none
RPC over HTTP will be supported in the future? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am doing a research on RPC over HTTP. This protocol is supported by MS Exchange 2003, 2007. My question is:

    1. Will this protocoll also be supported for future Exchange Server Versions? Where can I get such information?
    2. The protocol specification is very abstract. Is there any concrete protocol example which can tell the details about the request and responses.

    Wednesday, January 14, 2009 1:07 PM

Answers

  • RPC over HTTP allows Outlook clients to access Microsoft Exchange servers by using the Exchange Server protocol to tunnel RPC requests inside an HTTP session, or tunnel.   If you use RPC over HTTP you can use your MAPI Client to access Exchange Server over the Internet, because HTTP is a common Internet protocol. The HTTP session terminates at a server running Internet Information Services that has support for RPC over HTTP proxy networking component installed.  The RPC over HTTP Proxy networking component extracts the RPC requests from the HTTP request and forwards the RPC requests to the appropriate server.  

     

    A common misconception is that the use of RPC over HTTP turns a Web request into an RPC request.   Client sends the RPC request inside an HTTP tunnel. The actual RPC request does not change between the Outlook client and the Exchange server.   

     

    Based on your questions specific to a MAPI client is really adding about adding functionality at the MAPI transport to support for RPC over HTTP.  Here is an MSDN article covering RPC over HTTP.

     

    As for future proofing the evidence that Microsoft is publishing the [MS-RPCH] is a very strong indicator of protecting your investment.  

     

    One thing that I have found helpful in my learning of the protocols is to use the Microsoft Network Monitor (which can be downloaded here). 


    Microsoft has published Network Monitor parsers for the
    Windows Open Protocol Specifications.   The Network Monitor parsers are a separate download and you can find the source and the installer for the parsers at CodePlex.   I personally have found this helpful in learning and debugging the protocols.

     

    If you have questions specific to the Windows Open Protocol Specifications please post your questions to the Windows Protocol Forum.  And questions specific to the Exchange Server protocol documentation feel free to post to this forum.


    Developer Consultant
    Tuesday, January 27, 2009 5:59 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi, o3sisuser,


    Thanks for your post.

    We'll be contacting you shortly to help you address your questions.

    Regards,


    SEBASTIAN CANEVARI - MSFT Senior SEE Protocol Documentation Team
    Wednesday, January 14, 2009 2:50 PM
  • Hi, o3sisuser,


    Thanks for your post.

    We'll be contacting you shortly to help you address your questions.

    Regards,

    Wednesday, January 14, 2009 4:04 PM
  • Hi o3sisuser,

    I'll be providing you with a more complete answer as soon as I put it together.

    In the meanwhile, I need some clarification from your end.

    When you are talking about the RPC/HTTP protocol, are you referring exclusively to the Exchange implementation or to the protocol itself?

    You've mentioned that the protocol documentation is very abstract. I'm wondering what document you are referring to:

    1) [MS-RPCH] ? : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc243950(PROT.10).aspx
    2) [MS-OXCRPC] ? :http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc425493.aspx

    Last and not least, regarding the examples, I want to make sure that you were able to review the ones on MS-OXCRPC and the information on MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa375384(VS.85).aspx


    As stated, I'll be back with some more information specially regarding your question #1. It would greately improve the accuracy of it if you are able to provide me with the requested clarifications.

    Thanks and regards,


    SEBASTIAN CANEVARI - MSFT Senior SEE Protocol Documentation Team
    Wednesday, January 14, 2009 5:04 PM
  • hi Sebastian,

    i am refering the Exchange Implementation.
    In our current project, a MS  Exchange server access application is already available. This application works well in LAN and is baced on MAPI interface. Can we just wrap the MAPI request and resoponse and make the application also useful for the clients which try to access email and contacts from internet.

    Please give me your suggestion!

    Best Regards
    Thursday, January 15, 2009 9:12 AM
  • Hi Sebastian,

    i am referring this document:

    [MS-RPCH] ? : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc243950(PROT.10).aspx

    Cheers


    Thursday, January 15, 2009 9:15 AM
  •  

    Greetings,
    We can't speculate about future products until they start to become reality. I have not heard of any proposed changes to RPC over HTTP but we will have to wait until closer to the release of Office 14 and/or a new Exchange.

    There are no example code projects. If you have any specific questions we would be glad to answer them here.

     


    Steve Smegner
    Application Development Consulting Group

    • Marked as answer by Steve Smegner Monday, January 19, 2009 10:00 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by o3sisuser Thursday, January 22, 2009 10:49 AM
    Monday, January 19, 2009 10:00 PM
  • RPC over HTTP allows Outlook clients to access Microsoft Exchange servers by using the Exchange Server protocol to tunnel RPC requests inside an HTTP session, or tunnel.   If you use RPC over HTTP you can use your MAPI Client to access Exchange Server over the Internet, because HTTP is a common Internet protocol. The HTTP session terminates at a server running Internet Information Services that has support for RPC over HTTP proxy networking component installed.  The RPC over HTTP Proxy networking component extracts the RPC requests from the HTTP request and forwards the RPC requests to the appropriate server.  

     

    A common misconception is that the use of RPC over HTTP turns a Web request into an RPC request.   Client sends the RPC request inside an HTTP tunnel. The actual RPC request does not change between the Outlook client and the Exchange server.   

     

    Based on your questions specific to a MAPI client is really adding about adding functionality at the MAPI transport to support for RPC over HTTP.  Here is an MSDN article covering RPC over HTTP.

     

    As for future proofing the evidence that Microsoft is publishing the [MS-RPCH] is a very strong indicator of protecting your investment.  

     

    One thing that I have found helpful in my learning of the protocols is to use the Microsoft Network Monitor (which can be downloaded here). 


    Microsoft has published Network Monitor parsers for the
    Windows Open Protocol Specifications.   The Network Monitor parsers are a separate download and you can find the source and the installer for the parsers at CodePlex.   I personally have found this helpful in learning and debugging the protocols.

     

    If you have questions specific to the Windows Open Protocol Specifications please post your questions to the Windows Protocol Forum.  And questions specific to the Exchange Server protocol documentation feel free to post to this forum.


    Developer Consultant
    Tuesday, January 27, 2009 5:59 PM
    Moderator