locked
Differences between WPF/E and Java Applets, ActiveX RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    If anyone has some information on differences between WPF/E and Java Applets,activeX, then please let me know.

    Regards,

    Santosh Kalkeri

    Monday, March 26, 2007 5:16 AM

Answers

  • Well, there are certainly differences. The biggest difference between WPF/E and the other two technologies, is that WPF/E expects the content it renders to be supplied to it in the form of declarative markup (e.g. XAML), and the presentation it renders will be different based on the supplied XAML. You can use Javascript to inteact with the WPF/E object model exposed by the WPF/E control to animate, interact or change the behaviour of the presentation. 

     

    A Java Applet on the other hand is 100% code. Everything shown in the applet will depend on the code compiled into the applet. Sure somebody could write an applet that read a markup langauge and rendered it's presentation based on that markup (e.g. the Batik SVG engine), but in general, a Java applet is all code, and all compiled code for that matter. Applets don't generally allow Javascript programming agains't the applet's object model either (xcept in purpose built systems like Batik). Incidentally with Applets you need the entire Java runtime (~20 mbytes) on your client machine. While not that big a deal, it compares to WPF/E which only requires a small 3-4 mbyte runtime.

     

    ActiveX controls are very similar to Applets in this vain. An ActiveX control is all code, and in general is written to support a specific presentation application. Again, as in the applet case you could write a special Activex control to read a markup and expose a Javascript programming api (e.g,. the Adobe SVG viewer or the WPF/E control itself for the Windows IE build), but that is not the general case. Further, ActiveX controls are a Windows only technology.

     

    So the WPF/E is a very special purpose control, that permits declarative, scriptable presentation layer capabilities. Runtimes exist for Windows IE, Firefox and MAC OSX 10.4.8+. The other technologies are more general purpose.

     

    Hope that helps,

     

    Kevgor

    Tuesday, March 27, 2007 3:46 PM

All replies

  • Well, there are certainly differences. The biggest difference between WPF/E and the other two technologies, is that WPF/E expects the content it renders to be supplied to it in the form of declarative markup (e.g. XAML), and the presentation it renders will be different based on the supplied XAML. You can use Javascript to inteact with the WPF/E object model exposed by the WPF/E control to animate, interact or change the behaviour of the presentation. 

     

    A Java Applet on the other hand is 100% code. Everything shown in the applet will depend on the code compiled into the applet. Sure somebody could write an applet that read a markup langauge and rendered it's presentation based on that markup (e.g. the Batik SVG engine), but in general, a Java applet is all code, and all compiled code for that matter. Applets don't generally allow Javascript programming agains't the applet's object model either (xcept in purpose built systems like Batik). Incidentally with Applets you need the entire Java runtime (~20 mbytes) on your client machine. While not that big a deal, it compares to WPF/E which only requires a small 3-4 mbyte runtime.

     

    ActiveX controls are very similar to Applets in this vain. An ActiveX control is all code, and in general is written to support a specific presentation application. Again, as in the applet case you could write a special Activex control to read a markup and expose a Javascript programming api (e.g,. the Adobe SVG viewer or the WPF/E control itself for the Windows IE build), but that is not the general case. Further, ActiveX controls are a Windows only technology.

     

    So the WPF/E is a very special purpose control, that permits declarative, scriptable presentation layer capabilities. Runtimes exist for Windows IE, Firefox and MAC OSX 10.4.8+. The other technologies are more general purpose.

     

    Hope that helps,

     

    Kevgor

    Tuesday, March 27, 2007 3:46 PM
  •  

    Thanks Kevin !! Your reply helped me a lot to know the 'Differences between WPF/E and Java Applets, ActiveX'

     

    Santosh Kalkeri

    Friday, March 30, 2007 9:09 AM