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Spcification of web services you need from third-party company RRS feed

  • Question

  • I want third-party company to implement bunch of web services. I wonder what it is the best way to specify them. I can create wsdl for them, is it ok? Interoperability is very important because services will run on non-windows machine and clients will run on windows boxes.

    thanks in advance for any info

    Tuesday, January 24, 2006 11:53 AM

Answers

  • Pawel,

    Regardless of whether you are dealing with an external or internal consumer WSDL should be your primary mechanism for exposing the interface into your business logic.  You'll want to make sure your adhering to some of the primary tenets for building reusable (SOA style) services (I'm making some assumptions here that you want to be service-oriented with the varying consumers of this service).  Read the first two sections of this article http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/04/01/indigo/default.aspx .  Additionally I would add that WSDL will probably fall short for some things that you are probably going to start dealing with.  You really want to look at WS-Policy to extend more information to the consumers about how they can interact with your service (http://webservices.sys-con.com/read/45103.htm).

    Now as far as contract first is concerned ... I don't disagree with the other posts on this thread that contract first is a good way to help ensure interop.  But,  I just want to be sure you understand that simply hand-crafting your WSDL does not stop you from making some potential errors that will lead to problems.  I would take a look at this post from Mr. Interop (Simon Guest)http://blogs.msdn.com/smguest/archive/2004/08/12/213659.aspx . 

    In closing,  much of this depends on how many consumers you are expecting to use this service.  Putting all of this effort into a service that will be for only a couple of consumers is likely not worth it.  The sophistication of your consumers may become a problem as well,  the idea of generating and shipping the proxies for them does seem to be something you shouldn't have to do but at the end of the day you want people to use your service so doing whatever it takes to help foster adoption (especially in the beginning) is probably worth it.

    Good luck and I hope this in some way helps.

    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 12:12 PM

All replies

  • Pawel,

    Are you saying that you want them to use web services that you  have implemented? We have toyed with this question ourselves. There are, basically, two avenues of approach:

    1. Deploy your wsdl in a public or client-accessible arena, point them to it, and wish them luck.
    2. Or, what we have considered, and begun doing, is creating a packaged set of classes (both Java and .Net versions) which allows interaction with the service. This can be ideal because it allows you to control the access, however, it sort of defeats the purpose. In most cases, for us, we are dealing with clients who have...difficulty...grasping a Service Oriented culture shall we say.

    Either way, I don't think you'll have to worry much about interoperability as long as you don't go off the deep end. Generally speaking, a Windows-based client should be able to consume any WSDL (no matter it's base platform).

    Tuesday, January 24, 2006 1:48 PM
  • 3rd Party development?

    Interoperability == keep contract first development in mind...

     

    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 6:57 AM
  • Thaks for response but I am saying that I want them to develop web services that I am going to consume. I wonder what is the best way to specify them in order to be as much precise as possible.
    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 10:00 AM
  • Yes, I know but I wonder what the best approach is. Should I prepare wsdl for them or maybe any other format seems to be more useful?
    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 10:02 AM
  • Yeap.. Thats what I am refering to as well...

    To be precise, you should adopt a contract first development method.

    So what you do is generate a contract which will act as a .. well.. contract between you and the third party.

    So when the third party is developing a web-service, as long as they keep the contract in mind, they will be precise...

     

     

    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 10:07 AM
  • You can check this out for more info http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/05/05/ServiceStation/

    HTHs...

    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 10:14 AM
  • Pawel,

    Regardless of whether you are dealing with an external or internal consumer WSDL should be your primary mechanism for exposing the interface into your business logic.  You'll want to make sure your adhering to some of the primary tenets for building reusable (SOA style) services (I'm making some assumptions here that you want to be service-oriented with the varying consumers of this service).  Read the first two sections of this article http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/04/01/indigo/default.aspx .  Additionally I would add that WSDL will probably fall short for some things that you are probably going to start dealing with.  You really want to look at WS-Policy to extend more information to the consumers about how they can interact with your service (http://webservices.sys-con.com/read/45103.htm).

    Now as far as contract first is concerned ... I don't disagree with the other posts on this thread that contract first is a good way to help ensure interop.  But,  I just want to be sure you understand that simply hand-crafting your WSDL does not stop you from making some potential errors that will lead to problems.  I would take a look at this post from Mr. Interop (Simon Guest)http://blogs.msdn.com/smguest/archive/2004/08/12/213659.aspx . 

    In closing,  much of this depends on how many consumers you are expecting to use this service.  Putting all of this effort into a service that will be for only a couple of consumers is likely not worth it.  The sophistication of your consumers may become a problem as well,  the idea of generating and shipping the proxies for them does seem to be something you shouldn't have to do but at the end of the day you want people to use your service so doing whatever it takes to help foster adoption (especially in the beginning) is probably worth it.

    Good luck and I hope this in some way helps.

    Wednesday, January 25, 2006 12:12 PM