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if databases are responding slow how wil you trouble shoot them? RRS feed

Answers

  • If the database is slow responding to the first request, the client could be trying the wrong protocol (perhaps named pipes) and then waiting for a timeout, then trying the next protocol (perhaps TCP) and succeeding. So you are slow because of waiting for the timeout period.

    Can you be more specific about what you mean by slow? What part is slow? Is it slow under all conditions? Is it fast when connected to locally but slow for remote conditions? Is only one query slow, or one set of queries? Have you run SQL Profiler to identify specific procedures that are slow?


    Rick Byham, Microsoft, SQL Server Books Online, Implies no warranty

    • Proposed as answer by amber zhang Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:32 AM
    • Marked as answer by amber zhang Wednesday, August 1, 2012 1:54 AM
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 3:57 PM
  • Databases does not run slow. Databases don't run at all. Specific queries may run slow. Or all queries maybe slow, because someone has messed some configuration, or there is a background job taking up resources. Or there is a network issue.

    The first step is narrow down what is perceived as slow. Everything? Always? Some queries? Some times?

    But this is the security forum, so it is not really the correct venue for the question.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Proposed as answer by amber zhang Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:32 AM
    • Marked as answer by amber zhang Wednesday, August 1, 2012 1:54 AM
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 7:28 PM

All replies

  •  database are responding slowly reasons might be

    blockings

    missing indexes

    slow running queries,

    any resource bottle neck


    Ramesh Babu Vavilla MCTS,MSBI

    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 1:37 PM
  • If the database is slow responding to the first request, the client could be trying the wrong protocol (perhaps named pipes) and then waiting for a timeout, then trying the next protocol (perhaps TCP) and succeeding. So you are slow because of waiting for the timeout period.

    Can you be more specific about what you mean by slow? What part is slow? Is it slow under all conditions? Is it fast when connected to locally but slow for remote conditions? Is only one query slow, or one set of queries? Have you run SQL Profiler to identify specific procedures that are slow?


    Rick Byham, Microsoft, SQL Server Books Online, Implies no warranty

    • Proposed as answer by amber zhang Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:32 AM
    • Marked as answer by amber zhang Wednesday, August 1, 2012 1:54 AM
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 3:57 PM
  • Databases does not run slow. Databases don't run at all. Specific queries may run slow. Or all queries maybe slow, because someone has messed some configuration, or there is a background job taking up resources. Or there is a network issue.

    The first step is narrow down what is perceived as slow. Everything? Always? Some queries? Some times?

    But this is the security forum, so it is not really the correct venue for the question.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    • Proposed as answer by amber zhang Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:32 AM
    • Marked as answer by amber zhang Wednesday, August 1, 2012 1:54 AM
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012 7:28 PM