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Will we get MUI Packs for the Developer Preview?

    Question

  • Will be we get MUIs offered in Windows Update to test our first Metro Apps with our native language?
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 2:56 PM

Answers

  • For the Windows Developer Preview, non-English language packs will not be available. Windows language packs for certain other languages may be available in the Beta; look for information at that time.

    But note that you don't need to have the Windows display language in another language in order for you to develop your Metro-style app in another language: the two are completely independent. Just create your assets in whatever language you want; there's just one thing you want to make sure to do in your app: in the solution properties dialog in VS, specify what the language is.

    Specifying the language like that will allow Windows and the Windows Store to know what the language is. In the Store, this will allow people to see what language your app supports as they are browsing through apps in the Store. In Windows, it will allow any system-provided resources (e.g. a stock string in a message flyout) to match the language of your app. (At this time, those system-provided resources are included only for English, but at RTM those resources should be provided in around a hundred languages on every system, regardless of the Windows display language or what Windows language packs are installed.)

    If you want to create a Metro-style app for which you provide more than one localization, that's easier than ever to do. Using the resource infrastructure built into WinRT and the support built into VS, the AppX package will know all of the languages that your app is localized for. On the target system where it gets installed, the customer using that system can specify all the languages they use in the Language control panel. This is a preference list (analogous to the HTTP Accept-Language header). If your app is localized for multiple languages, the UI will display in the language that is the user's highest preference. If the user hasn't added any of your app's languages into their profile, then your app's default language (set in the solution properties) will be use to display the UI.

    A couple of examples:

    - Suppose you create a single-language app, in French only. Regardless of what languages are in the user's profile or which one they are using to display Windows UI, your app displays in French.

    -  Suppose you create an app that's localized for French and Spanish, with French as the default. If a customer gets your app and their profile includes only English, then your app will display in French (your app's default). If the customer's profile includes only Spanish, or has Spanish first followed by French, your app will display in Spanish.

    So, if you want to test out your localized Metro-style app and switch between the languages, then just change your language profile in the Language control panel and re-run your app.

     

    To learn about using the resource infrastructure, check out the //BUILD/ sessions on Friday afternoon by Kip Knox (APP-411T) and Tim Heuer (App-528C).

    • Marked as answer by Andre.Ziegler Friday, September 16, 2011 1:25 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 7:27 AM

All replies

  • For the Windows Developer Preview, non-English language packs will not be available. Windows language packs for certain other languages may be available in the Beta; look for information at that time.

    But note that you don't need to have the Windows display language in another language in order for you to develop your Metro-style app in another language: the two are completely independent. Just create your assets in whatever language you want; there's just one thing you want to make sure to do in your app: in the solution properties dialog in VS, specify what the language is.

    Specifying the language like that will allow Windows and the Windows Store to know what the language is. In the Store, this will allow people to see what language your app supports as they are browsing through apps in the Store. In Windows, it will allow any system-provided resources (e.g. a stock string in a message flyout) to match the language of your app. (At this time, those system-provided resources are included only for English, but at RTM those resources should be provided in around a hundred languages on every system, regardless of the Windows display language or what Windows language packs are installed.)

    If you want to create a Metro-style app for which you provide more than one localization, that's easier than ever to do. Using the resource infrastructure built into WinRT and the support built into VS, the AppX package will know all of the languages that your app is localized for. On the target system where it gets installed, the customer using that system can specify all the languages they use in the Language control panel. This is a preference list (analogous to the HTTP Accept-Language header). If your app is localized for multiple languages, the UI will display in the language that is the user's highest preference. If the user hasn't added any of your app's languages into their profile, then your app's default language (set in the solution properties) will be use to display the UI.

    A couple of examples:

    - Suppose you create a single-language app, in French only. Regardless of what languages are in the user's profile or which one they are using to display Windows UI, your app displays in French.

    -  Suppose you create an app that's localized for French and Spanish, with French as the default. If a customer gets your app and their profile includes only English, then your app will display in French (your app's default). If the customer's profile includes only Spanish, or has Spanish first followed by French, your app will display in Spanish.

    So, if you want to test out your localized Metro-style app and switch between the languages, then just change your language profile in the Language control panel and re-run your app.

     

    To learn about using the resource infrastructure, check out the //BUILD/ sessions on Friday afternoon by Kip Knox (APP-411T) and Tim Heuer (App-528C).

    • Marked as answer by Andre.Ziegler Friday, September 16, 2011 1:25 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 7:27 AM
  • thanks!
    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:25 PM
  • Without other language pack it is not possible to test the handwriting recognition, since the input panel icon is disabled within other language keyboard layouts. I am currently developing an app that uses the handwriting recognition but it seems that I have to wait until the Beta or final version because the English version does recognize German characters. That is a pity.

    Regards

    Ismet


    • Edited by Gulki Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:24 PM
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 9:20 PM