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A bit of a stretch? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Isn't it a bit of a stretch to put SSIS and SSAS together in this "add-in" and expect the typical Excel user to know what to do with them?

    I find it hard enough to get certain Excel users to use VLOOKUP's for bringing together their data columns.  Do we expect them to become ETL and OLAP specialists?

    I think this product will generate a lot more problems than it solves. 

    That's my constructive criticism.  I'm sure there will be an audience for this tool but it is probably just the limited few people who are already doing the BI work anyway.
    Friday, December 4, 2009 2:57 AM

Answers

  • The expection is that the Excel power user in an organization will do the heavy lifting, and the end user will consume the data within the PowerPivot model, similar to way they would consume OLAP cube data in Excel today.  If the requirements are too complex for the internal power user, then calling in a third party to do the work should still be less costly than building or modifying a traditional OLAP cube (which isn't well suited for ad-hoc type queries anyway). 

    I don't see anything related to SSIS or ETL in PowerPivot (I wish), and you don't have a know anything about OLAP to build and deploy your models.
    Friday, December 4, 2009 7:53 PM
  • Colin is right on.

    The modeling tool is designed for the Excel power user, who is familiar with VLOOKUP although they might not be very familiar with database terms such as “primary key” and “foreign key” and “referential integrity constraints”.  Thus the Client add-in uses terms like “lookup” and “relationship”, something we believe that the power user would be comfortable with.

    Another power also comes with publishing the PowerPivot data to SharePoint and enable the end users to view the reports through thin-client browser using Excel Services under SharePoint.

    Thanks!
    Lisa

    Tuesday, December 8, 2009 10:26 PM

All replies

  • The expection is that the Excel power user in an organization will do the heavy lifting, and the end user will consume the data within the PowerPivot model, similar to way they would consume OLAP cube data in Excel today.  If the requirements are too complex for the internal power user, then calling in a third party to do the work should still be less costly than building or modifying a traditional OLAP cube (which isn't well suited for ad-hoc type queries anyway). 

    I don't see anything related to SSIS or ETL in PowerPivot (I wish), and you don't have a know anything about OLAP to build and deploy your models.
    Friday, December 4, 2009 7:53 PM
  • Colin is right on.

    The modeling tool is designed for the Excel power user, who is familiar with VLOOKUP although they might not be very familiar with database terms such as “primary key” and “foreign key” and “referential integrity constraints”.  Thus the Client add-in uses terms like “lookup” and “relationship”, something we believe that the power user would be comfortable with.

    Another power also comes with publishing the PowerPivot data to SharePoint and enable the end users to view the reports through thin-client browser using Excel Services under SharePoint.

    Thanks!
    Lisa

    Tuesday, December 8, 2009 10:26 PM
  • Count me in as the target market for this product. I am a "power user" but hampered by what's available.  It's the right product at the right time as I am constantly asked for more data - more market analysis - more depth of sales info.   This product, coupled with the Slicers in Excel 2010 is a near perfect fit.  It's already saved me hours in reports and using measures and hopefully brushing up on some DAX, I hope to tap even more depth into market awareness.

    The caveat is that I (and other users) can not use this product to it's full potential as Sharepoint is a different sale to try to make.  So, am I aware of BI - yes.  CUBE, SSAS, SSIS - nope.  Do I need to - well it's always nice to learn new things, but if I can master what I need out of PowerPivot and DAX, then colour me a satisfied customer.

    I consider this product like Mappoint - a nice niche product and very helpful if you can utilize it fully.  Is it essential?  No.  Can I do my work around it - yes.  But coupled with Excel 2010, does it have the potential to save me time, effort and throw in some oohs and ahhhs my way.  That being said, like an Microsoft product, there will be days where I will curse it.  But as stated - is it for everyone? No, but I'm grateful it's available (and dumbed down).
    Wednesday, December 16, 2009 7:31 PM