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How to Close An Application Launched from Metro UI ?

    Question

  • Hey Folks

    Any idea how to close an application started from Metro UI. I Started Weather Application and now i want to close it, switched to Desktop , Started Task manager & i can see the Weather Application Still Running, also some times the task manager says an application is suspended & i have to kill it.

    Regards

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 6:16 PM

Answers

  • Windows will suspend a metro app when leave it. It keeps it in memory but it doesn't use any CPU time. This allows you to jump right back into the app if needed. Works kinda like a smartphone. If the system needs more memory it will close the oldest apps. 
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 7:00 PM

All replies

  • Yes, please..... I want to know it too.
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 6:51 PM
  • Windows will suspend a metro app when leave it. It keeps it in memory but it doesn't use any CPU time. This allows you to jump right back into the app if needed. Works kinda like a smartphone. If the system needs more memory it will close the oldest apps. 
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 7:00 PM
  • I loaded Win8 x64 on my Non-Touch Laptop today. While it is great, the problem is that pressing the win+d or Win Button (or something similar) always seem to take you back to the last running Metro App, so for example if I opened the weather app or whatever it will take me back to it. But I don't want to go back to the weather app again so an ability to easily close it would be great so that I don't have to shuffle through the apps to get to the right one.

    I had to go to classic desktop and use task manager to kill the suspended app. Not very nice. I may have not explained it well but I don't have the laptop at hand at the moment. It could be more irritating cos it is a classic PC though. However, the ability to easily close an app would be great since there are some apps that are only needed for a very short while ... please Microsoft don't adopt the same method as Apple/Android ... allow the user to easily kill the app. After all we want to keep the memory for more often used apps.

     

     

     

     

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 8:08 PM
  • Windows will suspend a metro app when leave it. It keeps it in memory but it doesn't use any CPU time. This allows you to jump right back into the app if needed. Works kinda like a smartphone. If the system needs more memory it will close the oldest apps. 

    I'd also like to know how to close an app launched through Metro. Even though it's suspended, I still want to be able to close it so I don't have to flip through every app I've opened to get to what I want. At this point I used the task man to kill the app.  Disappointing response imo.  This may be the intended behavior, but there needs to be a way to close the app if you want to.  Maybe I'm just missing something.
    • Edited by psychovoid Wednesday, September 14, 2011 11:10 PM
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 11:10 PM
  • This allows you to jump right back into the app if needed. Works kinda like a smartphone. 

    This is precisely the problem. Microsoft have taken it upon themselves to decide for the user how they should use the system without considering freedom of choice.

    Scenario with Metro: User wants to "glance" at a social networking app for a few moments but then decides to use a number of productivity apps for work but needs to quickly jump from one app to another. Because they couldn't close the app (without using the legacy task manager) the user mistakenly opens the casual app which has led to them procrastinating. -- If apps could be closed they would have switched from app to app fluidly without seeing the social networking app they only meant to glance at for a few moments.

    When in an app you should be able to right click with an option to close or hide (suspend/freeze).


    • Edited by ahdr Wednesday, September 14, 2011 11:51 PM
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 11:49 PM
  • My current half-baked solution is to press Alt + F4 to sort of close the metro app. It will leave you behind a metro background, but you can switch over to the Desktop afterward by press Alt + Tab
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 4:46 AM
  • Yes Alt+F4 does work to close (not suspend) the metro app that is currently running. Then either Alt+Tab or left click anywhere on the screen to get back to the metro start screen. On a side note (not sure if it's been stated yet) to see any metro apps that are suspended just hold your mouse arrow on the left edge of the screen and then click the image to go to it. Then you can Alt+F4 out of it.
    • Edited by Kris Crowder Thursday, September 15, 2011 12:17 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 12:17 PM
  • I see several big problems with the application switching mechanism (swipe from left):

    1. There's no way to close an app. I don't want to have to switch through a bunch of apps to get to the app that I want. I should be able to close an app if I don't need it.
    2. Even if I want to be running a bunch of apps, I still should not need to cycle through them to get to the app that I want. It's much faster, easier and more intuitive to jump straight to the app that I want to switch to. Suggestion: something like holding down the Windows button should give me an alt-tab-like view where I can switch straight to the app that I want. Or it could give me a Mango/WebOS-like view (very large thumbnails) where I can scroll through apps.
    3. I'm noticing that as I switch between applications via the swipe mechanism, each application is getting unsuspended and then later suspended again. That can't be good for performance or battery life. It would be great to have a way to switch to a target app without unsuspending totally unrelated apps. Again, the Mango/WebOS app switching mechanism could work for this.

    Thank you for listening.

