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Azure File Storage RRS feed

  • Question

  • I’m trying to migrate a customer’s on-prem Win server into Azure. Part of that is a file server and part is AD/GPO. I know there is a new service for fully managed Active Directory and Group Policy functions in Azure (Preview) which we are looking at. I was curious if Azure File Storage (https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-file-storage-now-generally-available/) could be used to replace file shares on a server? I.e. a shared T drive which is used by many people to access and store files via just regular mapped network drives. Does that make sense?

    Tuesday, December 15, 2015 2:57 PM

Answers

  • Yes and No, you could use the Azure file service as a file share, however; it is not the same as your file server. You won't be authenticating with your AD credentials and Kerberos certificates behind the scenes. You authenticate with your azure storage key and everyone has full access to the files.

    With this in mind I don't think it is the solution you are looking for.

    At this time the best solution to host AD and Group Policy Objects in Azure is to run a Windows Server as an IaaS VM. The same with your file server. Your data drive could also be hosted on several VHDs to give faster access to the data. You get 500 IOPS per drive.

    So, today you need to use IaaS VMs in Azure to move your traditional infrastructure to Azure.

    Cheers,

    Brian

    Brian Lewis | IT Pro Evangelist | Microsoft Corporation | Blog: MyThoughtsOnIT.com 

    Tuesday, December 15, 2015 11:14 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Yes Azure Files would be a good replacement for on premises shared drives. You will need to consider that download and upload speeds are unlikely to be the same if the current file server is on the same network as the client devices.

    Donovan

    Tuesday, December 15, 2015 11:00 PM
  • Yes and No, you could use the Azure file service as a file share, however; it is not the same as your file server. You won't be authenticating with your AD credentials and Kerberos certificates behind the scenes. You authenticate with your azure storage key and everyone has full access to the files.

    With this in mind I don't think it is the solution you are looking for.

    At this time the best solution to host AD and Group Policy Objects in Azure is to run a Windows Server as an IaaS VM. The same with your file server. Your data drive could also be hosted on several VHDs to give faster access to the data. You get 500 IOPS per drive.

    So, today you need to use IaaS VMs in Azure to move your traditional infrastructure to Azure.

    Cheers,

    Brian

    Brian Lewis | IT Pro Evangelist | Microsoft Corporation | Blog: MyThoughtsOnIT.com 

    Tuesday, December 15, 2015 11:14 PM