in ther career life Unfortunately- bacause I did not like face to face relationship, but now with your advice I'll reshape and refresh my mind and dictate it word by word in my gray matter , and start learning English and improve my native communication skills.

     

    ------------------------------

     

    my people when take goodness tell brilliant words , I don't have ability mapping them to English , sorry

    greatest thanks Smile

     

    Saturday, August 16, 2008 8:54 PM
  • Agha Mehdi,

     

     

    Be prepared for a life long learning plan.  Once you enter this game of  "IT" there is no stopping.  The worst thing about Information Technology is the rate at which your knowledge becomes antiquated.... That means your knowledge has a very short shelf life.  Most of what you learn will not be necessarily usable in a few years.   So you have to spend time learning the new tools and technologies.... That's why the pay is good...   You are perhaps a bit luckier.... as you did not start with DOS 1.0 and GW Basic.  Looking back I realize that much of what we have learned in the past 28 years is NOT necessarily salvageable.  The reason is obvious... Software is so young compared with other technologies and it takes many trials before they get it right.  Looking at VS2008 and compare it with VS 2002 or 2003, you realize that it is significantly richer in terms of classes, controls and its capabilities.  So the question is how long before the next VS comes out?  To stay competitive you have to learn the new version on perhaps a new OS and you may even have to unlearn a few things...  So be prepared for these changes that are inevitable...

     

    What happens if you stop learning?  That would be the end of your career... in IT.... and in a couple of years you would be replaced with younger generation programmers and developers.

     

    So when you plan your future.... think of it not just in terms of roadmap for certification...  think of your goals for the next 10 to 15 years. ( I want to say more...like 20-25 years but it's unpredictable).

     

    I think the hot topics today are Unified Communications....  and  ERP systems like Solomon and GP to more sophisticated like Axapta ( I only mentioned Microsoft's) and Business intelligence or BI.

     

    Regards,

    Bijan G.

    Saturday, August 16, 2008 11:06 PM
  • sepas agha Bijan

     

    Sunday, August 17, 2008 10:12 AM