none
.NET Data Access Architecture Guide from 2003 still good? RRS feed

Answers

  • There is absolutely nothing holding you away from the old and proven way. Pick whatever technology suits you better. Just make sure you avoid SQL injection attacks :-)

    Miha Markic [MVP C#] http://blog.rthand.com
    Friday, April 9, 2010 6:35 AM
  • You can still use SQL statements and stored procedures with EF, but the approach how you work with data on client side is different. With EF it's more entity (object) oriented approach, but with ADO.NET API it's more data-element approach.
    Val Mazur (MVP) http://www.xporttools.net
    Friday, April 9, 2010 10:20 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • With the release of Visual Studio 2010, I would say the data access should shift more toward of using Entity Framework, but if you still need low level access to the data without adding overhead of EF functionality then it's still valid
    Val Mazur (MVP) http://www.xporttools.net
    Thursday, April 8, 2010 10:02 AM
    Moderator
  • So like if I wanted to use SQL Statements and Stored Procedures, etc. I should use the old way?
    rasmasyean
    Friday, April 9, 2010 3:08 AM
  • There is absolutely nothing holding you away from the old and proven way. Pick whatever technology suits you better. Just make sure you avoid SQL injection attacks :-)

    Miha Markic [MVP C#] http://blog.rthand.com
    Friday, April 9, 2010 6:35 AM
  • You can still use SQL statements and stored procedures with EF, but the approach how you work with data on client side is different. With EF it's more entity (object) oriented approach, but with ADO.NET API it's more data-element approach.
    Val Mazur (MVP) http://www.xporttools.net
    Friday, April 9, 2010 10:20 AM
    Moderator