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Storage Tiers difference RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi guys,

    I am new to azure and would like to know the difference between standard and premium storage in a real scenario, not something that I can find on internet. I mean by this when to use it in real life.


    Sunday, January 13, 2019 10:52 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    That what you will find on internet will give you good understanding about the difference between these 2, but let me try to explain:

    STANDARD

    Standard storage is what most applications will use and it's cheaper and a bit slower. You pay for what you consume. If you have 1 TB VHD and if you have only 100 MB data on it you will pay only for those 100 MB not for the whole size. It is not the disk size what it counts it is the data you have on it (Standard disk cost per transacation and per GB). Standard storage performance tier allows you to store Tables, Queues, Files, Blobs and Azure virtual machine disks.

    PREMIUM

    Premium disk aren't charged by transaction. It's more of a flat fee model. Premium storage is based on SSD storage as opposed to hard drive storage we have in standard tier. You have to do some calculus on one hand keeping costs in mind, and in the other hand your need for IOPS, input output operations per second. How fast do you need the storage subsystem to be for your IaaS VM workloads? If they're just doing relatively low horsepower tasks, maybe serving DNS or maybe some light IIS web, you may be fine with standard storage. By contrast, if you're doing a lot of random IO and you're hosting, say, IaaS based SQL servers or MySQL database servers, then you may want to look at premium for them. Here we get charged for the disk size and not data written. Premium storage performance tier only supports Azure virtual machine disks.

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    • Marked as answer by Marc_M1 Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:38 AM
    Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:07 AM
  • No need for SSD for domain controllers. Standard storage is when you've got more than one VM doing the same job. You could have two domain controllers on standard storage in an availability set. Then you're getting a great SLA, and they're going to work quite well or multiple webservers. So domain controllers are good. Maybe remote desktop brokers, not very busy. Some web servers. But standard storage just does not cut it when you've got disk-intensive applications. So busy file servers with many, many users are not going to work quite well. SQL databases outside of dev and test just really won't work well without performance, without premium disks. SharePoint servers, forget about it. They're just really going to need premium disk. And of course, remote desktop session hosts many, many users accessing a single operating system with multiple read and writes to a disk are definitely going to need premium storage. So application and database workloads really do need that premium storage.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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    • Edited by NM[] Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:35 AM
    • Marked as answer by Marc_M1 Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:37 AM
    Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:29 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    That what you will find on internet will give you good understanding about the difference between these 2, but let me try to explain:

    STANDARD

    Standard storage is what most applications will use and it's cheaper and a bit slower. You pay for what you consume. If you have 1 TB VHD and if you have only 100 MB data on it you will pay only for those 100 MB not for the whole size. It is not the disk size what it counts it is the data you have on it (Standard disk cost per transacation and per GB). Standard storage performance tier allows you to store Tables, Queues, Files, Blobs and Azure virtual machine disks.

    PREMIUM

    Premium disk aren't charged by transaction. It's more of a flat fee model. Premium storage is based on SSD storage as opposed to hard drive storage we have in standard tier. You have to do some calculus on one hand keeping costs in mind, and in the other hand your need for IOPS, input output operations per second. How fast do you need the storage subsystem to be for your IaaS VM workloads? If they're just doing relatively low horsepower tasks, maybe serving DNS or maybe some light IIS web, you may be fine with standard storage. By contrast, if you're doing a lot of random IO and you're hosting, say, IaaS based SQL servers or MySQL database servers, then you may want to look at premium for them. Here we get charged for the disk size and not data written. Premium storage performance tier only supports Azure virtual machine disks.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you found this post helpful, please give it a "Helpful" vote. 
    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.

    • Marked as answer by Marc_M1 Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:38 AM
    Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:07 AM
  • Hi NM,

    Thank you so much for fast reply. Except for SQL shall we use ssd for something else, DC, rds or what servers or roles need premium. I think that premium costs a lot so I don't want to use it if I don't need.

    Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:20 AM
  • No need for SSD for domain controllers. Standard storage is when you've got more than one VM doing the same job. You could have two domain controllers on standard storage in an availability set. Then you're getting a great SLA, and they're going to work quite well or multiple webservers. So domain controllers are good. Maybe remote desktop brokers, not very busy. Some web servers. But standard storage just does not cut it when you've got disk-intensive applications. So busy file servers with many, many users are not going to work quite well. SQL databases outside of dev and test just really won't work well without performance, without premium disks. SharePoint servers, forget about it. They're just really going to need premium disk. And of course, remote desktop session hosts many, many users accessing a single operating system with multiple read and writes to a disk are definitely going to need premium storage. So application and database workloads really do need that premium storage.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you found this post helpful, please give it a "Helpful" vote. 
    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.



    • Edited by NM[] Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:35 AM
    • Marked as answer by Marc_M1 Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:37 AM
    Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:29 AM
  • Thank you so much. This is exactly what I need.
    Sunday, January 13, 2019 11:37 AM