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Best place to start for game creation... RRS feed

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  • Those tutorials are a good start.  Get your hands on a good language reference book.  I recommend the ones published by Microsoft.  Even though the current version of Visual Studio is 2010, the older books for 2005 and 2008 may be a better place to start.  The newer books tend to focus on the newer features, which only confuse newcomers.

    And practice, practice, practice.  You may want to start reading questions that others have.  Try to understand them, or even solve them yourself.

    Programming Microsoft Visual C# 2008: The Language

    Rudy   =8^D 


    Mark the best replies as answers. "Fooling computers since 1971."

    http://thesharpercoder.blogspot.com/


    • Marked as answer by Jackie-Sun Monday, August 29, 2011 6:32 AM
    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12:31 AM
  • You have ZERO programming experience?  You're going to need to learn to crawl before you can walk...or run...or do gymnastics.

    I found Rudy's advice to be exactly what I would give.  It's a long road ahead.

    And yet there are always people on this forum that ask for books that guide them through the process.  I think that I always had a pretty good idea of what I was capable of, and would choose projects that pushed my limits.  No book ever guided me.  You just need to choose a good string of projects that help you grow and learn.

    "Hello World" is a good place to start!

    I think that random number generators are useful to be introduced to early on.  Guessing games and text-based interfaces are good for starters.  (You should learn what a wumpus is.)

    Then you're going to want to learn some user-interface stuff.  Maybe some 2D graphics after that.  Write lots of puzzle games.

    Leave all the chaos of animation, 3D graphics, networking, and sound for after you've learned to crawl.

    When you do eventually get to writing your big game, you'll start by creating an "engine" that can display the world.  This is no small task.  But when you get here, if you've had enough experience, you'll realize that designing a huge D&D MMORPG starts the same way Hello World starts: you need an engine that can display the world.

    There's MY book, in a nutshell.  That'll be $39.99 please  ;)

    • Marked as answer by Jackie-Sun Monday, August 29, 2011 6:32 AM
    Friday, August 26, 2011 3:02 PM

All replies

  • http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/csharpgeneral/thread/b7bbea42-2cc2-4fc4-8bed-f0c3d5b0f2d6

    That is a current thread asking about books.  Learning a computer language is not easy, but not overly difficult.  Writing a program is not easy, but a little more difficult.  Writing a computer game is not easy, and can be difficult depending upon the nature of the game.

    The point I am making is that learning a computer language will not teach you how to write a computer game.  Let me compare it to learning to speak a foreign language so that you can write a screenplay for a movie.  First you need to learn the language, which teaches you nothing about writing a properly formatted screenplay.  Before you can learn the proper format for a screenplay, you will need to learn how it is used and learn the terminology used in the film business.

    Programming carries with it a certain set of concepts that are found in all computer languages.  Concepts such as variables, looping, subroutings, conditional branching, and more.  Each has a specific purpose, and all are combined in subtle and complex ways to serve a specific purpose.  Understanding these concepts are useful to resolving coding errors. 

    Finally, there is no substitute for brain busting experience.  I mean practicing your code writing skills and understanding  There is learning curve ahead of you.  There is a road ahead of you filled with all of the traps and mistakes that we have all have made, and have to make to move on.

    I suggest that you learn the whys as much as the whats and hows.  It will be a slower start, but will reward you with a quicker trip to the finish line. 

    Good luck.

    Rudy   =8^D


    Mark the best replies as answers. "Fooling computers since 1971."

    http://thesharpercoder.blogspot.com/


    • Marked as answer by DecalMan77 Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12:01 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by DecalMan77 Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12:04 AM
    Tuesday, August 23, 2011 11:44 PM
  • Thank you for the quick and great reply!!

    I liked your answer but thought maybe someone can still point me into the direction of the best way to get started.

    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12:01 AM
  • Those tutorials are a good start.  Get your hands on a good language reference book.  I recommend the ones published by Microsoft.  Even though the current version of Visual Studio is 2010, the older books for 2005 and 2008 may be a better place to start.  The newer books tend to focus on the newer features, which only confuse newcomers.

    And practice, practice, practice.  You may want to start reading questions that others have.  Try to understand them, or even solve them yourself.

