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Continue Supporting Classic ASP Indefinitely RRS feed

  • Question

  • User1739432 posted

    I've heard a lot of rumors about Classic ASP being one day being unsupported entirely in IIS sometime in the next decade.

    My feedback:  keep supporting it.

    I realize that its old and its DLL is written in VB6 which is also old,  and there's plenty to complain about in regards to lack of updates. But there's still demand to use for it on the world wide web that isn't fading off as fast as you might think.

    I like to gauge the level of continued-usage by looking to Google. You can search for filetypes and get a count for each like so:

    filetype:asp

    Near the top of the page it gives you a count for the number of results returned. So today I decided to compare the number returned for various common file types found in search results. Here are the results that were returned:

    Google Search Count Returned
    filetype:php
    
    About 9,030,000,000 results
    filetype:asp
    
    About 1,340,000,000 results
    filetype:aspx
    
    About 1,830,000,000 results
    filetype:jsp
    
    About 434,000,000 results
    filetype:cgi
    
    About 315,000,000 results
    filetype:py
    
    About 75,000,000 results
    filetype:pl
    
    About 118,000,000 results
    filetype:html
    
    About 14,500,000,000 results
    filetype:htm
    
    About 738,000,000 results


    If we use these numbers as an indicator for popularity, clearly Classic ASP's level is nowhere near that of the mighty PHP. However, its not terribly far behind that of ASP.NET either. And it seems certianly more popular than some of the others shown. So my argument is: why throw away something that works and is still being used? Seems an awful waste.

    Thursday, November 21, 2013 11:27 AM

All replies

  • User-1853252149 posted

    1)  Ignore rumors.

    2) ASP Classic hasn't been supported in years.  The interpreter hasn't changed, there's been no development to the scripting language and it hasn't changed in processing since IIS 4.

    3)  ASP Classic is just a script and an an interpreter.  It's not maintained, not updated and doesn't need any support in IIS terms.  Why would it magically go away?

    4)  Ten years is a long time.  Hopefully you'll have moved into the current world before then.

    5)  The people who make the decision to remove support aren't normally reading this forum.

    Jeff

    Monday, December 2, 2013 3:38 PM
  • User-2064283741 posted

    I was going to reply with much of what Jeff said and to be honest I wish we would see the back of it and I know there is so much of it about. I am consulting at the moment migrating a load of legacy classic asp site to the AWS cloud.

    And I was curious and goggled it and it seems you are in luck.

    The use of ASP pages "will be supported on Windows 8 for a minimum of 10 years from the Windows 8 release date" You have nearly a decade of classic asp support!

    Here is the official page:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2669020

    What support means is another matter entirely. Online support is here on Forums.iis.net (only because strangely classic asp "belongs" to the IIS team) but I doubt  you will see any support from MS staff and it is forum that no-one wants to host......

    Maybe you can reply back to this thread in say 2022 and ask again if you want to support it indefinitely.

    Wednesday, December 4, 2013 12:50 PM
  • User-1853252149 posted

    By the way, the 10 year support is for Windows 8, not specifically ASP Classic.  It may be that ASP Classic is dropped in Windows 9 and you'd need to continue running Windows 8 for a decade to use ASP Classic.

    My guess (Only a guess) is that ASP Classic will always be available.  It's basically a DLL that runs to interpret ASP scripts, no real support is needed other than to have that DLL available and associated with the .asp extension.  Until that DLL no longer will work on a new operating system, there wouldn't be any reason to remove it.

    Eventually all the ASP Classic programmers will retire and it will be a dead language.  :)

    Jeff

    Friday, December 6, 2013 8:54 AM
  • User-1415258673 posted

    3)  ASP Classic is just a script and an an interpreter.  It's not maintained, not updated and doesn't need any support in IIS terms.  Why would it magically go away?


    Because that's the Microsoft way.  Prime example, my HTC HD2 Windows Mobile 6.5 phone.  I bought it from T-Mobile, was still under my 2 year contract window, when Microsoft announced they were discontinuing the Windows Marketplace for Windows Mobile and shut it down.  Pleas from many of 6.5 users fell on deaf ears to at least minimally keep it open for existing apps until at least another year when our 2 year lifecycle on our contacts expired.  And it was ironic since the OS was, essentially, still very much alive and still being marketed for years after that as Windows Embedded Handheld 6.5

    And then it was discontinued.  And to get any sort of apps for WM 6.5, you had to utilize search engines.

