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Design Pattern RRS feed

  • Question

  • Which design pattern you prefer for large scale software development?
    Thanks
    Md. Marufuzzaman
    Don't forget to click [Vote] / [Good Answer] on the post(s) that helped you.
    I will not say I have failed 1000 times; I will say that I have discovered 1000 ways that can cause failure – Thomas Edison.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 2:51 PM

Answers

All replies

  • What type of pattern do you seek?  There are multiple categories of patters, not to mention that you can implement more than one patter within an application.

    Please refer to the wiki article for a list of some common design patterns: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_pattern_%28computer_science%29


    Also, how is this a question about C#? The question might be better answered in another forum: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/architecturegeneral/threads
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 2:55 PM
  • Hi John:
    Thanks for prompt response.... :).
    What do you think about factory pattern? But I want to know which is most popular & why?
    Thanks
    Md. Marufuzzaman
    Don't forget to click [Vote] / [Good Answer] on the post(s) that helped you.
    I will not say I have failed 1000 times; I will say that I have discovered 1000 ways that can cause failure – Thomas Edison.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 3:18 PM
  • Software design does not use just one design pattern. It is constructed from many design patterns put together as a result of experience.

           -Steve


    Programming blog: http://nitoprograms.blogspot.com/
      Including my TCP/IP .NET Sockets FAQ

    Microsoft Certified Professional Developer
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 3:22 PM
  • Hi Steve:
    Could you please give me some useful resource / references so that i can study more on it.
    Thanks
    Md. Marufuzzaman
    Don't forget to click [Vote] / [Good Answer] on the post(s) that helped you.
    I will not say I have failed 1000 times; I will say that I have discovered 1000 ways that can cause failure – Thomas Edison.
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 3:36 PM
  • Hi Md. Marufuzzaman ,

    Please change thread type to discussion as the question is generic and asking about opinions.




    Thanks,
    A.m.a.L
    Dot Net Goodies
    Don't hate the hacker, hate the code
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 3:41 PM
  • The classic resource for design patterns is the GoF book.

           -Steve
    Programming blog: http://nitoprograms.blogspot.com/
      Including my TCP/IP .NET Sockets FAQ

    Microsoft Certified Professional Developer
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 3:47 PM
  • If you read the original GoF and it seems a bit too "sophisticated" for you, try something like "Head First Design Patterns" first.


    John Grove - TFD Group, Senior Software Engineer, EI Division, http://www.tfdg.com
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 4:25 PM
  • And remember, don't code for patterns. Simply let them emerge.

    In other words : Don't use patterns because you want to. Use them when you (or system) need to.
    Jay Joshi
    Tuesday, February 2, 2010 11:58 PM
  • Well, there's some truth in that statement; after all, design patterns are really just "lessons learned" from the experts.

    However, I find that thumbing through a design patterns book now and again is helpful for me. I tend to naturally gravitate towards some and away from others, and it's good to be reminded of less commonly-used patterns. Also, the common pitfalls sections are good reminders, even on the patterns I use more commonly.

           -Steve
    Programming blog: http://nitoprograms.blogspot.com/
      Including my TCP/IP .NET Sockets FAQ

    Microsoft Certified Professional Developer
    Wednesday, February 3, 2010 1:42 AM