    Programming Microsoft Visual C# 2008: The Language

    Rudy   =8^D 


    Mark the best replies as answers. "Fooling computers since 1971."

    http://thesharpercoder.blogspot.com/


    • Marked as answer by Jackie-Sun Monday, August 29, 2011 6:32 AM
    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 12:31 AM
  • When people on the forum post that they are interested in writing games and thinking of doing it in C# then you start to think what kind of game are they thinking about. You can create games in C# and some real good ones but if your talking PS3 games then C# is not the language, if your talking Zork then yeah C# will do, if you want to write a game for an Android mobile phone then Java, or maybe Objective C for iPod/iPad.

     

    For a console then two of the common games engines out there are Havok and Unreal. These are the big guns. Your find that programming games with these engines will be a split between 3D modelling and scripting.... but these are the tools the pros use (but I'm sure you could do a lot with a little bit of these engines). If you want to write games for a living then you should tend towards these two tools.

    http://www.havok.com/

    http://www.unrealengine.com/

     

    Then there is XNA, probably quite a good games engine to start out with if your wanting to learn C#, but the game will be xbox and windows PC only. Which is no small number or people. It would at least maybe give you a feel for what's involved.

     

    But the question should be what game do you want to write? and for what platform? and take it from there...


    "The programmer, like the poet, works only slightly removed from pure thought-stuff. He builds his castles in the air, from air, creating by exertion of the imagination." - Fred Brooks
    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 7:18 AM
  • Thats part of my problem I dont know the type of game yet, although If i had to give an idea it would more then likely be RPGish, sorta like D&D or Baulders Gate. How would C# do at that type of game?

    Should I even bother with C# or do another language? Because im not really looking for a career in it unless i get real good at it.  =)

    Platform wise? Windows PC/Xbox. Or just Windows PC would do.

     

    Curentally I have XNA/Microsoft Visual C# 2010 Express/Microsoft Visual Basic 2010 Express installed.

     

    Where should I start?

    Wednesday, August 24, 2011 8:02 PM
  • Probably start with PC, and actually C++ is a better language than C# for gamedevelopment. 
    http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-C-Through-Game-Programming/dp/1435457420/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1314241849&sr=1-1

    This book might be of use to you then.

    Regards,

    Dylan Meeus 


    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan
    Thursday, August 25, 2011 3:10 AM
  • One of the first things I learned in college was pick the best language for the job.

    Meaning you need to know what the job involves first and then pick the language. That's sort of what I'm helping you to do here. Understand what you want to do, the game, what will the player do? turn based text game, adventure game with battles, or just plain old killing people for fun in highly realistic enviroments. Without knowing that and getting a handle on that it's not going to be much of a game and if it isn't much of a game then it doesn't matter what language you program it in.

     

     

    First thing I learned in business is first pick the language then decide what jobs to do in it.


    "The programmer, like the poet, works only slightly removed from pure thought-stuff. He builds his castles in the air, from air, creating by exertion of the imagination." - Fred Brooks
    Thursday, August 25, 2011 7:29 AM
  • Probably start with PC, and actually C++ is a better language than C# for gamedevelopment. 
    http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-C-Through-Game-Programming/dp/1435457420/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1314241849&sr=1-1

    This book might be of use to you then.

    Regards,

    Dylan Meeus 


    0x2B |~ 0x2B Blog : www.it-ca.net/blogdylan

    Why would C++ be better? Isnt C# easier and faster to learn, and couldnt I make a game like I mentioned with C#?
    Thursday, August 25, 2011 7:32 PM
  • C++ is compiled to native machine code, where as C# is an interpreted language (when you compile a C# app, it writes it as MSIL, then the .net runtime makes that MSIL code native code on the fly when you run it). there is more overhead with C# than C++ which comes down to frame rate in your game... now, that being said, it depends on that game you want to make... if its got basic graphics and doesn�??t need a high FPS then C# is fine.. but if you are trying to make something where FPS matters, you might want to stay away from C#

    Justin Rich
    http://jrich523.wordpress.com
    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.
    Thursday, August 25, 2011 7:42 PM
  • yea but for a hobby and just starting out why not just use C#/XNA? (FPS shouldnt really matter in a slow paced RPGish game like I stated above)


