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A Good EW3 Book? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All. I have recently come across to EW (and ED) from adobe, and am very pleased with my decision. I have figured out or watched tutorials for most of the things I need in Web, but find there is a lot of the dynamic-based tools I am unable to use. I will shortly be building a site based on a database so am going to need to know my way around these areas.
    Has anyone read a good book (for 3, but 2 will do if they are as similar as I have heard) that will show me what I need? I know there are a lot out there, I am just hoping to narrow my choices with recommendations, if anyone has any. Thanks.
    Andy

    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 10:33 AM

Answers

  • To a large degree, this all depends upon what you need to learn. Are you familiar enough with Expression Web to forgo learning about it and focus instead on ASP.NET? If so, Clark's recommendations will suffice for you. Are you looking to spend time writing your own server-side code in C# or VB? If so, I would not choose my book (item 3 from Clark's post) because I explicitly don't focus on that. However, if you want to have functionality with a minimal amount of code and without having to learn how to program in C# or VB, my book would be a good choice. I give you all the code in both languages, but I also try to do as much as I can declaratively (without writing code) so that you can get results faster.

    If you need a book on Expression Web 3, I'd have to say that my book (Microsoft Expression Web 3 In Depth) is the best choice, realizing that I'm a bit biased. :) I did a lot of work reorganizing the book and changing some of the "bonus" content in reaction to reader comments, and I think readers will really like the new layout. We will also have a comprehensive online chapter dealing with some ASP.NET information in addition to the content inside the hard copy.

    If you would like to see a sample chapter, you can head over to my Network World Microsoft Subnet blog at http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/10560. There's a link there so that you can read chapter 3 (keep in mind that the web layout is nowhere near as attractive and useful as the book's new layout) and you can also register to win a free copy.

    Jim Cheshire
    Jimco Software and Books
    http://www.jimcosoftware.com
    http://www.jimcobooks.com

    Author of:
    Microsoft Expression Web 3 In Depth
    Special Edition Using Microsoft Expression Web 2
    The Microsoft Expression Web Developer's Guide to ASP.NET 3.5
    Special Edition Using Microsoft Expression Web
    • Marked as answer by Andy Bertaut Wednesday, September 30, 2009 7:35 PM
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 2:51 PM

All replies

  • For working with databases using the asp.net controls of EW:

    1. Sam's Teach Yourself ASP.NET 2.0 in 24 Hours by Scott Mitchell

    He has a later book on ASP.NET 3.5 but you want the 2.0 one as it walks you completely through the process of setting up a membership enabled database-driven website. Don't be put off by the fact that it isnt a book on Expression Web -- the fact is that the asp.net controls in  Expression web that you will be using for your database work are well demonstrated in use by the sample website Scott  shows you how to build. It also introduces you to SQL database which you will need, since the default database used  by the membership controls is SQL Express.

    2. "Murach's ASP.NET 3.5 web programming with VB2008".

    This is another indispensable book. It goes over all the  asp.net controls in detail, with actual code examples and explains how to use the controls.

    4. "The Microsoft Expression Web Developer's Guide to ASP.NET 3.5" by Jim Cheshire.

    This book provides a lot of good explanation for how things work. It gets into some areas like compilation and using different Providers that don't get discussed in other Expression Web books. I would buy it, and read it for those reasons. But for the down-and-dirty working with the controls and databases, refs. (1) and (2) are the ones.


    ClarkNK, A.K.A. HomePage Doctor
    HomePageDoctor.com -- Expression Web database tutorials
    Ownertrades.com -- Created with FP, Access, Bots and Wizards
    MyNumbersTracker.com -- Created with Expression, VWDExress, SQL Express, and ASP.NET.
    • Edited by ClarkNK Wednesday, September 30, 2009 11:48 AM corrected a book title
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 11:47 AM
  • Thanks for that, and the speedy responce. i will for sure check those books out and see what suits my needs.

    Andy
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 11:53 AM
  • To a large degree, this all depends upon what you need to learn. Are you familiar enough with Expression Web to forgo learning about it and focus instead on ASP.NET? If so, Clark's recommendations will suffice for you. Are you looking to spend time writing your own server-side code in C# or VB? If so, I would not choose my book (item 3 from Clark's post) because I explicitly don't focus on that. However, if you want to have functionality with a minimal amount of code and without having to learn how to program in C# or VB, my book would be a good choice. I give you all the code in both languages, but I also try to do as much as I can declaratively (without writing code) so that you can get results faster.

