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Barcode and barcode scanner in access 2013 RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello everybody,
    I'm about to start my small business in order to survive in this world.  I need tips about :
    1- how to create barcodes  ?
    2- How to connect barcode scanner to Microsoft access (2013)?
    3- How to make barcode scanner read the codes ?
    4- What is the best barcode scanner that I can deal with ?

    Please feed me some knowledge from your experience in steps. I'm very new with using barcode. 
    Many thanks in advance


    • Edited by AlefAelol Wednesday, September 16, 2015 7:39 PM
    Wednesday, September 16, 2015 7:38 PM

Answers

  • Hello AlefAelol:

    Without knowing how your application works, I'm not sure what you mean when you say "does each barcode or code refers to one item in  my database?".  If your barcode refers to the primary key in one of your tables, then yes, a barcode would refer to one table record in your database.  But barcodes are used for many purposes.  At one of my past clients, they used barcodes on orders, so that when the order was entered, they didn't have to key in the order number... they just scanned it.

    It is also used in most grocery markets, where the barcode is scanned at the register.  In that case, you can see it is not unique, and is just part of a sales record in which the same product is sold multiple times each day.

    Think of a barcode as just a "shortcut" to prevent the need to key in data... really nothing more or less.  It identifies a physical object, and that code is used to set pricing, set inventory levels, etc.


    Rich Locus, Logicwurks, LLC

    http://www.logicwurks.com

    • Marked as answer by AlefAelol Thursday, September 17, 2015 10:45 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2015 4:53 AM

All replies

  • Hello!

    Ah yes... Bar codes.  I have had to deal with them on several occasions.  First, to create a barcode from Access you only need to download barcode fonts.  The most common (and easiest) is 3 of 9 bar codes.  Let's say you want to have your barcode print "Hello".  You would code it with a leading and trailing asterisk:  *Hello* and that would create a proper barcode.  You could use a form's textbox as the source of printing a barcode.

    The other bar codes usually require special software add-ins, such as Code 128, which are difficult to generate because of the algorithms they use.  But 128 bar codes are more versatile.

    Once you create the bar codes, you can buy a scanner which delivers the characters you scan as an ASCII stream.  The barcode scanners emulate a keyboard, so it's just like someone is typing in the proper characters.  For my applications, I created a form with a textbox as the target for the keyboard emulation and made sure the fonts in the textbox were barcode specific.

    It has been a while since I used barcode scanners, so look at the "best of breed" studies on scanners.  For Access, they must emulate a keyboard.

    Hope those little snippets help.


    Rich Locus, Logicwurks, LLC

    http://www.logicwurks.com

    Wednesday, September 16, 2015 7:59 PM
  • Hello!

    Ah yes... Bar codes.  I have had to deal with them on several occasions.  First, to create a barcode from Access you only need to download barcode fonts.  The most common (and easiest) is 3 of 9 bar codes.  Let's say you want to have your barcode print "Hello".  You would code it with a leading and trailing asterisk:  *Hello* and that would create a proper barcode.  You could use a form's textbox as the source of printing a barcode.

    The other bar codes usually require special software add-ins, such as Code 128, which are difficult to generate because of the algorithms they use.  But 128 bar codes are more versatile.

    Once you create the bar codes, you can buy a scanner which delivers the characters you scan as an ASCII stream.  The barcode scanners emulate a keyboard, so it's just like someone is typing in the proper characters.  For my applications, I created a form with a textbox as the target for the keyboard emulation and made sure the fonts in the textbox were barcode specific.

    It has been a while since I used barcode scanners, so look at the "best of breed" studies on scanners.  For Access, they must emulate a keyboard.

    Hope those little snippets help.


    Rich Locus, Logicwurks, LLC

    http://www.logicwurks.com

    Thank you for the replay Rich Locus.
    Regarding the code that i will generate, does each barcode or code refers to one item in  my database ?
    Wednesday, September 16, 2015 8:13 PM
  • As RL pointed out; from the Access point of view - inbound - a bar code scanner is no different than a keyboard.

    The translation of the bar being scanned to "123" in the text field is done by your barcode software - and so that much actually isn't an Access question but a topic for the barcode vendors.

    Big industries have agreed codes - like grocery stores - and that is all packaged in software; but I presume you will be using something where you define... so you get a set of 1000 codes and scanned they display 0 - 999. You'll want a usb connected scanner and software package that keeps things simple they have their own jargon....what you want would work as well with excel or word...where ever the cursor is located - do the scan - and "123" is entered just like the keyboard.....

    You then have, in the either the barcode software or in Access, is a translation table where entirely up to you can have 0 = widgets, 1 = something, 2 = donuts, etc   So what the code means to you as the database designer is entirely up to you.  This can get tricky when things are in packs but also individual.... but you see the little number for when the scanner can't read the bars - - you enter that number and up comes 'widgets'....depending on your application you might want the number itself in the field - and then translate that to widgets using Access showing in another field...so there is some issues of design/method that are up to you.

    Outbound: Generating the bar codes with the font as RL pointed out is an issue - so keep an eye on that as it can get messy involving printer types too which is way off topic here.... some use to sell sheets of pre printed codes you peel off.....  been awhile since I've had to deal with it....


    Wednesday, September 16, 2015 10:13 PM
  • Hello AlefAelol:

    Without knowing how your application works, I'm not sure what you mean when you say "does each barcode or code refers to one item in  my database?".  If your barcode refers to the primary key in one of your tables, then yes, a barcode would refer to one table record in your database.  But barcodes are used for many purposes.  At one of my past clients, they used barcodes on orders, so that when the order was entered, they didn't have to key in the order number... they just scanned it.

    It is also used in most grocery markets, where the barcode is scanned at the register.  In that case, you can see it is not unique, and is just part of a sales record in which the same product is sold multiple times each day.

    Think of a barcode as just a "shortcut" to prevent the need to key in data... really nothing more or less.  It identifies a physical object, and that code is used to set pricing, set inventory levels, etc.


    Rich Locus, Logicwurks, LLC

    http://www.logicwurks.com

    • Marked as answer by AlefAelol Thursday, September 17, 2015 10:45 AM
    Thursday, September 17, 2015 4:53 AM