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Secure File downloads using less bandwidth RRS feed

  • Question

  •  

    Hi All,

     

    We have a file server (uses Network credentials).

    We do not want to store these credentials on any aspx page.

    Hence, we have created an intermediate page which can find out which file the user wants to download, do some validations, read the file from file server and return it in HttpResponse to the user.

     

    The problem , what we are facing here, is we are doing a download on the server (in the intermediate page) and then doing the same on User machine. This is bound to cause problems when the number of requests increases. Is there a way to redirect the user's request (after doing validations) to the secure file location (that uses network credentials)?

     

    Regards,

    Nishant

    Saturday, August 4, 2007 6:06 AM

Answers

  • From personal experience the delivery of content over the internet is fraught with issues around volume, bandwidth and user experience.

     

    I was part of team that built an initial system that delivered protected music & video files (max. 20 mb) using windows media player DRM technology, this used a post licence delivery paradigm so the encrypted files were on a publicly accessible SAN (storage area network) via a web server (IIS), i.e. the files were useless without a WMP licence, access to the file (url) was only provided by a secure e-commerce website. Because we were doing post licence delivery we were able to modify the licence attributes as required, such as licence acquisition url.

    The file url was partially secured by using a 'token' that was time & locale dependent.

    We were writing the file out to the response object in a similar manner. We had 8 servers in a web cluster providing the performance required - we did have to increase the timeouts for asp.net to cope with people who were trying to download music files on 56 K modems; the number of end users doing this was small and decreasing monthly.

     

    We also extended this system for film content (2 - 6 Gb); the major difference was the use of a CDN (content delivery network) provided by a third party, they were using the Bit Torrent protocol. The use of a CDN did require use to move to a pre licence delivery paradigm, this was required as we didn't want the end user to download the file and then find they couldn't get the licence - download times for 2 Gb is still over an hour using a PTP based solution.

     

     

    HTH

     

    Ollie Riches

     

    Monday, August 6, 2007 11:35 AM

All replies

  • What type of files are we talking about?

     

    Are the file user specific or general files that user are granted access to ?

     

    Ollie Riches

     

     

    Monday, August 6, 2007 10:57 AM
  • These files are DRM protected content - can be audio, video or text files. Basically, a user will get access to a file only if he buys it. Also, we have decided not to give the user a direct Url to download the file. Hence, we are using a temporary page - where we are downloading the file from file server and then putting it into Response object.

     

    Regards,

    Nishant

    Monday, August 6, 2007 11:01 AM
  • Are you doing pre or post licence delivery for the DRM'ed files?

     

    Ollie Riches

    Monday, August 6, 2007 11:04 AM
  • From personal experience the delivery of content over the internet is fraught with issues around volume, bandwidth and user experience.

     

    I was part of team that built an initial system that delivered protected music & video files (max. 20 mb) using windows media player DRM technology, this used a post licence delivery paradigm so the encrypted files were on a publicly accessible SAN (storage area network) via a web server (IIS), i.e. the files were useless without a WMP licence, access to the file (url) was only provided by a secure e-commerce website. Because we were doing post licence delivery we were able to modify the licence attributes as required, such as licence acquisition url.

    The file url was partially secured by using a 'token' that was time & locale dependent.

    We were writing the file out to the response object in a similar manner. We had 8 servers in a web cluster providing the performance required - we did have to increase the timeouts for asp.net to cope with people who were trying to download music files on 56 K modems; the number of end users doing this was small and decreasing monthly.

     

    We also extended this system for film content (2 - 6 Gb); the major difference was the use of a CDN (content delivery network) provided by a third party, they were using the Bit Torrent protocol. The use of a CDN did require use to move to a pre licence delivery paradigm, this was required as we didn't want the end user to download the file and then find they couldn't get the licence - download times for 2 Gb is still over an hour using a PTP based solution.

     

     

    HTH

     

    Ollie Riches

     

    Monday, August 6, 2007 11:35 AM