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  • This is just a suggestion but I think it might help some people. I am new to C and am learning with Visual C# 2008 express and XNA Game Studio 3.1. You have the visual basic upgrade feature already, would it work to do it with those to things as well? making it easier to learn the concept of C#?
    Thursday, January 28, 2010 8:55 AM

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  • I think that moving from Small Basic to another BASIC (Visual Basic .NET) is far more natural for complete beginners not familiar with the C-style family of languages than progressing to C#, as most terms you'll come across in SB will be similar in VB.NET.
    Ofcourse not all hope is lost for C# programmers; here's an automatic translation utility that can translate from VB.NET to C# : http://www.carlosag.net/Tools/CodeTranslator/ . I can't guarentee it'll work perfectly, and you'll still have to add the required libraries and such yourself, but it will get you started with the general C# syntax.

    Hope it helps.
    Friday, January 29, 2010 1:09 PM
  • I would love to see a version of C# along the same vein of Small Basic.  A simple IDE and limited number of keywords that would teach beginners basic principles allowing them to ease into the more complex ideas of a full blown compiler.
    Saturday, January 30, 2010 12:06 AM
  • I would love to see a version of C# along the same vein of Small Basic.  A simple IDE and limited number of keywords that would teach beginners basic principles allowing them to ease into the more complex ideas of a full blown compiler.
    As would I. The problem is to define what kind of subset to use. If a similar approach was taken as Small Basic (no types, variable scope, object oriented programming or complex programming and adding the Small Basic API) you'd end up with pretty much the same language except for the semicolon behind each line. But maybe it is possible to develop an 'intermediate' programming experience based on C#.

    The main complexity of C# lies in the GUI, which is perfect for professional programmers, but more than a little confusing for beginners. As for the language itself, it does contain many advanced concepts, but none of these are actually mandatory in practice, the basic language is pretty simple. And ofcourse there's the big .NET API: a lot simpler than earlier API's, but still pretty advanced.

    So my idea of a 'Small C#' ('C♭'?) would be to take the standard Microsoft C# command line compiler, add a simpler GUI on top of it, and add a port of the Small Basic API to complement it. The most important thing however would be a friendly community like the one Small Basic has grown around itself.
    Saturday, January 30, 2010 7:32 PM
  • I'd give my right mouse click to have VB 6 again, the simplicity, ability to do pretty much anything, experience the 'fun' of programming.  Ever since the Java wave came and created a spawn of Ada/VHDL-like complex committee designed languages the fun was all but removed with all the buried abstract syntax.  At work we called VB 6's programming style "slap & pop" where you'd slap up a full gui literally in seconds to minutes, and pop in the code.  We cranked out so much product it was rediculous, and used it for things that would amaze you.  Ease & functionality, all in one.  Now I spend much of my time looking up examples on how to do most anything in these modern languages...no fun!  You can't waste your brain on syntax when it should be creating and getting the algorithm right and bugs out.

    I think I like the idea of something like C# that is fully capable of anything, at the same time simple to use without the buried syntax.  Really, who needs to say Math.abs(), all that should be part of the core language.  SB is doing the job for entry level, but we also seriously need a language that supports the next level that permits the professional productivity enjoyed in the late 90's.  It's first requirement is to have a 'hello world' program look like this again:

    print "hello world"
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 10:06 PM
  • Well on your last statement. I started to learn lua for a while, it was pretty easy to learn in my own opinion, and "Hello World" was done pretty much like that. Print "Hello World" I don't remember exactly how it was but it was pretty close if not the same. The only thing is, I'm not sure what Lua could be used for?
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 10:40 PM