    Thursday, August 25, 2011 8:09 PM
  • C++ is compiled to native machine code, where as C# is an interpreted language (when you compile a C# app, it writes it as MSIL, then the .net runtime makes that MSIL code native code on the fly when you run it). there is more overhead with C# than C++ which comes down to frame rate in your game... now, that being said, it depends on that game you want to make... if its got basic graphics and doesn�??t need a high FPS then C# is fine.. but if you are trying to make something where FPS matters, you might want to stay away from C#

    Justin Rich
    http://jrich523.wordpress.com
    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.
    Friday, August 26, 2011 2:11 PM
  • You have ZERO programming experience?  You're going to need to learn to crawl before you can walk...or run...or do gymnastics.

    I found Rudy's advice to be exactly what I would give.  It's a long road ahead.

    And yet there are always people on this forum that ask for books that guide them through the process.  I think that I always had a pretty good idea of what I was capable of, and would choose projects that pushed my limits.  No book ever guided me.  You just need to choose a good string of projects that help you grow and learn.

    "Hello World" is a good place to start!

    I think that random number generators are useful to be introduced to early on.  Guessing games and text-based interfaces are good for starters.  (You should learn what a wumpus is.)

    Then you're going to want to learn some user-interface stuff.  Maybe some 2D graphics after that.  Write lots of puzzle games.

    Leave all the chaos of animation, 3D graphics, networking, and sound for after you've learned to crawl.

    When you do eventually get to writing your big game, you'll start by creating an "engine" that can display the world.  This is no small task.  But when you get here, if you've had enough experience, you'll realize that designing a huge D&D MMORPG starts the same way Hello World starts: you need an engine that can display the world.

    There's MY book, in a nutshell.  That'll be $39.99 please  ;)

    • Marked as answer by Jackie-Sun Monday, August 29, 2011 6:32 AM
    Friday, August 26, 2011 3:02 PM
  • I learned how to program by starting with HTML, then going to Javascript, then Java, then C#. HTML teaches you how to remember programming things well, even though it is only a markup language.
    Friday, October 7, 2011 9:44 PM
  • Just some cents of mine, which mean nothing in comparison to Rudedog`s or someone else`s millions:

    I am in programming for almost 3 years, and I am constantly learing (read: every day - truely), reading books, doing example codes, doing projects (small ones), helping here on this and some others forums, AND...

    What I have learned so far: I am still not capable of doing some very demanding projects, like are games. Maybe I didn`t even try it hard yet to do a real Game (pc game) with all 3d graphisc and stuff, excect some small ones, which only need a code to work (in win forms). Even my knowledge is already quite big now, and its improving from day to day, Iam still not capable of starting coding a Game.

    So my point is, you 1st need to learn all the basics and beyond about OOP, and then start doing simple things, projects, small games, and after that, you can maybe think of some huge project of a real Game.

    I can tell you - to make one, you need to know a looot, and this a looot is so big, you cannot even imagine now. Not that I would frighten you, but this is how it is.

    So my advice - one step and a time, and do decent steps.


    Mitja
    • Edited by Mitja Bonca Friday, October 7, 2011 10:00 PM
    Friday, October 7, 2011 10:00 PM
  • Check out my Amazon rating of "Game programming for Teens" before you buy the book.   The code in the book works fine, but is not explained well, and, it uses fixed levels.   "C# Game Programming: For Serious Game Creation" is a far better book.

    There is a pretty good tutorial at:

    http://www.tiptoptool.com/spip.php?page=syndic_article&id_syndic_article=6368

     

    Best C# reference I have found is: 

    If you are new to C# you probably want a C# learning book too.
    If you are jst starting, do not expect to have a game done in a few days . . . . I just plug along, making changes and adding code, and eventually, I get to the end product, which in most cases, I then think of some other feature to add, so it goes on almost indefinately. . .
    • Proposed as answer by JCRobinson Saturday, October 8, 2011 1:48 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by JCRobinson Saturday, October 8, 2011 1:48 PM
    Saturday, October 8, 2011 12:52 PM