    Microsoft can be known to EOL things prematurely when they're just "done" with the product.  I honestly contemplated moving off the MS ecosystem at that point after being a MS cheerleader for so long.  It's frustrating as all get out when we buy in to things and MS decides to half ass it, discontinue it, and then end support for it and treat it like the drunk uncle who they wish wouldn't come around for the holidays. *cough Zune cough*

    Wednesday, December 3, 2014 1:46 AM
  • User118728732 posted

    I like to gauge the level of continued-usage by looking to Google. You can search for filetypes and get a count for each like so

    This is entirely inaccurate as a very large number of people use URL rewriting and don't actually show file extensions on their URLs.

    Monday, March 9, 2015 1:26 PM
  • User-740003957 posted

    I bet my company will want this to be supported indefinitely.Embarassed  It is an interesting topic if not annoying,.  Been task to see if there is an end date to support ASP Classic from time to time and come to some interesting pages on the Internet. Guess since this technology was stop being developed before Microsoft used any Life Cycle Management process, it seems it is just being ignored. That's it biggest problem.

    The Server.CreateObject seems to odd memory leak or allocation problem on Windows Server 2008. I'm hoping one day to upgrade the sites to Windows Server/IIS version where it simply doesn't run.

    Monday, March 30, 2015 3:08 PM
  • User374894602 posted

    When you know how to configure IIS 7.5, Classic ASP runs very smoothly and without any memory leaks (despite of some rumors!) on Windows Server 2008.

    Considering :

    - the fact that ASP is now just "a .DLL" with ISAPI,

    - the fact that very large companies are still using it (including the Barclays bank (yes yes !),

    - the fact that Microsoft does not offer any alternative, and does not want to see all these ASP websites "left in the country" and definitely switch to a non-Microsoft platform for their whole entire life,

    - the fact that Classic ASP is more recent than Cgi, that keeps being run in IIS,

    I conclude, and hope, and want, and predict that Microsoft will/would/should continue supporting this "good-old-powerful" scripting language.

    Tuesday, July 14, 2015 1:11 PM
  • User1565574454 posted

    You forgot one interesting file type that I think is worth looking at.

    Currently (August 2016):

    cshtml: 1,720,000

    cshtml is very similar to ASP in concept.  It brings back the idea of embedded server-side code in the markup - the thing that makes ASP so powerful, and the thing that drives purists insane.  ;-)  And, it's current and supported.

    Personally, I believe cshtml/Razor (or .vbhtml) is Microsoft swinging back around to pick up all the ASP developers it left behind in the switch to .NET.

    Wednesday, August 3, 2016 8:36 PM
  • User1309806134 posted

    Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10 Pro  uses  IIS10.   In Windows 10 Pro, you can enable ASP under "Turn on Windows Features" just like IIS 8.x manager.  IIS10 manager still has the classic pipeline mode for the app pool.

    I will download WK216 and verify it but in my opinion, Classic ASP is still available in Windows Server 2016.   Is it supported? No because, there has not been any improvement with classic ASP.  Yes because you can still run ASP in IIS10.

    Wednesday, October 12, 2016 6:24 PM
  • User-663891294 posted

    As long as ASP is shipped with Windows, it is supported: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2669020.

    Thursday, October 13, 2016 10:55 PM
  • User-273378081 posted

    I highly agree with you. I work for a company with a large ASP site, and converting to .NET would be next to impossible. 15 years of development is not easy to go re-develop.

    I just wrote a Database Session class so I can go find/replace    Session("   and replace with DBSession("  

    The class is instantiated in such a way that if it already has been declared, it's ignored. Thus allowing me to also code a script to put an include in the top of Every single ASP file to include the class file :)

    Now I can have 20 worker processes and multiple servers in my farm running an ASP site!

    Thursday, November 17, 2016 12:50 PM
  • User-57091025 posted

    cshtml is very similar to ASP in concept.  It brings back the idea of embedded server-side code in the markup - the thing that makes ASP so powerful, and the thing that drives purists insane.  ;-)  And, it's current and supported.

    Personally, I believe cshtml/Razor (or .vbhtml) is Microsoft swinging back around to pick up all the ASP developers it left behind in the switch to .NET.

    One reads quite a lot about standalone Razor pages.  What a lot of people don't seem to realise is that one can take a similar approach with an aspx page.  There's no need to use web controls and codebehinds, code in whatever the language the page is in can be used inside <% %> or <%= %> in exactly the same way as Classic ASP.  Obviously the delimiters would need to contain VB.net or C# rather than VBScript or JScript.

    This is particularly useful if one adds 'ASPCompat-"true"' to the page declaration, as it enables the use of COM objects.  VB.net isn't quite the same as VBScript so some changes to the code are necessary, but this offers a very quick route to convert an asp page to an aspx one

    Wednesday, February 1, 2017 4:42 PM