none
Which NET Framework RRS feed

  • Question

  • My control panel shows I have NET Framework 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5. I have running XP/SP3. Why do I need so many. I have an update for 1.1 that won't load.

    Thanks

    Thursday, October 13, 2011 10:04 PM

Answers

  • The reason you need so many is that most of those  use a different CLR.

    .NET Framework 1.1 uses CLR 1.1

    .NET Framework 2.0-3.5 use CLR 2.0

    .NET Framework 4.0 uses CLR 4.0

    So, if you have a program written for a specific .NET framework, you need to have that framework (or a framework that has that same CLR at minimum) in order to run it.  The .NET frameworks aren't cummulative, meaning .NET framework 4.0 for example doesn't include .NET 3.5 or 1.1, you have to install those separately.

    AS far as having an update for 1.1 that won't install, you can probably do some searching on the internet and use some of the framework analysis tools to find out if you have a corrupted install.  But really, so few programs use .NET framework 1.1 anymore you probably don't even have to worry about it.  Most any program you use will not even need to access the .NET framework 1.1 libraries.


    Tom Overton
    • Proposed as answer by pvdg42 Friday, October 14, 2011 1:26 PM
    • Marked as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 17, 2011 7:26 AM
    Thursday, October 13, 2011 11:03 PM
  • Tom has given you excellent advice.

    You should understand that you have only two (2) frameworks installed.

    1.1 is a full framework.

    2.0/3.0/3.5 are all one (1) framework. 2.0 is the base, full, framework. 3.0 and 3.5 are extensions to 2.0 and cannot exist on your system unless 2.0 is installed first.

    As .NET Frameworks provide a managed environment for software execution, I would caution you against attempting to remove any .NET Framework installed on your system. Any program(s) you have that require that .NET Framework will no longer work.

    I've seen many questions similar to yours here, and often the concern is recovering disc space. If that is a concern for you, please ask about *safe* ways to recover disc space on your system here:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_xp

    • Marked as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 17, 2011 7:26 AM
    Friday, October 14, 2011 1:26 PM

All replies

  • The reason you need so many is that most of those  use a different CLR.

    .NET Framework 1.1 uses CLR 1.1

    .NET Framework 2.0-3.5 use CLR 2.0

    .NET Framework 4.0 uses CLR 4.0

    So, if you have a program written for a specific .NET framework, you need to have that framework (or a framework that has that same CLR at minimum) in order to run it.  The .NET frameworks aren't cummulative, meaning .NET framework 4.0 for example doesn't include .NET 3.5 or 1.1, you have to install those separately.

    AS far as having an update for 1.1 that won't install, you can probably do some searching on the internet and use some of the framework analysis tools to find out if you have a corrupted install.  But really, so few programs use .NET framework 1.1 anymore you probably don't even have to worry about it.  Most any program you use will not even need to access the .NET framework 1.1 libraries.


    Tom Overton
    • Proposed as answer by pvdg42 Friday, October 14, 2011 1:26 PM
    • Marked as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 17, 2011 7:26 AM
    Thursday, October 13, 2011 11:03 PM
  • Tom has given you excellent advice.

    You should understand that you have only two (2) frameworks installed.

    1.1 is a full framework.

    2.0/3.0/3.5 are all one (1) framework. 2.0 is the base, full, framework. 3.0 and 3.5 are extensions to 2.0 and cannot exist on your system unless 2.0 is installed first.

    As .NET Frameworks provide a managed environment for software execution, I would caution you against attempting to remove any .NET Framework installed on your system. Any program(s) you have that require that .NET Framework will no longer work.

    I've seen many questions similar to yours here, and often the concern is recovering disc space. If that is a concern for you, please ask about *safe* ways to recover disc space on your system here:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_xp

    • Marked as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 17, 2011 7:26 AM
    Friday, October 14, 2011 1:26 PM