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What is the need for strong naming an assembly RRS feed

Answers

  • Signing an assembly proves the origin of the module and help to check at runtime that nobody has tempered with it. It also allows you to have a greater degree of administrative flexibility by allowing you to grant various permission policies depending on the assembly origin - like disk access, registry access, etc.
    • Proposed as answer by Loukoum Thursday, July 23, 2009 7:26 AM
    • Marked as answer by Zhi-Xin Ye Tuesday, July 28, 2009 1:58 PM
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 5:31 PM

All replies

  • I'd suggest reading up on MSDN .

    Basically, strongly naming an assembly provides assurances to the user's of your assembly about it's version as well as the authenticity of the assembly (basically, that it hasn't been modified after it was published).

    Reed Copsey, Jr. - http://reedcopsey.com
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 5:31 PM
    Moderator
  • Signing an assembly proves the origin of the module and help to check at runtime that nobody has tempered with it. It also allows you to have a greater degree of administrative flexibility by allowing you to grant various permission policies depending on the assembly origin - like disk access, registry access, etc.
    • Proposed as answer by Loukoum Thursday, July 23, 2009 7:26 AM
    • Marked as answer by Zhi-Xin Ye Tuesday, July 28, 2009 1:58 PM
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 5:31 PM
  • Is it about securing an assembly or about identifying multiple versions of an asembly
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 6:11 PM
  • Reed/PBA are right.

    The question is though, will this be used by others, either in-company or outside?

    If there are consumers beside yourself, then case for signing provides what the two previous have stated and do that in an excellent way. But for internal projects which won't be exposed, the need to sign is not necessarily warranted in that situation and not necessarily needed.

    William Wegerson (www.OmegaCoder.Com)
    Tuesday, July 21, 2009 6:13 PM
    Moderator