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Moving to SQL Server 2005 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have some books on order so hopefully my immediate questions will be answered shortly without too much help from others here.

    I have lots of experience developing/using SQL Server 2000, so I thought taking up SQL Server 2005 wouldn't be too much of a mind shift. How wrong could I be?

    My initial experience of SQL Server 2005 is not particularly positive because I seem to be struggling to get off first base. I had expected to see an updated copy of the Enterprise Manager that I was familiar with in SQL Server 2000, but no such thing seems to exist for SQL Server 2005 on my development PC (or at least, I can't find it if it is there).

    I have installed betas of Visual Studio 2005 and SQL Server 2005. I managed to knock together a quick project in VS2005 which (apparently) connects okay to my local SQL Server instance. But after that I'm a bit stuck.

    What I was expecting/hoping to see was an Enterprise Manager style application where databases were accessed and configured via a collapsible tree. No such luck. I'm probably missing something obvious.

    I have access to two applications on my Programs menu - SQL Configuration Manager and also SQL Server Surface Area Configuration. These seem to be what I might reasonably expect from reading the help documentation. But I can't see any Enterprise Manager type of user interface.

    Am I looking in the right place? What I want to do is create a simple database with a couple of tables. From there I think I should be able to get going. I have been trained on .NET version 1, and the version 2 interface looks broadly familiar so I'm not really stuck with the .NET version 2 interface - I'm just missing the bit relating to setting up and configuring a SQL Server 2005 database.

    Help?
    Friday, September 16, 2005 10:27 AM

Answers

  • You have a couple of options.  The simplest is to bring up SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) -- which is the replacement for Enterprise Manager.  It should be right there on the menu for you to access.  In there, you will find the list of attached databases which will allow you to do exactly what you're looking for. 

    If you are using SQL Server Express (SSE), you will *not* get SSMS as it ships with Visual Studio.  There is a separate download for it.  But, your note above says that you installed SQL Server (not SSE).

    Alternatively, if you have Visual Studio, you can bring up Server/Database Explorer and connect the database of choice (or create one).  From there, you can create your tables and be on with it.

    Lance
    Monday, September 19, 2005 4:59 PM

All replies

  • You have a couple of options.  The simplest is to bring up SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) -- which is the replacement for Enterprise Manager.  It should be right there on the menu for you to access.  In there, you will find the list of attached databases which will allow you to do exactly what you're looking for. 

    If you are using SQL Server Express (SSE), you will *not* get SSMS as it ships with Visual Studio.  There is a separate download for it.  But, your note above says that you installed SQL Server (not SSE).

    Alternatively, if you have Visual Studio, you can bring up Server/Database Explorer and connect the database of choice (or create one).  From there, you can create your tables and be on with it.

    Lance
    Monday, September 19, 2005 4:59 PM
  • Well i found enterprise manager for SQL Server 2005 from Microsoft Sites. I forgot the address, but this module is a part of Microsoft Operation Manager 2005. I've found problem on it. So is there any other enterprise manager other SSE Manager (CTP) or this i found as a part of MOM module ?
    Wednesday, December 28, 2005 7:33 AM
  • Hi!

    What edition of MS SQL Server 2005 are you using. I guess you using the free Express version which is a "light" version of MS SQL Server. If you planning to use MS SQL Server 2005 a lot in you development-projects I can recommend you to buy the Developer edition of MS SQL Server 2005 which is a full version of the server. (As a developer you most have it all! :-) ) The develper edition is almost for free! There you have the SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) as LanceDelano mentioned in an earlier post. SSMS have the same appearens as Enterprise Manager in previous versions of MS SQL Server.

    Niklas

    Thursday, December 29, 2005 2:00 PM