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Auction website: in Orchard CMS or Umbraco CMS? RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-524808007 posted

    Hi all, not sure if it's the right place for this question, but since I'm just 'Getting Started' on the whole ASP.net/C# programming adventure - busy exploring all the tutorials I can find - I thought I'd post my question here. Alright.

    After I'm done playing with tutorials, I'm meaning to start a real project: an auction website. Just to see what I'm made of. :-) I would like to create it in either Orchard or Umbraco CMS, because the content is way easier to manage with a CMS behind the site. I know a fair bit about the flexibility of Umbraco CMS, but do not know Orchard very well, just yet.

    I'd like a word of advice. If you were creating an Auction website project, which CMS would you choose, and why? 
    Or doesn't matter, really? Or would you pick an entirely different CMS for such a project?

    Sunday, January 27, 2013 7:06 AM

Answers

  • User281315223 posted

    I am a bit partial to Orchard and I don't have a ton of experience with Umbraco.

    That being said, you should choose whichever technology that "you" are more comfortable with to tackle a problem like this. All CMSs will have similar features and basic functionality. I'm a huge fan of Orchard because of the ease of working with custom types, the usage of the Razor View Engine and the fact that it is built around an MVC-type architecture / pattern.

    You could easily make a custom Content Type to house and display your items and through the use of Orchard's Projections you could display them without too much effort.

    Although, you really shouldn't limit yourself to just Content Management Systems. You could easily construct your own interface to manage your items through a traditional C# or .Net application, which you might find would give you more flexibility if you wanted this to be a "serious" application.

    If this is just being done as a learning exercise, then perhaps give all of them a shot. Try doing it in Orchard, Umbraco and ASP.Net. You would gain some valuable experience working with each of the technologies, learning their strengths and weaknesses and at the end if you wanted to make a "real" auction site, you would know which technology suits you best.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Sunday, January 27, 2013 8:28 AM

All replies

  • User281315223 posted

    I am a bit partial to Orchard and I don't have a ton of experience with Umbraco.

    That being said, you should choose whichever technology that "you" are more comfortable with to tackle a problem like this. All CMSs will have similar features and basic functionality. I'm a huge fan of Orchard because of the ease of working with custom types, the usage of the Razor View Engine and the fact that it is built around an MVC-type architecture / pattern.

    You could easily make a custom Content Type to house and display your items and through the use of Orchard's Projections you could display them without too much effort.

    Although, you really shouldn't limit yourself to just Content Management Systems. You could easily construct your own interface to manage your items through a traditional C# or .Net application, which you might find would give you more flexibility if you wanted this to be a "serious" application.

    If this is just being done as a learning exercise, then perhaps give all of them a shot. Try doing it in Orchard, Umbraco and ASP.Net. You would gain some valuable experience working with each of the technologies, learning their strengths and weaknesses and at the end if you wanted to make a "real" auction site, you would know which technology suits you best.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Sunday, January 27, 2013 8:28 AM
  • User-524808007 posted

    Thanks Rion for your kind answer. I think I will try them all as you say, see what the best fit is for me (in the end). I'll start in ASP.Net/C#, to get a good grip on the programming language. :-)

    Monday, January 28, 2013 12:42 PM