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computational thinking RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is there a way to get better at problem solving. I was told by multiple people that thats the first and most important part of becoming better at coding.

    can anyoine shed any light, please?

    Monday, March 11, 2013 4:32 AM

Answers

  • When you solve complicated problem, firstly you should understand the problem.  Then write solution as easy as possible with natural language.  And divide the problem to small part and write the detail.

    This description in natural language will become comment of program.  After that repeat writing program a little bit and testing it.


    Nonki Takahashi


    Monday, March 11, 2013 11:05 AM
    Moderator
  • Problem solving must be pretty important. If you browse job ads for programmers a lot of them ask their short listers to sit an exam that involves solving puzzles.

    Also as you work through the Small Basic curriculum you are asked to do an exercise at the end of each chapter. The exercises require you to work out how to tell the computer (write the code) to perform a task, calculate answers and manipulate data amoung other things. The monthly challenges also require problem solving, some of them require quite a lot of problem solving.

    Problem solving has quite a bit to do with memory, both recent and older memories. Once you do something you can remember what works and what doesn't work. If look into it further you can discover why it works and how you worked it out. Then your better equiped to solve/approach a different problem that might be solved faster by using your accumulated knowledge of what does and what doesn't work, why it does or doesn't and how you worked out what does and doesn't, why it does and why it doesn't.

    If the mouse thinks then it will get through the maze quicker and easier the 2nd time.

    Practicing and rethinking solutions to problems will only increase your ability to solve problems. Coding is all about finding a better way to do something and working out how to do something for the first time.

    Some interesting and related links:

    http://www.ncwit.org/sites/default/files/resources/computerscience-in-a-box.pdf

    http://education.sdsc.edu/resources/CompThinking.pdf

    Monday, March 11, 2013 11:20 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi! Microsoft has been championing Computational Thinking in schools, via Jeannette Wing's work. You can see all her great content here:

    https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/user_ed/2016/07/15/microsoft-computational-thinking/

     

    Thanks!


    Ed Price, Azure Development Customer Program Manager (Blog, Small Basic, Wiki Ninjas, Wiki)

    Answer an interesting question? Create a wiki article about it!

    Friday, July 15, 2016 6:27 PM
    Owner
  • With computer, there are two type of problem solving.

    One is just calculating with computer.  The program will be written as how to calculate it.  You know the solution.

    Second is by simulation with computer.  The program will be written as a simulator of a kind of a model.  You should know about the behavior of model.  But the computer simulate the model and solution may be found.

    Anyway I recommend you to write and read many programs, and take notes about your problems and ideas.


    Nonki Takahashi

    Monday, March 11, 2013 12:39 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • When you solve complicated problem, firstly you should understand the problem.  Then write solution as easy as possible with natural language.  And divide the problem to small part and write the detail.

    This description in natural language will become comment of program.  After that repeat writing program a little bit and testing it.


    Nonki Takahashi


    Monday, March 11, 2013 11:05 AM
    Moderator
  • Problem solving must be pretty important. If you browse job ads for programmers a lot of them ask their short listers to sit an exam that involves solving puzzles.

    Also as you work through the Small Basic curriculum you are asked to do an exercise at the end of each chapter. The exercises require you to work out how to tell the computer (write the code) to perform a task, calculate answers and manipulate data amoung other things. The monthly challenges also require problem solving, some of them require quite a lot of problem solving.

    Problem solving has quite a bit to do with memory, both recent and older memories. Once you do something you can remember what works and what doesn't work. If look into it further you can discover why it works and how you worked it out. Then your better equiped to solve/approach a different problem that might be solved faster by using your accumulated knowledge of what does and what doesn't work, why it does or doesn't and how you worked out what does and doesn't, why it does and why it doesn't.

    If the mouse thinks then it will get through the maze quicker and easier the 2nd time.

    Practicing and rethinking solutions to problems will only increase your ability to solve problems. Coding is all about finding a better way to do something and working out how to do something for the first time.

    Some interesting and related links:

    http://www.ncwit.org/sites/default/files/resources/computerscience-in-a-box.pdf

    http://education.sdsc.edu/resources/CompThinking.pdf

    Monday, March 11, 2013 11:20 AM
    Moderator
  • With computer, there are two type of problem solving.

    One is just calculating with computer.  The program will be written as how to calculate it.  You know the solution.

    Second is by simulation with computer.  The program will be written as a simulator of a kind of a model.  You should know about the behavior of model.  But the computer simulate the model and solution may be found.

    Anyway I recommend you to write and read many programs, and take notes about your problems and ideas.


    Nonki Takahashi

    Monday, March 11, 2013 12:39 PM
    Moderator
  • thanks for all your help you guys. Thanks for the links as well.

    Im currently trying to pratice problems in C and C++. By first thinking about the programs and write them out in comments then go back and code.

    Wednesday, March 13, 2013 9:50 PM
  • Hi! Microsoft has been championing Computational Thinking in schools, via Jeannette Wing's work. You can see all her great content here:

    https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/user_ed/2016/07/15/microsoft-computational-thinking/

     

    Thanks!


    Ed Price, Azure Development Customer Program Manager (Blog, Small Basic, Wiki Ninjas, Wiki)

    Answer an interesting question? Create a wiki article about it!

    Friday, July 15, 2016 6:27 PM
    Owner