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Does the "branch" let the project slowly? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello there.

    Actualy I use the Source Safe 2005 and I want to change to the Team Foundation 2012.

    When we finish a version we make a backup of the source safe folder and start a new version.

    So, I have 2 source safe folders, the current version (running on the client) and the new version (developing).

    When a bug is found we fix on both versions.

    Using the TFS2012 I will use the "branch" option to do a backup.

    So, my structure will be:

    $/Project
    $/Project/Sales
    $/Project/Order
    $/Project/Backup x
    $/Project/Backup x/Sales
    $/Project/Backup x/Order

    I want to know if many backup exists my project will be slowly to get latest version, check out and check in.



    Peterson Roberto Oliveira Seridonio
    Desenvolvedor C#
    MCTS Windows 7

    Thursday, July 18, 2013 12:56 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Thanks for your post!

    Organizations often need a branching strategy to support large, complex development efforts involving multiple development teams or feature teams working in parallel. Individual developers use local workspaces to isolate their changes from others on their team. The cost of branching is the resulting effort needed to merge code between branches and to resolve merge conflicts that always seem to present themselves. Adding an integration layer doubles the merges and likely doubles the effort to resolve merge conflicts. So If you just use branch for backup, I think it will not affect the efficiency.

    For more information, please refer to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/gg598921.aspx

    Hope it helps!

    Best Regards,


    Cathy Kong
    MSDN Community Support | Feedback to us
    Develop and promote your apps in Windows Store
    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.

    Friday, July 19, 2013 8:52 AM
    Moderator
  • But looking at pure performance to get the project and build it, you should not see much of a difference.

    You can use the Cloak feature while making a mapping (or from the source control explorer) to limit the amount of files being downloaded automatically on a get latest. 

    Your TFS database will grow, but you need to torture it pretty much before you'll start noticing the effects of branches over having none.


    My blog: blog.jessehouwing.nl

    Friday, July 19, 2013 7:12 PM
  • Peterson Roberto Oliveira Seridonio,

    Ok. Got it. Thanks!

    To coming back to your original question having multiple branches will not create a performance problem with TFS. TFS is capable to scale/support large enterprise software development projects. In production it is already supporting very large source code repository with multiple advance branching structure. So you can rely on TFS.

    In that case you need to follow the basic branching plan as given below. This branching strategy will give proven benefits in the long run.

    In case you are interested to get more details please use the branching guide from codeplex. ( http://vsarbranchingguide.codeplex.com/


    Cheers KSR

    Friday, August 2, 2013 1:43 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Thanks for your post!

    Organizations often need a branching strategy to support large, complex development efforts involving multiple development teams or feature teams working in parallel. Individual developers use local workspaces to isolate their changes from others on their team. The cost of branching is the resulting effort needed to merge code between branches and to resolve merge conflicts that always seem to present themselves. Adding an integration layer doubles the merges and likely doubles the effort to resolve merge conflicts. So If you just use branch for backup, I think it will not affect the efficiency.

    For more information, please refer to http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/gg598921.aspx

    Hope it helps!

    Best Regards,


    Cathy Kong
    MSDN Community Support | Feedback to us
    Develop and promote your apps in Windows Store
    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.

    Friday, July 19, 2013 8:52 AM
    Moderator
  • But looking at pure performance to get the project and build it, you should not see much of a difference.

    You can use the Cloak feature while making a mapping (or from the source control explorer) to limit the amount of files being downloaded automatically on a get latest. 

    Your TFS database will grow, but you need to torture it pretty much before you'll start noticing the effects of branches over having none.


    My blog: blog.jessehouwing.nl

    Friday, July 19, 2013 7:12 PM
  • Thanks for the answers.

    Peterson Roberto Oliveira Seridonio
    Desenvolvedor C#
    MCTS Windows 7

    Tuesday, July 23, 2013 11:52 AM
  • Why you need a backup when TFS maintains all the history data for you.

    Branch is purely for the "Parallel" Development.

    If you want to back up you need to plan to take SQL Server database back up. That is where all your data stored. This is not similar to VSS (File based version control).

    But having more branches will not impact on your performance.


    Cheers KSR

    Tuesday, July 30, 2013 12:11 PM
  • Why you need a backup when TFS maintains all the history data for you.

    Branch is purely for the "Parallel" Development.

    If you want to back up you need to plan to take SQL Server database back up. That is where all your data stored. This is not similar to VSS (File based version control).

    But having more branches will not impact on your performance.


    Cheers KSR

    Like I said in my post, i need a backup to fix bugs in the current version of my software while i develop the new version.

    While the version 1.0 is running on my client, a bug can appear and I need to fix it. But the version 1.1 can been in development yet. So, I need to fix it on the "version backup".

    It's not a safety backup.


    Peterson Roberto Oliveira Seridonio
    Desenvolvedor C#
    MCTS Windows 7

    Thursday, August 1, 2013 3:57 PM
  • Peterson Roberto Oliveira Seridonio,

    Ok. Got it. Thanks!

    To coming back to your original question having multiple branches will not create a performance problem with TFS. TFS is capable to scale/support large enterprise software development projects. In production it is already supporting very large source code repository with multiple advance branching structure. So you can rely on TFS.

    In that case you need to follow the basic branching plan as given below. This branching strategy will give proven benefits in the long run.

    In case you are interested to get more details please use the branching guide from codeplex. ( http://vsarbranchingguide.codeplex.com/


    Cheers KSR

    Friday, August 2, 2013 1:43 PM