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How much does each new major release of Entity Framework effect other APIs in the .NET Framework? RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1851576699 posted

    I was just browsing through the Visual Studio 2015 "Object Browser" and noticed that the "System.Data.Entity" assembly is still a member of ASP.Net Version 4.6. So, this led me to begin thinking about what effect the newest Entity Framework release might have on the base "ASP.NET Version 4.6" .DLL libraries.

    I have read that Entity Framework version 7.0 is a complete rewrite of the Entity Framework. But my curiosity is about how far that re-write extends into/alters/or affects other very well established .DLLs.  Are there any rules about not crossing over into other already well established APIs for this re-write of Entity Framework 7?

    Would that would be a bad philosophy to go back and start altering well established APIs for the sake of rewriting another API? Can Entity Framework version 7 accomplish its goals of being modernized without altering well established APIs...or is this a necessary evil of the continual evolution of software?

    So, to summarize my hard to phrase question, does Entity Framework rewrite version 7, effect any APIs outside itself, and if so, to what degree? And how could I find out what APIs are being effected?

    Just for curiosity sake. It's hard to keep up with all the changes.

    Edit #1: I think my question can be generalized to the underlying philosophies of updating any API. I am also curious about how the release of MVC 6 will affect the base class libraries, if at all. But I thought this was a good place to start since EF 7 is upon us and it is a complete rewrite.

    Edit #2: Another way to phrase my question. If Entity Framework 7 wants to accomplish a set goal, and it is dependent upon other .DLLs to accomplish those goals, and this reveals inadequacies in the .DLLs Entity Framework is depending on, is that a justification to alter the .DLLs Entity Framework is dependent upon for accomplishing its goals? Is this a valid practice or a dangerous one to be avoided at all costs? Or somewhere in between?

    Saturday, June 20, 2015 12:38 PM

Answers

  • User-821857111 posted

    But I guess the kicker here is, that while both ASP.Net MVC and Entity Framework are now open-source projects, Microsoft is original author of both APIs. So, I imagine, if they really wanted to modify the more established APIs in the name of making everything meld together more cohesively, they certainly have the power to do so.
    Well, they won't. That's why ASP.NET 5 and EF 7 are being introduced. Rather than break the existing versions to deliver greater extensibility and a more lightweight API, they are introducing new versions entirely.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:43 PM

All replies

  • User-821857111 posted

    Are there any rules about not crossing over into other already well established APIs for this re-write of Entity Framework 7?
    Just one rule: you don't do it. If you need new features, you create them separately. You don't introduce breaking changes into existing APIs to deliver those features.

    Saturday, June 20, 2015 1:26 PM
  • User-1851576699 posted

    I am glad to hear that from the perspective of having well established APIs not morph into something unrecognizable over time. Well, I guess this could happen anyway but maybe it could be justified on shortcomings of the assembly itself and not anything outside of itself.

    But I guess the kicker here is, that while both ASP.Net MVC and Entity Framework are now open-source projects, Microsoft is original author of both APIs. So, I imagine, if they really wanted to modify the more established APIs in the name of making everything meld together more cohesively, they certainly have the power to do so.

    But again, I am glad to hear this is not the case. :)

    Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:28 PM
  • User-821857111 posted

    But I guess the kicker here is, that while both ASP.Net MVC and Entity Framework are now open-source projects, Microsoft is original author of both APIs. So, I imagine, if they really wanted to modify the more established APIs in the name of making everything meld together more cohesively, they certainly have the power to do so.
    Well, they won't. That's why ASP.NET 5 and EF 7 are being introduced. Rather than break the existing versions to deliver greater extensibility and a more lightweight API, they are introducing new versions entirely.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:43 PM