locked
Row height in Excel RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all.

    And one more question: which font metrics are used to determine the line height? As far as I see in MS Word the Type Ascender and Type Descender are used. In MS Excel WinAscent and WinDescent or something like that are used, but it seems that the line height depends not only on them, but on something else.

    Tuesday, August 26, 2014 1:28 PM

Answers

  • Hello trofim24,

    In contrast to column widths, row heights are specified directly in terms of point size with no extra computation needed. The default height is established by the defaultRowHeight attribute of the sheetFormatPr element (ISO/IEC 29500-1:2012 §18.3.1.81). If a row is given a custom height (i.e., resized by the user), it is stored in the ht attribute of the row element (§18.3.1.73), and is also specified in points.

    You might be thrown off here by the dyDescent attribute, which is basically describing the distance in pixels between the bottom of the cell’s typographical content and bottom of the cell itself. It’s slightly more complicated than that and is described in full in [MS-XLSX] §2.5.1. For the purpose of determining the height of the row itself, dyDescent does not play a role.

    Best regards,
    Matt Weber | Microsoft Open Specifications Team

    Friday, August 29, 2014 10:47 PM

All replies

  • Hello trofim24

    Thank you for contacting Microsoft support. A support engineer will be in touch to assist further.

    Regards.


    Tarun Chopra | Escalation Engineer | Open Specifications Support Team

    Tuesday, August 26, 2014 4:11 PM
  • Hello trofim24,

    In contrast to column widths, row heights are specified directly in terms of point size with no extra computation needed. The default height is established by the defaultRowHeight attribute of the sheetFormatPr element (ISO/IEC 29500-1:2012 §18.3.1.81). If a row is given a custom height (i.e., resized by the user), it is stored in the ht attribute of the row element (§18.3.1.73), and is also specified in points.

    You might be thrown off here by the dyDescent attribute, which is basically describing the distance in pixels between the bottom of the cell’s typographical content and bottom of the cell itself. It’s slightly more complicated than that and is described in full in [MS-XLSX] §2.5.1. For the purpose of determining the height of the row itself, dyDescent does not play a role.

    Best regards,
    Matt Weber | Microsoft Open Specifications Team

    Friday, August 29, 2014 10:47 PM