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Capturing Driver Design RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all

    How do we write a High level Design for a Device Driver ?

    any suggestions or comments.

    is it ok if i capture, various scenarios in an activity diagram, say what happens when the user plugin the device, Removes the Device, what happens when the Hardware interrupts,  what happens when an IO request is sent to the hardware etc...

    or is there a specific standard or protocol to be followed,does Microsoft set some guidlines to be used for Design etc...

    regards

    Rekha

    Saturday, December 8, 2012 6:22 PM

Answers

  • Step back and read up on writing device drivers.  Drivers are in Windows (and in general) a plugin service for the operating system and are highly constrained.  For example using KMDF you basically define and register a bunch of callbacks for everything from adding a device, to interrupt service to handling a request from user space.   Drivers in general are highly constrained on their structure and design.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr

    Saturday, December 8, 2012 6:30 PM

All replies

  • Step back and read up on writing device drivers.  Drivers are in Windows (and in general) a plugin service for the operating system and are highly constrained.  For example using KMDF you basically define and register a bunch of callbacks for everything from adding a device, to interrupt service to handling a request from user space.   Drivers in general are highly constrained on their structure and design.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr

    Saturday, December 8, 2012 6:30 PM
  • We don't have specific guidelines on how you write your documentation. Typical design guidelines would include the Io interface, ie the ioctls and other irps you support, as well as security considerations (buffer validation,acls, etc)

    d -- This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Saturday, December 8, 2012 7:20 PM