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How to create an "OAL" or "Tiny Kernel" image? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    I am working on omap4470 platform which runs Windows Embedded Compact 7.

    There is a CTK test i.e. GetIdleTime Test which is failing currently. I am referring below link:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg154936.aspx

    On the above link, it is mentioned that this test should be run on an "OAL" or "Tiny Kernel" image.

    Does anyone have any clue how to create Tiny Kernel image? I am trying to remove Sysgen variables to remove the various drivers.

    Can anyone help on this? Or any other suggestions to create such an image?

    Friday, October 4, 2013 2:01 PM

All replies

  • Create a new OSDesign and select the "Small Footprint Device" design template.

    Bruce Eitman (eMVP)
    Senior Engineer
    Bruce.Eitman AT Eurotech DOT com
    My BLOG http://geekswithblogs.net/bruceeitman

    Eurotech Inc.
    www.Eurotech.com

    • Proposed as answer by Paul G. Tobey Friday, October 4, 2013 5:34 PM
    Friday, October 4, 2013 4:28 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the response Bruce.

    But, We have some client-specific custom build steps. If I follow the procedure you have mentioned I will just get the standard output files (nk.bin etc). But I need some more files which we usually flash on the device.

    I am not aware of the build system in depth so couldn't modify the scripts to generate the desired output files by following your procedure.

    Proceeding with removing Sysgen variables to create tiny kernel image.

    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 7:06 AM
  • I thought that the question related to running CETK tests.  I apologize if I misunderstood.


    Bruce Eitman (eMVP)
    Senior Engineer
    Bruce.Eitman AT Eurotech DOT com
    My BLOG http://geekswithblogs.net/bruceeitman

    Eurotech Inc.
    www.Eurotech.com

    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 9:59 AM
    Moderator
  • I don't have any additional suggestions (other than what Bruce Mentioned), but the CETK documentation suggests that you run a minimal system because it measures the amount of time that the system is idle and will fail if it does not spend enough time in the idle state (based on what it expects.)

    If there are other threads performing background processing on the system those threads can consume processor resources and may result in running when the system is expected to be idle.  This will throw off the reported idle time reported which makes the CETK test think that something is going wrong in the system.

    If those additional files that are generated by the custom build steps results in additional threads being ran on the system they may actually be the culprit of the failure of the CETK tests.

    Brad.

    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 6:05 PM