    If you need a book on Expression Web 3, I'd have to say that my book (Microsoft Expression Web 3 In Depth) is the best choice, realizing that I'm a bit biased. :) I did a lot of work reorganizing the book and changing some of the "bonus" content in reaction to reader comments, and I think readers will really like the new layout. We will also have a comprehensive online chapter dealing with some ASP.NET information in addition to the content inside the hard copy.

    If you would like to see a sample chapter, you can head over to my Network World Microsoft Subnet blog at http://www.networkworld.com/community/blog/10560. There's a link there so that you can read chapter 3 (keep in mind that the web layout is nowhere near as attractive and useful as the book's new layout) and you can also register to win a free copy.

    Jim Cheshire
    Jimco Software and Books
    http://www.jimcosoftware.com
    http://www.jimcobooks.com

    Author of:
    Microsoft Expression Web 3 In Depth
    Special Edition Using Microsoft Expression Web 2
    The Microsoft Expression Web Developer's Guide to ASP.NET 3.5
    Special Edition Using Microsoft Expression Web
    • Marked as answer by Andy Bertaut Wednesday, September 30, 2009 7:35 PM
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 2:51 PM
  • Hey Folks,

    Any recommendations for a Java Script book for someone who at this point is doing good to spell JABA Skrit.  LOL.
    seriously I am working through the W3schools  JS tutorial (again) looking for something to supplement or perhaps present a different apporach

    MIke
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe." -- Albert Einstein
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 3:55 PM
  • There's a new 'JavaScript From Scratch' book from Sitepoint which may fit the bill.

    http://www.sitepoint.com/books/javascript1/



    Ian
    MS MVP Expression

    http://www.ew-resource.co.uk
    http://www.fp-resource.co.uk


    Ian Haynes
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 4:05 PM
  • Actually I like the video based training at http://lynda.com use the free trial or there is a discount code at http://by-expression.com/blogs/by-expression/archive/2009/09/30/training.aspx
    MS MVP Expression Tutorials & Help http://by-expression.com and online instructor led Expression Classes
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 4:21 PM
  • For JavaScript the way I would approach it:
    1) Read up at W3schools.com to get a base understanding of the laguage
    2) Select a framework to work in - personally I like jQuery
    3) Read the starting tutorials on the framework
    4) Work with the framework to handle what you need
    5) Use Google and the frameworks site for additional help

    This will fast track you to making and using JS on a professional level.
    --
    Chris Hanscom - Microsoft MVP
    On Facebook | On Twitter | Resource Center | Veign's Blog | Web Development Help

    Get a Complete Website Analysis by Veign
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 4:42 PM
  • I agree fully with Cheryl's recommendation of Lynda.com. I have been using them continuously for about 10 months now, and you definitely receive value for your money. Their JavaScript Essentials course sounds like it's right down your alley, Mike, and at $25 for a month's training (or $37.50 including the optional exercise files), it's a deal.

    On another note, for those who, like me, appreciate the clarity and style of the SitePoint books, note that today, 30 Sept. 2009, is the last day of a five-for-one sale on the pdf versions of their books (which are normally $29.95 ea, and still are if you use the standard order pages instead going through the sale page). These books range from design, to ASP.NET, to online marketing, to PHP, and yes, Mike, also javascript. Many also offer 4-chapter downloadable samples, although as late in the sale as it is you may not have time for more than a cursory examination.

    If you're the sort who doesn't mind reading from the screen (or printing your own documents), or in fact prefers it when working through training (and who enjoys having the searchability of electronic texts for training), today's the last day to pick up a fairly nice library of training books for a reasonable price, five for $29.95. Here's the link: http://sale.sitepoint.com/

    cheers,
    scott
    Plural's don't have apostrophe's. It seem's sometime's that any word's ending in "s" get a gratuitous apostrophe. Apostrophe's are used to indicate possessive's and elision's (contraction's or abbreviation's).
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 4:46 PM
  • Hi Jim thankls for the reply. I really am not sure which way to go just yet. I feel pretty confident in most of EW, having been pretty good at Dreamweaver and applying some common sense, but the asp.net controls are the parts I don't get. That said, I think I'd be better off with a book that tackles the nuts and bolts of the application itself, as your does, beore moving on to asp.net specifically. That way I won't miss anything.
    I'll keep you posted :-)

    Thanks all.
    Wednesday, September 30, 2009 7:35 PM