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32 or 64 bits? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a laptop of 64bit, I want to run Moss in Window server 08 ,please advise me which version of window server 2008 is better, window server 2008 32 bit or 64 bit?

    Thanks.
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 2:47 AM

Answers

  • Better is a relative I guess.  From everything I've seen the 64bit flavor takes better advantage of resources, but it may not matter if you have only a little memory.  I'm not sure I've seen many laptops with 4Gb + of RAM. 

    Another consideration I might have is what else needs to run on the system and whether all the needed apps are available in 64bit versions.

    SharePoint Developer | Administrator | Evangelist Twitter - https://twitter.com/next_connect
    • Marked as answer by Mike Walsh FIN Tuesday, February 3, 2009 5:12 AM
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 4:10 AM
  • I would also recommend using the x64 version to make it easier to migrate to the next version of SharePoint once its released.  It will only be available for 64-bit hardware and software, so if you go that direction now its one less moving part you have to be concerned about when it comes time to upgrade.

    John

    MCTS: WSS v3, MOSS 2007, and SCOM 2007 ******* Now Available on Amazon - the SharePoint 2007 Disaster Recovery Guide: http://is.gd/da9q
    • Marked as answer by Jake Wardley Tuesday, February 3, 2009 8:42 PM
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 1:33 PM
  • >I would also recommend using the x64 version to make it easier to migrate to the next version of SharePoint 

    I thought of that when I marked Mike's post. I decided that it not being mentioned didn't matter in marking that post as an answer because we are talking here about a laptop and thus presumably test system rather than a product system. By the time the next version of SP comes out that laptop will no longer be state of the art and in any case the testing on it will have moved on to the beta version of the next version of SP I'd guess and then it's probably a good idea to start over from scratch with a new installation.

    I also am very much aware of the lack of drivers for 64-bit systems having tried 64-bit Vista for a while ...

    (I still wish I'd written your comment in a reply at the time, though :) )

    WSS FAQ sites: WSS 2.0: http://wssv2faq.mindsharp.com WSS 3.0 and MOSS 2007: http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com
    Total list of WSS 3.0 and MOSS 2007 Books (including foreign language titles) http://wss.asaris.de/sites/walsh/Lists/WSSv3%20FAQ/V%20Books.aspx
    • Marked as answer by Jake Wardley Tuesday, February 3, 2009 8:42 PM
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 4:56 PM

All replies

  • Better is a relative I guess.  From everything I've seen the 64bit flavor takes better advantage of resources, but it may not matter if you have only a little memory.  I'm not sure I've seen many laptops with 4Gb + of RAM. 

    Another consideration I might have is what else needs to run on the system and whether all the needed apps are available in 64bit versions.

    SharePoint Developer | Administrator | Evangelist Twitter - https://twitter.com/next_connect
    • Marked as answer by Mike Walsh FIN Tuesday, February 3, 2009 5:12 AM
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 4:10 AM
  • I would also recommend using the x64 version to make it easier to migrate to the next version of SharePoint once its released.  It will only be available for 64-bit hardware and software, so if you go that direction now its one less moving part you have to be concerned about when it comes time to upgrade.

    John

    MCTS: WSS v3, MOSS 2007, and SCOM 2007 ******* Now Available on Amazon - the SharePoint 2007 Disaster Recovery Guide: http://is.gd/da9q
    • Marked as answer by Jake Wardley Tuesday, February 3, 2009 8:42 PM
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 1:33 PM
  • >I would also recommend using the x64 version to make it easier to migrate to the next version of SharePoint 

    I thought of that when I marked Mike's post. I decided that it not being mentioned didn't matter in marking that post as an answer because we are talking here about a laptop and thus presumably test system rather than a product system. By the time the next version of SP comes out that laptop will no longer be state of the art and in any case the testing on it will have moved on to the beta version of the next version of SP I'd guess and then it's probably a good idea to start over from scratch with a new installation.

    I also am very much aware of the lack of drivers for 64-bit systems having tried 64-bit Vista for a while ...

    (I still wish I'd written your comment in a reply at the time, though :) )

    WSS FAQ sites: WSS 2.0: http://wssv2faq.mindsharp.com WSS 3.0 and MOSS 2007: http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com
    Total list of WSS 3.0 and MOSS 2007 Books (including foreign language titles) http://wss.asaris.de/sites/walsh/Lists/WSSv3%20FAQ/V%20Books.aspx
    • Marked as answer by Jake Wardley Tuesday, February 3, 2009 8:42 PM
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 4:56 PM
  • I agree with Mike W, the context of your usage does make a big difference. He's completely right, the long term considerations I mentioned previously probably aren't as big of an issue if you're doing this on a laptop.

    If you're installing Windows Server 2008 directly to your laptop's bare metal, I'd probably go with 32-bit b/c you've got a better shot at finding working drivers for your laptop's hardware. But I don't know that I'd recommend that with 2008 in general, pretty much everyone I've heard of doing that has ended up going back to a client OS like XP or Vista b/c of issues finding drivers for laptop hardware such as wireless cards and bluetooth.

    Personally I've been running Vista x64 on a Dell Latitude D830 for a year and a half so far and haven't had many problems with drivers (a recent update disabled my touchpad, but that was it). I like x64 b/c (as Mike O mentions it gives you more RAM to access), so I can comfortably run virtual machines in Virtual PC, which is how I do most of my MOSS testing and development. The big drawback to Virtual PC is that it only allows for 32-bit guest VMs, but I'm not too worried about that. Although it can be time consuming to build a new machine, I also think its a great way to refresh your skills and stay sharp.

    Just my two cents,

    John

    MCTS: WSS v3, MOSS 2007, and SCOM 2007 ******* Now Available on Amazon - the SharePoint 2007 Disaster Recovery Guide: http://is.gd/da9q
    Tuesday, February 3, 2009 8:44 PM