     

    Thursday, September 15, 2011 2:40 PM
  • I think the Suspend method should not be used across the board on default. I think the default implementation should be quitting, and by analyzing applications that are always used, the system can implement Suspend on these apps (e.g. browser). Also, Windows should give us the option to prevent Suspend on individual apps. After all, Windows is all about the freedom and power of the user, not like some silly MacOS implementation.

    Thursday, September 15, 2011 3:21 PM
  • I see several big problems with the application switching mechanism (swipe from left):

    1. There's no way to close an app. I don't want to have to switch through a bunch of apps to get to the app that I want. I should be able to close an app if I don't need it.
    2. Even if I want to be running a bunch of apps, I still should not need to cycle through them to get to the app that I want. It's much faster, easier and more intuitive to jump straight to the app that I want to switch to. Suggestion: something like holding down the Windows button should give me an alt-tab-like view where I can switch straight to the app that I want. Or it could give me a Mango/WebOS-like view (very large thumbnails) where I can scroll through apps.
    3. I'm noticing that as I switch between applications via the swipe mechanism, each application is getting unsuspended and then later suspended again. That can't be good for performance or battery life. It would be great to have a way to switch to a target app without unsuspending totally unrelated apps. Again, the Mango/WebOS app switching mechanism could work for this.

    Thank you for listening.

     

    I have to agree with mamyun.  I was immediately frustrated that there was no easy way to see what Metro apps were running or switch between them, or close them.

    And do I understand correctly that Metro apps gets suspended when you switch to a different one?  This can't be right, can it?  What if in the future I have some great app like Adobe Lightroom and want to process 1,000 photos so I start that process and want to do something else while that's running?  If it gets suspended it will never finish unless I leave it in the foreground and don't use the computer to do anything else?  Doesn't that defeat the purpose of multitasking?

    Also, I installed the developer preview on a HP 8460p laptop.  (No touchscreen, just keyboard and mouse.)  When I press ALT+F4, the Metro app I have running does NOT close.  I had to pull up Task Manager and highlight the app (Treehouse) and click "End Task", but the problem then was all the other Metro apps disappeared when I pressed Windows Key+Tab to switch to a different one.


    • Edited by KHHemmelman Thursday, September 15, 2011 3:51 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 3:46 PM
  • I don't like this behavior as well. I started some of the preinstalled games and I could get rid of their music playing on background, because there was no option to close them. Really annoying.

    Imagine yourself watching some porn when suddenly someone comes to the room and you hurry to close the browser to mute the sounds of passion.  :-D

    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:25 PM
  • Applications can request to continue processing in the background when they are "suspended", but this of course now leaves it up to the app to implement that functionality, taking control away from the user. A major problem IMHO.
    Moderator | MCTS .NET 2.0 Web Applications | My Blog: http://www.commongenius.com
    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:51 PM
  • this is some wat similar to the UI i have seen on Blackberry tab ... let me tell u wen u launch a app and go to other after a few time the 1 st app which u launched and is not working upon becomes suspended, and still further if that app is not used that app kills automatically.

    yes some times its frustrating to switch between app becoz those apps come in way that u wanted to close so there is a solution for that go to start menu control panel then to privacy and make app history to desired no. that is the no. of app u wna shuffle  1by 1 so app will switch nw in accordance to which app u opened lately .....

    uptill now i found none bug in windows but certainly in some app which r nt Microsofts part so choose good app to enjy the bliss

    thnx

    Sunday, September 18, 2011 7:13 PM
  • This is undesired behavior. There should be a close button as well as a keyboard shortcut (Alt-F4) to close Metro apps.
    Monday, September 19, 2011 4:48 PM
  • When the first PCs came out there was something known as "Control Red". It was the off switch which was colored red.  I have had apps in my smart phone keep playing sounds after they have been closed.  The only way I got it to stop was to pull the battery.  This is a very bad idea not to completely remove apps when they are closed.
    Sunday, October 02, 2011 6:00 AM
  • I agree with the consensus here, Alt+F4 isn't enough. There needs to be a simple mechanism (likely right-click) to close a Metro app. The main hook of Windows 8 is to be slick and intuitive, and there's nothing intuitive about the current way to close metro apps.

    That said, let me say that I love everything else about this preview.

    Thursday, October 06, 2011 3:55 AM
  • I said this on another thread, but I think if you mouse-over the top right it should show the x, which should force an app to suspend AND more importantly remove it from the UI.  Computers these days have more than enough resources that Microsoft is probably right, suspend will work just as well if not better, but removing it from the UI is the issue because it gives more clutter to switch through.


    On a tablet, there should just be a close option when you swipe down from the top of the screen.

     

    The game sounds actually do stop when the games get suspended, it's just that going to the start menu isn't enough to suspend them (you have to switch to another app and then the sounds stop).  So with that being the case, suspend is good enough as far as I'm concerned.

    • Proposed as answer by Ydnorok Wednesday, November 02, 2011 3:17 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Ydnorok Wednesday, November 02, 2011 3:17 AM
    Thursday, October 06, 2011 4:07 AM
  • My app WILL have a close button.

    Javascript:   window.close();

    or                 document.parentWindow.close();

    If this works for you, please Propose As Answer.

    • Proposed as answer by Ydnorok Thursday, November 03, 2011 8:24 AM
    Wednesday, November 02, 2011 3:20 AM
  • Hello,

         I'm brand new to these threads, and basically joined because I, too became frustrated with the app-switching method in the Dev Preview.  I started a thread the other day that got one or two replies, but has been rather dead since.  I have searched through the forums, but have yet to find anything similar to my idea.  The thread has detailed descriptions, as well as pictures of what I am trying to describe as a much faster and more efficient way to switch apps in Metro.  I hope this is a better place to try to let people know about the thought haha.  Here's a link to the thread:

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsdeveloperpreviewgeneral/thread/6ac99fd8-b343-4db1-9f43-3618578c24e4/


         And if you'd rather glance at some pics before trying to read anything, here's a link to the pictures (with little descriptions) that I have uploaded onto the SkyDrive.  I'm no artist, but I think these can help:

    https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx?cid=91ec9bd4a15f85fa&page=play&resid=91EC9BD4A15F85FA!136&authkey=RcnUVVmAgic%24


         Let me know what you think!  If you think it looks reasonable, do you have any recommendations for who to send the idea to that might have some actual impact?  If Microsoft is trying to listen more to their consumers, then I would think there ought to be a designated place to suggest ideas.

    Thursday, November 03, 2011 8:12 AM
  • I think I have more of a philisophical reason behind not liking the current "no close" design concept. for me, it's about trust and privacy. If apps never close, there is always a chance ( and likely a very good one ) background apps are going to sit there and monotr and report things that I'd rather not share with them. I have read that Windows 8 is designed to never turn off... God, that's scary. Short of a pacemaker, I don't trust machines that never turn off and have apps that never close. I seen so many developers take such huge liberties with my privacy in the name of cash that I can't believe this is going to be any different on Windows 8; it's just now a lot harder for the end user to police. To me this design decision is very anti-user, but the flip side is that this is a very, very good profit generating decision by MS who will gather, sell and make a fortune from non personal aggragated data collection that is baked right into the OS. I'm sorry, but closing an application by clicking an X or swiping in some sort of pattern isn't an onerous task that should go away. It's more of an expression of choice; I would like to choose to control what is running, what stays running, and how and when things run. To take this away is to guarentee a burst of unsafe hacks that will restore this setting when the OS launches. turn it back on MS, turn it back on and demonstrate your understanding of user privacy, user choice and user tradition.


    slowly getting my mind around .NET...

    Monday, February 20, 2012 8:09 PM
  • I think I have more of a philisophical reason behind not liking the current "no close" design concept. for me, it's about trust and privacy. If apps never close, there is always a chance ( and likely a very good one ) background apps are going to sit there and monotr and report things that I'd rather not share with them. I have read that Windows 8 is designed to never turn off... God, that's scary. Short of a pacemaker, I don't trust machines that never turn off and have apps that never close. I seen so many developers take such huge liberties with my privacy in the name of cash that I can't believe this is going to be any different on Windows 8; it's just now a lot harder for the end user to police. To me this design decision is very anti-user, but the flip side is that this is a very, very good profit generating decision by MS who will gather, sell and make a fortune from non personal aggragated data collection that is baked right into the OS. I'm sorry, but closing an application by clicking an X or swiping in some sort of pattern isn't an onerous task that should go away. It's more of an expression of choice; I would like to choose to control what is running, what stays running, and how and when things run. To take this away is to guarentee a burst of unsafe hacks that will restore this setting when the OS launches. turn it back on MS, turn it back on and demonstrate your understanding of user privacy, user choice and user tradition.


    slowly getting my mind around .NET...


    My guess, they won't because it's impossible to monitor in the background. I don't know of Connected Standby, but I am guessing that it supports for limited operations only. Only my guessing here, doesn't mean it has something to do with reality.

    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Tuesday, February 21, 2012 3:24 PM
  • the consumer preview will have a gesture to close Metro-Apps:

    http://winunleaked.tk/2011/12/how-to-close-immersive-apps-just-nice-n-easy/


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Tuesday, February 21, 2012 6:59 PM